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I'm curious how many of you have separate bikes for racing and training. I want to have a separate bike to "beat on" in foul weather and to use for the bulk of my training so as to keep a "racing" bike in good shape, but I'm also struggling with the idea of riding the better, more expensive bike less.

How many of you do this? If not, what do you do to transform your everyday training bike to a racing machine?
 

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bikes

cpl thoughts -

1) Bikes usually get new chains, tires, brake pads for race day anyhow. So no issue there.
2) Mostly try to keep race bike in garage for bad weather, train on the road on the commuter bike when it is raining
3) Usually have training tires that I go back to after race day. Heavy, puncture proof to take on any terrain & minimize down time to flats.

Essentially - I do not have a MTB that gets used only for training or only for racing. But I do try to manage the amount of foul weather the race bikes see in training. Besides these days I train so little in the dirt it doesn't matter much.

Hope this helps,
 

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2-bike solution

I like to have two bikes for endurance racing. In the winter, I set one up with heavier tires and wheels. Throw some fenders, lights and a tool kit on one of them and you have a winter training bike.

I need to keep the cockpit setup the same on both bikes, at a minimum. That makes it possible to switch between them for training or racing without biomechanical issues.

Train heavy, race light! :thumbsup:
 

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I'm coming at this from a different angle, "train heavy race light" is something I don't agree with. How about "practice how you play". I have two so called race bikes and I feel comfortable knowing that they both function flawlessly when the time comes to hammer. For example, I use the same tires for racing and training. The more I practice on them in the corners, over the loose stuff, etc., allows me to really get a feel for what I can and can't do. I used to have a 32lb training bike but when I switched to training on my race bike I immediately found better lines and I could hold my flow/ momentum through the trails much easier for XC and endurace events. Just my $.02. :)
 

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Good Point

I don't completely disagree. I set my winter training bike up with heavy wheels, tires and fork. I also tend to hand lights and tools on it, since I ride in pretty unpleasant conditions in the winter. Pushing all that extra weight and rolling resistance from December until April makes be stronger.

During racing season, I set both bikes up to be as similar as possible. I want to be able to switch between them without any ill effect; setting one up to be heavier on purpose does not work in this situation.

That being said, I don't have the cash to set up both bikes exactly the same. I get closer every year, but I still have a way to go. I think my backup bike will be about 2 pounds heavier than my 'main' bike during 12 and 24 hour races. But they will have the same cockpit dimensions and run the same tires in this scenario.

bikesinmud said:
I'm coming at this from a different angle, "train heavy race light" is something I don't agree with. How about "practice how you play". I have two so called race bikes and I feel comfortable knowing that they both function flawlessly when the time comes to hammer. For example, I use the same tires for racing and training. The more I practice on them in the corners, over the loose stuff, etc., allows me to really get a feel for what I can and can't do. I used to have a 32lb training bike but when I switched to training on my race bike I immediately found better lines and I could hold my flow/ momentum through the trails much easier for XC and endurace events. Just my $.02. :)
 

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I run "training" and "racing" setups, and here's the breakdown:

My training wheels are heavier and more durable than my racing wheels
My training tires are UST, racing are standard, both with Stan's, both same width
Cassettes are the same model/cluster
Training chain is lower end
My training seatpost is heavier, racing is Ti. Saddle bag stays on the training setup, but not for racing. Put a small piece of tape on the post for quick install....
My training saddle is comfier (and attached to the training post...of course), the racing saddle is lighter (except for endurance races, where i'll opt for comfort).

Cockpit, derailleurs etc. don't change, so the feel is familiar btwn setups.

Most of my dual setup comes from hand me downs from old bikes or from the bargain bins at the LBS, so it doesn't need to be outrageously expensive.

It sounds much more complicated than it really is...the whole conversion only takes a few minutes.
 

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Joe_Jitsu said:
Pushing all that extra weight and rolling resistance from December until April makes be stronger.
I can appreciate that concept, but my $0.02 say that if you're looking for more resistance or a harder ride, then just ride faster on the regular bike and you get the same benefit. It's all about power output at the pedals, and power is power regardless of whether you're on a 25lb bike or 30lb bike - the training effect is the same provided you're putting down the same power at the cranks (regardless of resultant speed differences).
 

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I have known a lot of racers both road and mtb that use the same bike but have wheels for training and wheels for racing. If you change your chain frequently, every 4- 6 weeks during heavy mileage, you won't have issues with chain skipping when you change wheels out. Typically the training wheels are heavier with more beefy rims, saving the real light stuff for just racing, since most of the real lightweight stuff sacrifices strength. Of course, you still want to train with the race wheels every once in a while to make sure everything is in tune and you get comfy with the tires again, if they are different. New wheels aren't cheap, but a hell lot less expensive than a whole bike, you can get some xt's with 819's for under $250
 

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Personally I think it would be great to be able to afford a training bike and a race bike, but that's kinda expensive if they're kitted out the same. Right now I have a heavy duty wheelset that I know takes a beating, but I am getting a new wheelset built to meet me in CO for the LT100 I'm training for and will use them for a couple weeks leading up to the race and on race day, but will train w/ the heavy duty set till then. More RR means more effort and when you get on the lighter set it will feel like you've lost 5lbs off the bike and not just 1-15lbs.

I do agree with doing some training on the same tyre as you will race on since they generally sacrifice some grip/traction for better RR and weight. Right now I have on my Schwalbe Marathon Cross tyres trying them out on all kinds of terrain and getting used to how they handle and what to expect from that sort of tyre as I've heard the course there isn't too technical and alot of people run semi slicks - me I will make final decission once I reach there.
 

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Depending on where I am in my training I ride my rhode bike 2-4 days a week and my ‘race mountain’ bike 2-3 days a week for a total ration of 2/3’s rhode 1/3 mtb or there abouts. I try to make the mtb riding ‘fun’ whether I’m training or racing.
I have a backup bike for really nasty days, alternate to riding the other 2 and backup for racing.
I race what I train on but each bike has its own setup I just try to make sure wearable stuff is new for the race and don’t make any drastic changes in setup unless forced too.
 

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Couldn't resist the urge to ride my best bike.....

My objectives are a little different, I want a light, reliable bike good for 8 hour hard rides several days in a row, without a lot of maintaince.

I spent a year upgrading stuff that broke or wore out to quickly, (I believe well designed stuff can be light and last all though it sure costs alot).

I will spend this year replacing heavy stuff that didn't break to reduce the weight.

Knock on wood, I think I am getting there.
 
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