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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When your chain breaks and you need to remove a link, do you usually replace the link or just remove it?

My chain broke on the trail and I removed a link to fix it. My bike didn't seem to shift as smooth yesterday. I'm wondering if removing the link has something to do with it.
 

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(enter witty phrase here)
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bank5 said:
My chain broke on the trail and I removed a link to fix it. My bike didn't seem to shift as smooth yesterday. I'm wondering if removing the link has something to do with it.
You may have bent your derailleur/hanger.

When your chain breaks and you need to remove a link, do you usually replace the link or just remove it?
It all depends on if your chain was the proper length to begin with. Most chains are excessively long. One link won't harm anything. If you're not sure check the length.

Chain Sizing - Largest Cog and Largest Chainring Method

An alternative method for determining chain length for new chains is to use the largest size sprockets on the bike. It is easiest to size the chain without threading it through the derailleur.
  1. Remove the old chain.
  2. Shift the front derailleur over the largest chainring, and the rear derailleur on the smallest cog.
  3. Thread the new chain through the front derailleur. It is not necessary to thread the chain through the rear derailleur at this point. Simply wrap the chain around the largest front chainring and around the largest rear cog.
  4. Pull the chain tight, and note the closest rivet where the two could be joined. Keep in mind a chain can only be joined by mating inner and outer plates.
  5. From the closet rivet, lengthen the chain by counting over an additional two rivets (two links), which is a distance of one-inch. Cut the chain at this point.
  6. Remove the chain from the bike and thread it through both derailleurs and join the ends.
 

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Old man on a bike
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Strykar said:
yes, just slap a new master/power link to it and you should be set bro. taking that link out, you shortened the chain, making the chainline change, so i would def add the link back
The chainline doesn't change with chain length.

OP-If the shifting is a bit worse after your repair you might check for a stiff link at the repaired link causing some trouble. One link shorter usually isn't too bad but if you're prone to shifting into the big/big on occasion it could make that more difficult...
 

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EDR
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one link usually makes little to no difference but if your chain was very short to start with it will be a problem. I'd remove the chain and make sure that all the links move freely. Often when a chain breaks part of it gets jammed up into some part of the drivetrain making a 'sticky' section. Also be sure that the rear der. didn't get damaged. If it swung up into the rear cassette it might have gotten tweaked inwards a bit. This will cause funky shifting for sure. (the hanger or the der. might have been tweaked)
 
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