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Sofa King We Todd Did
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a 2004 Jekyll 800 and the stock wheels aren't rolling quite as well as they used to. Figured I might be able to open them up, clean them up and slap some grease in there to help them roll a little better. Problem is, the Lefty hub scares me a little and I'm not so sure about finding my way around the rear hub, either.

Any advice, any step-by-step process, or any online instructions I may be led to? Thanks a million.
 

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LA CHÈVRE
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9,429 Posts
SpinWheelz said:
I've got a 2004 Jekyll 800 and the stock wheels aren't rolling quite as well as they used to. Figured I might be able to open them up, clean them up and slap some grease in there to help them roll a little better. Problem is, the Lefty hub scares me a little and I'm not so sure about finding my way around the rear hub, either.

Any advice, any step-by-step process, or any online instructions I may be led to? Thanks a million.
On Lefty hubs, the cartridge bearings are just pressed in. So you can use a punch to carefully get them out. But maybe it's not even required. The big one by the rotor is easily accessed by just taking off the rotor and the prying off the shield. You can then, carefully again, take off the bearing side cover (sorry for the basic terminology) then inspect and clean the balls then repack some fresh quality grease in. On the other side, you'll need a pin spanner to take off the axle bolt to access the bearing.

As for the rear hub, it depends what hub it really is. In 2004, weren't the hubs rebranded DT Hugi? I'm not sure on your particular bike though.

Edit: Here's a diagram to help you understand how the front hub is made. Hope it helps.
 

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Sofa King We Todd Did
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2,262 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much for that exploded view of the hub. Any advice on what sort of tools I'll need? Just cone wrenches? Also, when putting it back together, do I just tighten everything 'til it spins smoothly and there's no binding? Or is there some other trick to it?
 

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LA CHÈVRE
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No cones, they are cartridge bearings. You'll need a punch of some sort to push out the bearings if you really want to. Just be careful to push it as straight as possible to avoid any damage to the shell (the hub I mean). A rubber punch would be a good idea but there might have tools made for that (I have never worked in a shop but check Park Tool's web site). You just put everything back by pressing the cartridge bearings back in the hub and re-installing the end cap/extracting axle bolt assembly, grease and when putting the wheel back on the bike, the torque on the bolt should make everything just tight and nice.
 

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Sofa King We Todd Did
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Would it be a complete waste of time to open up the hub, smother some grease in there without popping out the cartridge bearings, then putting it back together again? Or do the cartridge bearings really need to be popped out to get the grease in the correct areas of the hub?
 

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Spin, you can gently pry off the rubber seal using a fine pick and pack some grease into the bearing if it looks clean. I would prefer to remove the bearings (both sides), remove rubber seals or shields so that bearings can be cleaned well using a solvent. Then repack bearings, install seals and insert back into hubs. If you do remove the bearings to clean and repack them, you might try leaving the bearings in freezer for a couple of hours to shrink them slightly so that installation will be easier.
 

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LA CHÈVRE
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It's hard to diagnose over a forum... After a couple of rides, my Prophet's Lefty hub was not so smooth and made a screeching sound when spinning. I took off the wheel and without dissasembling anything (I didn't even take off the rotor), cleaned the grease that was already there, cleaned the axle, regreased, put it back on and it has been perfectly smooth ever since. Might be worth a try to do only that as it takes a minute and doesn't cost more than a gob of fresh grease. If it doesn't solve the problem, perhaps you should go deeper...
 

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Sofa King We Todd Did
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cheers, fellas. Good bits of advice all around. Since I'm not too good at 'invasive surgery', I might try the minimalist approach first to see if that improves anything.
 
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