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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks, thanks for the support on the "Differences between 2005 and 2006 Hollowpoint MKIII" thread.

My Azure is supposed to be delivered tomorrow, and I'll have some time to set it up over the weekend. What's typically involved in setting one of these up?

AFAIK, the only real setup I will have to do involves the front and rear shocks. I got the Progressive manual, and it seems pretty clear what I'll have to do to attain the 30% sag. I'm a heavy guy, so I'll probably set up the front shock stiff so I won't bottom out on it. Many reviews of this fork (Manitou Skareb 100mm) emphasize it is a bit too plush. I'll get a shock pump from the LBS this afternoon.

I also assume I'll have to set the derailleur limit screws and indexing, and fill and bleed the hydraulic brakes. Is this particularly difficult, or will it require special tools?

I'll also loctite the suspension bolts, given all the reports of loosening!

Would you expect the wheels to be true and the spokes to be tight, or should I tighten them?

I haven't ordered a bike in "dealer ready" condition before, but I figure the setup is a good way to become familiar with the unique features and maintenance required by FS.

thanks
 

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Black Lion
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You will not have to touch the brakes other than to dial them in to your liking and make sure they do not rub.

You will have to....
dial in the shifting.
Install fork
The wheels come pretty true. You may have to tweak slightly.

That is basically it
 

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billiebob said:
Hi folks, thanks for the support on the "Differences between 2005 and 2006 Hollowpoint MKIII" thread.

My Azure is supposed to be delivered tomorrow, and I'll have some time to set it up over the weekend. What's typically involved in setting one of these up?

AFAIK, the only real setup I will have to do involves the front and rear shocks. I got the Progressive manual, and it seems pretty clear what I'll have to do to attain the 30% sag. I'm a heavy guy, so I'll probably set up the front shock stiff so I won't bottom out on it. Many reviews of this fork (Manitou Skareb 100mm) emphasize it is a bit too plush. I'll get a shock pump from the LBS this afternoon.

I also assume I'll have to set the derailleur limit screws and indexing, and fill and bleed the hydraulic brakes. Is this particularly difficult, or will it require special tools?

I'll also loctite the suspension bolts, given all the reports of loosening!

Would you expect the wheels to be true and the spokes to be tight, or should I tighten them?

I haven't ordered a bike in "dealer ready" condition before, but I figure the setup is a good way to become familiar with the unique features and maintenance required by FS.

thanks
The Skareb and other Manitous like the Black and Minute are Air/Spring shocks. The first part of the travel uses a Spring the second part of the travel uses and Air shock. The springs are weight rated. At your weight you would probably need a heavy spring. There is a color code on the spring. Red is medium, Blue is light I think, White might be heavy. Typically they ship with medium springs.

Talk to your LBS or call manitou tech support.

If you got the Azure Expert from RS cycle than it looks like you got the Skareb 100 with SPV. In my opinion this is a good choice as the SPV in the fork seems to compliment the DWlink. This is an oem fork only, they never sold and SPV 100 Skareb.

The reviews you read are probably for the Skareb Super which uses TPC damping. I had a Black super 100 with TPC and found it too plush for pedaling singletrack and climbing. Awesome for downhills though. I think the SPV on the fork compliments the DW link well.

Here are some ramblings on fork setup I wrote
https://www.thebikinghub.com/mtb/tips-and-tricks-for-tuning-your-manitou-fork/#more-356
https://www.thebikinghub.com/mtb/three-manitou-forks-compared-black-super-minute/

One knock on the Skareb is that it is an XC racing fork. At your weight it may feel flexy in the stanchions. The 2005 Manitou Minute 100 SPV is an nice beefier fork that you can find really cheap, it's what I run on my HP.

That is definitely a nice bike.

Although keep an eye on the rear wheel. The laserdic lite hubset (which I own) is the best value in a lightweight hubset. But the rear isnt sealed the best from wet weather. The freebody is really easy to maintain though and you should repack it with light grease or lube like phil wood regularly (DON'T use typical bearing grease it is too sticky). Depending on the year of the hubset, the rear hub had some potential failures with the cam plate. They made an upgrade kit that included a new cam plate and spring in the freebody. When you get the bike call Mike at www.oddsandendos.com and give him the serial # off the rear hub and he'll let you know if you might want to have one on hand.

