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Just curious to what thoughts are out there on if you run a longer shock than frame was designed for and then run more sag to compensate what would be the effect on ride. Would it become more plush?Thabks for any time to answr :confused:
 

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noMAD man
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Within limits, it works.

rjpstoked said:
Just curious to what thoughts are out there on if you run a longer shock than frame was designed for and then run more sag to compensate what would be the effect on ride. Would it become more plush?Thabks for any time to answr :confused:
5 out of the 8 full suspension bikes I've owned have eventually wound up with a longer shock. As long as you don't have frame/shock/swingarm interference, it will usually work. How well it works obviously depends on the type and design of the suspension. Some particular models may change the rate of the suspension to such a degree that the quality of that extra travel doesn't justify the effort. On a Bullit and a couple of FSRs, the increase was most definitely an improvement in the amount and quality of travel. In all instances the increase in rear travel was accompanied by an increase in fork travel. Additionally a bike like a Bullit has a shuttle that lets you manipulate head angle even more. Just compensating for longer rear travel by adjusting for more sag may not be the most efficient way of setting up such a modified bike. When I've modified some of my bikes, I wanted more travel on both ends, so a balance in the setup was easier to achieve with a slightly longer fork. As far as your question about plushness, generally, more travel means more plushness, but with stable platform shocks, it's not quite as much of an impact--in both a positive and negative way. The '99 FSR pictured here had maybe 4" of rear travel. The aftermarket link and shock bumped it up to 6", and it was very high quality, usable travel.
 

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"El Whatever"
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Little increments...

... could work. Just check for frame interferences and calculate how much the shock is to compress. Maybe the compensation for sag would eliminate any travel gain. Depends on the leverage ratio also. Say, if the leverage increases, then you're gonna go easily thru travel and bottoming would be the note of the day.

Check out all factors... there's a reason why frames are spec'ed for a given shock. Believe me, there were a bunch of engineers, computers and test rides before your bike hit the sotres.
 
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