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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there, just bought a Selle Italia Flite XC Gel Flow saddle and I need to know what its rail size is. It looks like I'm going to need to buy a different-sized Cyclops seatpost clamp for my USE Alien carbon seatpost.

Thanks in advance.

 

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With the exception of the Single Rail system seat rails are set to a standard diameter and width.
 

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Virtually all XC saddles are the same 7mm rail diameter, some of the DH/FR saddles use 8mm or even 9mm rails. Some Selle Italia saddles are using the oval rails that can't be clamped from the sides, but they are compatible with standard top/bottom clamps as you've shown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)


The Flite XC Gel Flow is spec'ed for XC and Downhill, so maybe it's 9mm. It's definitely ovalized, thicker vertically than standard rails. The USE Cyclops clamp comes in several sizes because its mechanism only works with one rail size.

It's a PITA to keep this seatpost, but it's a weight weenie's dream. I just contacted USE.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Did a 5-hour, 50 mile preride on it last weekend and I am very pleased with the Flite XC Gel Flow saddle. The same trail destroyed my back racing with a 135g SLR a couple of months ago. Not only does it have a taint hole, but the entire center section flexes. Plus it's totally hot-looking. I'd always wanted a Flite since I was a poor college student and now that I can afford one, I think they're even better than they used to be.

A couple of tips about the USE Alien seatpost for posterity: yes the Flite XC Gel Flow has 9.2 mm rails.

Secondly, the Alien seatpost is hard to get tight enough (to not slant back on you) after a big hit on the trail. The best technique for tightening the post I've discovered is this:

Tighten the Cyclops bolt until you feel like you might strip the threads if you go tighter. Then, smack the rear end of the saddle as hard as you can with an open palm a couple of times. Tighten one more turn. Smack again, and so on, for at least five turns, until you're again torquing nearly hard enough to strip the threads.

There's a very back-breaking trail locally that had me frustrated with this post until I figured out this technique.

J.Mc. said:
I've always wanted to try one of those saddles...
 
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