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That's "Mr. Tool" to you.
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Jake7 asked about my self studded tires. I figured mention of them would get some interest. I've had hikers looking at me like I'm nuts riding where they are having trouble staying on their feet. A couple of days ago I rode Enchanted Forest, all ice, and had a blast. Here is my technique on studding. Anyone else do different?

I start by identifying which lugs on the tire that I am going to stud. More screws means better traction. On the down side, more screws means more weight, more rolling friction, and more skating on rock and hard surfaces.

Then I take a drill with a fine bit, around 1/16 and drill from the outside in. This leaves a little mark on the inside of the tire casing where you start your screw, so that it comes out in the right spot on the lug.

I use a #6 stainless steel panhead screw, but I have used regular plated ones to. I use 1/4 inch length, but you will have to by a few sample lengths to see what is "right" for your lug thickness. I like them to stick out just around 1/16, or a bit more, but that's one for experimentation. It's hard to find screws much shorter than 3/16 or 1/4, so you might need to move up to a more agressive tire if you usually ride something fast.

After screwing the tire, I use Gorilla Tape inside to protect the tube from chaffing. It's a just a heavy duty duct tape available everywhere. I like to get each head coated by two layers, but usually try to use small pieces on the first run to cut down on the weight.

The job takes a few hours. A tire might use 70-100 screws ($5 a hundred at good hardware store).

If you build some up, give me a shout to join you for a test ride. I always get a kick out of people riding them for the first time
 

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torkima said:
After screwing the tire, I use Gorilla Tape inside to protect the tube from chaffing. It's a just a heavy duty duct tape available everywhere. I like to get each head coated by two layers, but usually try to use small pieces on the first run to cut down on the weight.
On the second layer do you cover the entire inside of the tire or do you use a seperate piece of tape for each screw?

Thanks for the info.:thumbsup:
 

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That's "Mr. Tool" to you.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Retsin, on the second layer, I cut the tape to a width just over the widest screw head spacing, then I lay pieces about three or four inches long in there one at a time. If you try one big piece, it's a cluster F... and it doesn't stay in the tire as well.
 

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I think I'm going to give it a shot. I've been eyeing those studded Nokians but at $105 each for 29ers I haven't been able to pull the trigger. I even have a roll of Gorilla tape in the garage. Perhaps a trip to Home Depot this evening is in order to get some sample screws.
 

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nOOby said:
just in case you're not too handy.

http://aebike.com/itemdetails.cfm?catalogId=39&id=706&guid=AEBIKE-DD-544-2

edit: Looks like nancy size only.
Wow, that is much cheaper than here I was looking -

http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/studdedtires.asp

So say $10 for the screws, $60 for 2 tires to replace the ones I fill with screws (cost deferred until spring) , and maybe $5 worth of tape = $75

vs.

$130 + $8.25 S&H = $138.25

I'm starting to think that maybe I'll buy the Nokians since they will probably be better than what I could make and if it takes me 4 hours that is under $15 per hour for my time. On the other hand it would only cost me $10 out of pocket right now to make my own. Hmmmmm.
 

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That's "Mr. Tool" to you.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
retsin, let me know how that tire works if you buy the pre-studded one. Looks like a squirly tread pattern.

The good thing about doing it yourself is, you've done it yourself. Also, it's kind of therapeutic, like knitting, and you have a chance to drill a hole in your finger, and when you're done, you have a connection with the tires you're riding. To eliminate that connection, gently back the screw out and have a rag ready to plug the hole in your hand. Ha!
 

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ColoradoCoolBreeze
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torkima said:
Looks like you're using sheet metal screws from the outside. Nice big head that doesn't wear as fast.

Do they skate badly on bare rock?
No skating, they do click alot on pavement. I try to stay in the dirt and snow with them. They are cheap sheetmetal screws installed with a drill and socket. Tips were ground down and a cut intertube was glued in as a liner. If I did it again I would put double the number of screws in, in hopes they would grip ice [like crossing a lake] better.Your idea looks like it would grip ice better.
 

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Loser
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I think I am going to try and do this with an old set of tires that I have. I might try to get some tungsten carbide screws though, since they will probably last longer than steel (especially if I have to ride on hard surfaces like rock/road). This looks like a really good/easy way to ride through the winter though. Thanks for sharing your ideas.
 

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That's "Mr. Tool" to you.
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey MCS,
I hope that you work in a machine shop where you can pilfer the tungsten carbide screws. They must cost a fortune. Great idea! I want to know what you do, the cost, and the result.

Check this out: http://www.aerostich.com/catalog/US/Self-Tapping-Carbide-Tire-Studs-p-19555.html

I'll bet if they made a set with a short self-tap body, that you could use this type stud over and over for years. The only thing is that I wonder if there is enough beef in a bike tire lug to hold something like this.

Keep us posted

Jt
 

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That's "Mr. Tool" to you.
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Keep us posted

Hey MCS,
I hope that you work in a machine shop where you can pilfer the tungsten carbide screws. They must cost a fortune. Great idea! I want to know what you do, the cost, and the result.

Check this out: http://www.aerostich.com/catalog/US/Self-Tapping-Carbide-Tire-Studs-p-19555.html

I'll bet if they made a set with a short self-tap body, that you could use this type stud over and over for years. The only thing is that I wonder if there is enough beef in a bike tire lug to hold something like this.

Keep us posted

Jt
 

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That's "Mr. Tool" to you.
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay, so I'm a dumbass who always tries to reinvent the wheel. Here are some interesting links from a quick google search for self-made and manufactured studded tires. Duh, google first, shoot your mouth off second, shoot your foot third, shoot your wife if you must.

http://www.icebike.org/Equipment/tires.htm
http://kentsbike.blogspot.com/2006/11/studded-bicycle-tires.html
http://www.wikihow.com/Convert-Bicycle-Tires-Into-Studded-Snow-Tires
http://www.icebike.org/Equipment/tirechains.htm
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/studdedtires.asp
http://www.silentsports.net/stud_your_own_bike_tires.html
 

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Moosehead
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cool thread torkima thanx for the tips. wish i had caught it before blowing some coin on the scwalbe icespiker pros, which are cool, but at 2.1" they're too thin for snow float. great hardpack or ice tire but that's it.
 

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I did my own set a few years ago and here is my $0.02.

Dont place screws in the center of the tread. Place the all screws ~20-30 degrees off center. The idea is that as the wheel rotates to contact the ground, the tire is deformed causing the screws placed slightly to the side to penetrate and pinch the ice. This also lessens the effect of sliding on rocks etc.

I used some old Velociraptors that I found in the dumpster for mine. I noticed that the tread repeated itself 24 times in both the front and rear tire. Therefore, I installed 48 1/4" sheet metal screws per tire. Instead of using tape I used an old innertube and babypowder to protect and lessen friction between the screw heads and tube. Works like a champ!
 
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