Here are instructions for working on the rear hub.
https://www.amclassic.com/tech/pdf/AmClassicCamPlatePg1.jpg
https://www.amclassic.com/tech/pdf/AmClassicCamPlatePg2.jpg
 

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skareb specs

timely thread. 2005 azure expert.
( http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=208835 )

so what's a clydesdale to do with the skareb? a little time on the 'net did not reveal any max air pressures for setting sag. boyz 200+ lbs are looking at 100+ lbs of air pressure (left fork). the SPV damping is spec'd (PDF online for 2004 model) to hold b/w 30 and 100 lbs. of pressure.

the fork is spongy at approx. 120 lbs. left (for static sag) and 75 lbs. right (for damping). will i find nirvana by increasing damping to 100 lbs.?

also, in waking from my state of blissful ignorance (aka hardtail riding), i am reading just enough to be dangerous. the manual (below) mentions a pre-load kit. my hardtail fork was rebuilt with stiffer springs. is there a kit for the Skareb Super SPV?

http://www.answerproducts.com/manuals/answermanitou/forks/Year/2004/04Skareb_eng.pdf

any tips appreciated, incl. links. gentle abuse o.k. too. serious abuse is trail only:D
 

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Look down at the bottom of the manual. They have a list of available ride kits
There is an xtra firm for 215-235lbs.

The best thing to do is the call Answer tech support. They are really good about calling back. Ed or Bobby are great. Tell them about your fork year and model , your weight, etc. and they'll help you get it dialed in and get you the right part#s you need. They only work through authorized dealers so you typically have to get parts ordered through an LBS or some other mailorder place
 

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ashwinearl said:
The Skareb and other Manitous like the Black and Minute are Air/Spring shocks. The first part of the travel uses a Spring the second part of the travel uses and Air shock. The springs are weight rated. At your weight you would probably need a heavy spring. There is a color code on the spring. Red is medium, Blue is light I think, White might be heavy. Typically they ship with medium springs.

Talk to your LBS or call manitou tech support.

If you got the Azure Expert from RS cycle than it looks like you got the Skareb 100 with SPV. In my opinion this is a good choice as the SPV in the fork seems to compliment the DWlink. This is an oem fork only, they never sold and SPV 100 Skareb.

[ snip ... ]
ashwinearl
nice posting:thumbsup: i have a question for you. figuring moderate-to-good technical prowess (tools, not trails), do you suppose that i can do the spring swap from medium to heavy myself? if this is a task worthy of a competent bike shop mechanic, what do you suppose this should set me back? is the fork likely to be suitable for a clydesdale with a heavy spring? neither the bike nor me figure to be doing drops, etc.

thanks.
 

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ashwinearl said:
Look down at the bottom of the manual. They have a list of available ride kits
There is an xtra firm for 215-235lbs.

The best thing to do is the call Answer tech support. They are really good about calling back. Ed or Bobby are great. Tell them about your fork year and model , your weight, etc. and they'll help you get it dialed in and get you the right part#s you need. They only work through authorized dealers so you typically have to get parts ordered through an LBS or some other mailorder place
thanks:) :)
 

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jroandotb said:
ashwinearl
nice posting:thumbsup: i have a question for you. figuring moderate-to-good technical prowess (tools, not trails), do you suppose that i can do the spring swap from medium to heavy myself? if this is a task worthy of a competent bike shop mechanic, what do you suppose this should set me back? is the fork likely to be suitable for a clydesdale with a heavy spring? neither the bike nor me figure to be doing drops, etc.

thanks.
One thing I love about Manitou forks is that they are easy to work on albeit a little messy. Download the technical manuals for your model fork from answer. Also check these pictorial instructions for the Manitou Minute and 03 Manitou Black. Their construction is similar to the Skareb SPV.
http://www.enduroforkseals.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderfiles/minute1web_b.pdf
http://www.enduroforkseals.com/id16.html

I have some tips in this post that was mentioned earlier:
http://www.thebikinghub.com/mtb/tips-and-tricks-for-tuning-your-manitou-fork/#more-356

It helps to have some manitou M-prep grease on hand too.

It's easy to change out the spring. It is just a little tricky putting the spring side damper back in cause the spring can have issues seating itself, but just spinning it around a little usually gets it to seat right.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info. I got the bike last night, mounted the wheels and adjusted the derailleurs. The bike certainly looks fabulous, and is about the same weight as my old hardtail. I won't have time to dial in the shock until Sunday. I'm pumped!
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I went on my first long ride today, and I'm pretty darn happy. Climbing is slightly better than my hardtail, and downhills are 100X better. The brakes are amazing, and it is really nice to have a quiet, smooth drivetrain so I can concentrate on not crashing.

I set up the 5th Element for 20% sag and had no pedal bob from the rear at all. Fabulous! Even with 100 psi in the left leg of the Skareb and 50 in the SPV leg the front shock is going to take some getting used to. I'l be climbing hills in the saddle more than I'm used to with so much going on up front.

I also learned from my setup rides that unless I have high rebound damping, bumps and roots can chuck me right off the trail! With lots of damping (and slightly lower tire pressure) I can cruise on through.

In a new thread I reported that my LX front derailleur runs right into the rear triangle at 50% of the 5th element's travel when I'm on the small chainring, an issue that I hope can be solved with a different model of derailleur. Otherwise, I'm in new bike la la land.

Thanks for the tips!
 
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