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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, I bought a GT Aggressor without a seatpost.
So I bought a single bolt seat post.

For any ride longer than five minutes it is incredibly uncomfortable.
The pitch is way too high.
If I raise the seat post high, then it kills my nutz. If I lower the seatpost, then my nutz hurt less, but it kills my back.

Here is a picture of what my seatpost is supposed to look like:


and here is a really blurry (sorry) picture of what it does look like:


Is this a thing with single vertical bolt seatposts?

I put my seat on one of those old seat-posts with the horizontal bolt and those two ribbed donuts on the side (came off a bmx), and I was able to drop the pitch to where I was comfortable.

Do I have to look for one of those? Do they make those for mountain bikes? Are the two bolt ones more accomodating?

Thanks.

(first time poster, long time lurker)
 

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beautiful noise...
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Just a guess...

This is just a guess but maybe you've got the post facing the wrong way? If that's not the case then start by doing the following-

1. Take the entire post apart. There should be three peices (and one bolt): Top clamp, bottom clamp, and seat post.

2. Put the post in your seat tube so that the longest part of the cradle (the "dish" or concave section at the top of the post) faces to the rear.

3. Set the bottom clamp in the cradle. This is the peice that adjusts the "pitch" or angle of your saddle. It should have a shape that matches the cradle with little ridges on it.

4. Set your saddle on the bottom clamp and place the top clamp over the rails and insert the bolt that holds it together, tightening it only enough to hold everything together.

5. Adjust the pitch by using the little ridges as a guide. You should also adjust how far forward or rearward you'd like the saddle rails to be in the clamp. Hold this position in place with one hand and tighten the bolt with the other.

This should work. If it doesn't then I don't know what the heck is wrong. A good place to start with your saddle angle would be to set it as close to level as you can. This will put all of your weight on your sit bones. You can also then adjust how far forward or back you'll want the saddle to accomodate your riding preference. Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Omg.
It was facing the wrong way.
What a goon I am =(

Thank you for the quick reply.

guyplaysbass said:
This is just a guess but maybe you've got the post facing the wrong way? If that's not the case then start by doing the following-
 
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