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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to SC website to check what they recommend for set up.

they say 10-15 for rear sag, but do not say what points to use to measure and 10-15 what (CM, Inches)

can someone splain to me vhat to do?

Many thanks, for me this is my dream bike and I want to start with the bike just as they recommend.

PS I bought it used and did not received the manual.
 

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crash test dummy
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What do you weigh?

I recommend you search this forum for sag settings on the Blur. You'll get a variety of responses for different weights. This helped me quite a lot in determining the proper pressures.

plate said:
I went to SC website to check what they recommend for set up.

they say 10-15 for rear sag, but do not say what points to use to measure and 10-15 what (CM, Inches)

can someone splain to me vhat to do?

Many thanks, for me this is my dream bike and I want to start with the bike just as they recommend.

PS I bought it used and did not received the manual.
 

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plate said:
I went to SC website to check what they recommend for set up.

they say 10-15 for rear sag, but do not say what points to use to measure and 10-15 what (CM, Inches)

can someone splain to me vhat to do?

Many thanks, for me this is my dream bike and I want to start with the bike just as they recommend.

PS I bought it used and did not received the manual.
BCBlur is right. It's sag in mm measured at the shock. Your air shock shold have an o-ring on the shaft. Slide the o-ring up to the main body of the shock, get on the bike..carefully (without bouncing around)..get back off the bike and check to see how far the o-ring moved down the shock shaft. IF ou don't have an o-ring on the shaft, use a tie wrap or buy another o-ring from the hardware store.

YOu can use suggestions form others on what pressure to use based on weight, but that's just a starting point. THe key is to have the correct sag, regardless of the pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Right,

The bike rides plush the way it is set up now but I know I am running too much sag and want to set the bike up according to standard.

Thanks a lot.

Blue Shorts said:
BCBlur is right. It's sag in mm measured at the shock. Your air shock shold have an o-ring on the shaft. Slide the o-ring up to the main body of the shock, get on the bike..carefully (without bouncing around)..get back off the bike and check to see how far the o-ring moved down the shock shaft. IF ou don't have an o-ring on the shaft, use a tie wrap or buy another o-ring from the hardware store.

YOu can use suggestions form others on what pressure to use based on weight, but that's just a starting point. THe key is to have the correct sag, regardless of the pressure.
 

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Remember this when setting up your suspension...

The bike is like a 'teeter-totter' with the front and rear suspension. I found that using a zip tie on one of the legs of the fork and and o-ring on the shock is the best way. Gently get on the back and slowly pedal around on a flat concrete surface in your normal riding position....gently get off the bike and measure the sag of the fork and shock....you may need to make adjustments to one or both, but remember, if you make an adjustment to one, it will affect the sag of the other....for example, if you increase the pressure in the rear shock, it will inherently put more weight on the front fork which may cause you to have to add some pressure to the fork to keep the sag constant...if you add pressure to the fork, it will shift your weight back and increase the sag on the shock, forcing you to add more pressure to the shock...I find that balancing the front and back is very important or one end feels dead....I like about 12-15mm sag on the shock and 15-20mm sag on the fork...feels good to me..you may like more or less sag....
 

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I am not trying to be the master of the obvious here but the best thing to do is get out and ride the bike. Take your pump with you out on the local trail and accept the fact that you will be getting on and off the bike multiple times. Definitely set your sag in the garage but once you get it out on the trails don't be afraid to adjust it to find the pressure that works best for you and your riding style. I keep a log of measurements before ride and after ride with notes, this may seem anal but it will save you a lot of headaches down the road. You can never make too many adjustments :)
 

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sanger66 said:
I am not trying to be the master of the obvious here but the best thing to do is get out and ride the bike. Take your pump with you out on the local trail and accept the fact that you will be getting on and off the bike multiple times. Definitely set your sag in the garage but once you get it out on the trails don't be afraid to adjust it to find the pressure that works best for you and your riding style. I keep a log of measurements before ride and after ride with notes, this may seem anal but it will save you a lot of headaches down the road. You can never make too many adjustments :)
I agree with sanger66 and MCF, you need to balance the front and rear and then tweak from there, I always carried my shock pump with me for the first few months. I also applied the engineering method with a shorter local trail and moved one variable at a time using the extreems of the recommended and then a point in the middle. I could then have a calibrated butt to how the different sag/pressure settings impacted the bike. I now tweak settings based on trail/weather conditions/mood/etc. Another note, I tried to experiment on concrete with no avail, you need to ride a short local loop that you are familiar with.
 
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