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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since buying my new Stumpy I feel like I am a little more stretched out on the bike than my last one and I'm thinking about getting a shorter stem (current one is about 6" and I'm thinking 4" would be right ) . Will this have any negative impact on the overall geometry or handling of the bike ?
 

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That's pretty long! My 2007 Stumpy (small frame) came with one of those adjustable angle Specialized stems, that was I believe around 90 mm long. I have short arms, and felt too outstretched, so I bought a 50 mm Race Face Atlas stem. I'm happier with the shorter stem, it provides quicker handling and braking doesn't send me too far forward anymore.
 

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Does your seatpost have setback at all? if so, you could try going for one w/out setback and you would be able to have your saddle farther up.
 

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Studies show that 100mm stems offer a good balance for the rider in bike control vs. comfort. I wouldn't go below 90mm if I were you. 100mm is very slightly less than 4 inches.
Were you measured before you bought the bike? I hope it fits you correctly!
 

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I ride an 06 XL Stumpy. The bike originally came with a 120mm stem. After just a few rides I figured out it was way too long. Fireroads and smooth singletrack felt fast and smooth but jumps and technical areas were very scary. I moved to a 90mm stem to shorten the cockpit. This change with a wider bar made a huge difference. The steering was quicker and felt stiffer. The wide bar allowed more leverage and I had more confidence with jumps and the technical areas. The front end became a little lighter but it was very controllable.

I have been on the 90mm for a few years now. My riding has advanced even more and and I am now considering moving to an even shorter stem. I tried an 80mm out on a local trail. Steering was quicker (which I liked) and the bike felt more nimble. I still had the big bike feel from the XL frame but body english was more effective. I reinstalled my original 90mm stem and could feel the difference even just sitting on the bike.

I am now searching for a 70 or 75mm stem to try out. I think the 70mm might be too short and the front end will wander on climbs but this is correctable with riding style and the positive effects might outweigh this condition.
 

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50mm stem and be done with it. You'll adapt on the climbs and rip the DH. Any bike meant to be ridden downhill on dirt should have a short stem, they handle way better. You'll learn to climb with the short stem.
 

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Shorter, higher closer cockpit = Mo' bettah

I changed the 120mm stem on my 2003 size XL SJ for a 90, and also put on a seatube with a 10mm offset rather than the stock 20mm offset, and also went from a stock 1/2 inch riser bar to a high-riser (1-1/2 inch). The overall effect shortened my stretch by almost two inches, and opened up my posture. Wow, what a difference. It cost about a hundred bucks ... fifty for the h/b, twenty for the stem, and twenty-five for the used post. The fit gurus might say I can't climb as good (CoG moved further forward from rear wheel axle) or steer as good (less weight over top of front wheel) or roll as good (less aero) but I'll tell you it's the second best upgrade I've done on my bike (after hydro brakes). I climb, steer and roll much better. I got a lot of fit tips after getting fitted for my road bike at LBS and it's made a huge difference. Good luck with your fit... let us hear how it works out.
 

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ambassadorhawg said:
Studies show that 100mm stems offer a good balance for the rider in bike control vs. comfort. I wouldn't go below 90mm if I were you. 100mm is very slightly less than 4 inches.
Were you measured before you bought the bike? I hope it fits you correctly!
Can you give a source for these "studies"? I always ride with stems shorter than 90mm (on my three current rides, they range from 70 - 90 mm)

To the OP, it won't effect the geometry at all.... What you may find is that turning is quicker with a shorter stem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
In case anyone gives a rats ass.... I got a 105MM adjustable stem and set it to 14* rise ... So far, I like it ... will report back after a few more rides.
 

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Nagaredama said:
50mm stem and be done with it. You'll adapt on the climbs and rip the DH. Any bike meant to be ridden downhill on dirt should have a short stem, they handle way better. You'll learn to climb with the short stem.
I started with 100mm, went to 80mm, and am now running a 60mm, which as far as I know the shortest available for the e150 fork on the SL.

It took a couple of rides to get used to, climbing especially, but I'm freaking sold. It makes me happy.

The steering just feels so much livlier, on switchbacks in particular.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
MY LBS said to ride the 105 for a while and if I did not like it they would swap it out for a shorter one.
 

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The only problem I am having with the 50 mm stem (I am sold as well on this bike) is that my wrists are at a pretty bad angle to the bars - as in more angular break at the wrist, vs. if I was oustretched with a longer stem the angle would be lessened. This wouldn't be a big deal, except I am suffering tendonitus in my left wrist, mainly from kids, but also biking doesn't help. I am curious in how the higher rise bars affect the ride, I had considered that for a straighter wrist. I also considered the ergon grips, which I might have to do eventually. I have them on my around-town bike (don't know what else to call a hardtail with slicks and a comfy seat for towing a kid trailer) and so far like it.

Thanks...
 
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