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Does this exist in the world of disc brakes (for bicycles, that is)? I’m about to embark on my 4th trip to the bike shop to have the disc brakes on my new bike adjusted. Basically, after about 3 or 4 rides one of the pads will start rubbing on the roter. I take it to the shop, they fix it, but the problem just returns. They always say the caliper is a little “off center” or something like that. I’m always wondering what the heck makes if go “off center.” I’d feel a little better if it was because I am too much of a bad-ass rider, but I doubt that’s case! The brakes are Avid Jucy 7. If I try to fix it myself (following the instructions on Avid’s web site), it rarely gets better, and sometimes I make it worse.

I am not, nor will I ever be a bike mechanic. I just enjoy riding mountain bikes, and I have always accepted that basic self-maintenance goes with the sport. However, these darn brakes are becoming a real pain in the you-know-what! That brings me back to my original question, is it possible for bicycle disc brakes to operate for extended periods of time (like about a year) without needing to be serviced in any way? If so, is one brand better than another? Is it normal for pads to rub on the roter? Is it possible my brakes are defective?

Sorry, what started as a question turned into a semi-rant.
 

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Old man on a bike
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Some of the reasons I stay away from hydraulic disc brakes and stay with Avid mechanicals (BBDB/BB7s), much easier to keep happier on your own IMHO. I do wonder why your calipers are moving around, though. You may have an inept shop as far as those brakes are concerned, too; personally some things you just need to do yourself to be the happiest about the results.
 

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morider said:
Does this exist in the world of disc brakes (for bicycles, that is)? I'm about to embark on my 4th trip to the bike shop to have the disc brakes on my new bike adjusted. Basically, after about 3 or 4 rides one of the pads will start rubbing on the roter. I take it to the shop, they fix it, but the problem just returns. They always say the caliper is a little "off center" or something like that. I'm always wondering what the heck makes if go "off center." I'd feel a little better if it was because I am too much of a bad-ass rider, but I doubt that's case! The brakes are Avid Jucy 7. If I try to fix it myself (following the instructions on Avid's web site), it rarely gets better, and sometimes I make it worse.

I am not, nor will I ever be a bike mechanic. I just enjoy riding mountain bikes, and I have always accepted that basic self-maintenance goes with the sport. However, these darn brakes are becoming a real pain in the you-know-what! That brings me back to my original question, is it possible for bicycle disc brakes to operate for extended periods of time (like about a year) without needing to be serviced in any way? If so, is one brand better than another? Is it normal for pads to rub on the roter? Is it possible my brakes are defective?

Sorry, what started as a question turned into a semi-rant.
This is the reason I'm switching back to V-brakes.:D
 

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Canuckistan
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131 Posts
I love how Discs get a bad rep from people who are unable to properly set them up. Dont get me wrong, as a bike mech, I know a wee bit more than most bikers. But Discs should not be hard to set up. In fact, once their set up, they need less maintenance than V brakes. The Avid CPS (caliper positioning system) on their calipers makes it a breeze to set them up and leave them. The only time I could ever see a problem, is if the mech at your shop does not know what Blue loctite (242).

Ok, now that my rant is done....The Avid CPS has a rather annoying flaw to it, if the bolts aren't damn tight, and you brake really hard, the caliper will bite and move. thus, causing rubbing. I had this happen a few times before I realized the problem, though when it happened to me, I was on a DH course with both wheels locked
 

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ride hard take risks
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25,423 Posts
Hyrdos can be a set and forget, whether you have V-brakes, mechanical or hydro disc there are going to be some that are more emo than others & may take a little more work, frustrating even for mechanics. Hayes has been using .015" feeler gauges to setup the caliper for years and it seems to work with other brands also. Hayes put together a really good video to bleed & set up the Stroker, if you go towards the end you will get to the part where they setup the caliper with feeler gauges give this a try & see if it helps. :thumbsup:

http://www.youtube.com//HayesDiscBrakes
 

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Daniel the Dog
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6,764 Posts
I have been hammering the XT 765's

I have set them and forgot them. They have been bulletproof and NEVER rub or make noise. Best brake I have run. I have misery with the crappy Juicy brakes....and even suckier Maggies.

Jaybo
 
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