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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Out of nowhere I seem to have some sort of problem with my right upper calf. Haven't gone over the bars or felt a strain on any climbs or anything ... bit it just suddenly appeared. I have been playing around with my new RASE adj seatpost and trying different seat heights.

I've stayed off the bike for two weeks and tried an easy ride ( with the seat set lower ) and if anything, it felt worse. It feels like it's the back upper part of my calf muscle. Nothing visible, no swelling, just feels like I got punched really hard in that area. Anyone had this?
 

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******
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It happens to me when I dont warm up and stretch properly. It is especially bad when I ride with guys who are properly warmed up and like to hammer right out of the gate.
 

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Two Tired
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Perhaps your adjustments have left your saddle too low. Since your calf was OK before the new seatpost was installed, it seems like you should adjust the neutral position on the new post so the saddle height matches the height when you had the old post and your legs had no problems. After your leg recovers a bit, start testing and making small and measured adjustments until everything feels right.

I had a similar problem at one point an an expert friend suggested that my saddle was too low. I raised it a bit and things were better, so I homed in on the right height for me and the problems have never recurred. In the worst case, get a bike fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
CheapWhine said:
Perhaps your adjustments have left your saddle too low. Since your calf was OK before the new seatpost was installed, it seems like you should adjust the neutral position on the new post so the saddle height matches the height when you had the old post and your legs had no problems. After your leg recovers a bit, start testing and making small and measured adjustments until everything feels right.

I had a similar problem at one point an an expert friend suggested that my saddle was too low. I raised it a bit and things were better, so I homed in on the right height for me and the problems have never recurred. In the worst case, get a bike fit.
Thanks, but I'm positive my seatpost was if anything, higher than before. The new RASE adj seatpost is effing awesome but I hadn't set the upper limit on it yet, so occasionally it would go up a tad too far. I just didn't notice anything when riding. Which makes sense as that would cause a strain at full extension and that is where I can feel it when I flex my leg through motions. I must have over-extended the calf muscle. I just gotta be more patient and stay off the bike longer.

And you know how much fun that is. :sad:

I just thought I had heard once that it is a given .... seat too low will cause injury X and seat too high will cause injury Y.
 

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J:
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mount/dismount

G-out said:
I must have over-extended the calf muscle. I just gotta be more patient and stay off the bike longer.
Probably not pedaling, when you get off your bike with that seatpost too far up our ass... you probably tipped your bike over w/ your toes flexed.

At least you didn't roll your ankl over, I've seen people roll down the hill like that.:skep: Sux, but funny as hell.
 

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Its got what plants crave
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Knee pain = seat too low


But I dunno about calf pain. I've honestly never had a saddle too high before because when my saddle is too high I can hardly touch my toes to the ground and it's not a comfortable/safe way to ride. I hate having a seat jacked way up.. it feels way too unstable, like riding a damn road bike. I need room to move around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've actually been riding a little low for the last few years because I was using a 3" Gravity Dropper adj seatpost. In order to get the Grav Dropper to go low enough in the 'dropped' position, I had to set the post low, which in turn, still left it a little low when in the 'raised' climbing position.

My legs probably got used to that so that when I went to a relatively normal position with the new RASE post, or even slightly higher than normal, it was a big change to the legs and caused a strain?
 

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Old man on a bike
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G-out said:
I've actually been riding a little low for the last few years because I was using a 3" Gravity Dropper adj seatpost. In order to get the Grav Dropper to go low enough in the 'dropped' position, I had to set the post low, which in turn, still left it a little low when in the 'raised' climbing position.

My legs probably got used to that so that when I went to a relatively normal position with the new RASE post, or even slightly higher than normal, it was a big change to the legs and caused a strain?
I think the changing of a long used height explains it the most, once you get used to having a true optimal pedaling height I'd only worry if the problem persisted...
 

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Top of calf or back of knee? If very high calf into back of knee (calf tendon area), then it could be sciatica, referred pain from a pinched nerve in spine. I get that pain I described if I slouch in the couch too much. Stretch your hamstrings and low back.

A too high seat will rock your low back sideways as your legs stretch for the pedals and could fair up a low back align problem. And the pain only appear in the back of knee upper calf area.

Best luck!
 

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J:
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G-out said:
I've actually been riding a little low for the last few years because I was using a 3" Gravity Dropper adj seatpost. In order to get the Grav Dropper to go low enough in the 'dropped' position, I had to set the post low, which in turn, still left it a little low when in the 'raised' climbing position.

My legs probably got used to that so that when I went to a relatively normal position with the new RASE post, or even slightly higher than normal, it was a big change to the legs and caused a strain?
Well there you have it then:thumbsup: you'd probably remember tippy toeing like a ballerina and flexing your calf for all it's worth to get off the bike... seems like your feet would go numb from the high saddle before you strain a calf tho:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
RipRoar said:
Ya know, Ive been using a foam roller for my back and it works great on hams, calfs etc...awesome way to self massage and stretch....really just works and cheap.

Google or YouTube: foam roller myofascial release

That is a great idea! Much cheaper than paying a chiro as well. Thanks for the tip, I am going to try it. What size and density foam did you end up with?

I had gone in to my chiro and mentioned my right calf having a minor problem and he started massaging out the entire calf. OUCH MAJOR SERIOUS PAIN!!

And he said he wasn't even using that much force. What was even stranger was when he massaged out the left calf - which had never bothered me at all riding - and he said it was even worse. Mind you that ( apart from riding ) that doing regular stuff like walking, sleeping, etc. I had no pain other than my right calf at extreme extension gave a minor twinge sometimes. It mainly appeared when riding.

He was surmising it was from old injuries but my calves haven't been pummelled or had any serious injuries. I need to learn more about those trigger points in the video I guess. Another possible cause is I had added jogging uphill to my routine the last 4 months, which I did because it allows you to stay light on your feet. But thinking about it, I sometimes jogged more towards my toes so maybe that was starting to add strain to the calves?

If any of you want a seriously rude surprise, have someone massage out your calves and you may be shocked at how little pressure it takes to make you cringe in pain.

And for some of the replies like tip-toeing off the seat, etc. .... c'mon, I'm not a total doof. I've got about 18 years of regular riding, including XC racing, DH racing, dirt jumping ... and a lot of stupid FR stuff with my buds. This was a SUBTLE thing. It's not like I had the seat set so high I couldn't pedal or get off the bike. Just a minor change from what I had been used to.
 

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J:
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G-out said:
I had gone in to my chiro and mentioned my right calf having a minor problem and he started massaging out the entire calf. OUCH MAJOR SERIOUS PAIN!!

And he said he wasn't even using that much force. What was even stranger was when he massaged out the left calf - which had never bothered me at all riding - and he said it was even worse. Mind you that ( apart from riding ) that doing regular stuff like walking, sleeping, etc. I had no pain other than my right calf at extreme extension gave a minor twinge sometimes. It mainly appeared when riding..
No disrespect. Have you ever tried acupuncture or a Chinese doctor? Very useful for strains and other problems. Much more so than a chiro in my opinion.

Regarding your left being worse, the left calf is probably holding more body weight now to help relieve your right side. It is surprising how much the left or right side of the body can compensate for an injury. And even that slight change in balance can strain other parts of your body, especially with a leg injury. Depending on the level of pain from the injury and how active you continue to be, this compensation (posture/balance change) causes strain and possibly secondary injury. If you notice any more pain in the back or neck, I would just take it easy.

http://www.thumpermassager.com/professional.html really helps loosen things...the thumper works out some serious pain!
 
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