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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just in general terms, is there a "rule of thumb" for seat height? If I have my seat at a height that is most comfortable for a long ride, my hands get sore in the palm. If I drop the seat a bit, it feels better on my hands but feels like my knees are in my chest. Am i just chasing my own tail here or is there a theory to go by?

By the way, I spend 70% of my time on paved paths and 30% on hardpack wooded trails.

Also, does style of handlebars come into the equation? My bars are straight.
 

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Rule of thumb: When you are sitting on your saddle and you put the heel of your foot on a pedal that is in the 6 o'clock position your leg will be straight. Then when you ride and put the ball of your foot on the pedal your knee will have a slight bend. This is just a rule of thumb. You can vary the height to suit your comfort.

Where you ride makes no difference and what bars you have make no difference.
 

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I live to bike
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gloves?

you wear cycling gloveds? they'll help the palms out a lot. You could also try a low riser bar.

bhhad25 said:
just in general terms, is there a "rule of thumb" for seat height? If I have my seat at a height that is most comfortable for a long ride, my hands get sore in the palm. If I drop the seat a bit, it feels better on my hands but feels like my knees are in my chest. Am i just chasing my own tail here or is there a theory to go by?

By the way, I spend 70% of my time on paved paths and 30% on hardpack wooded trails.

Also, does style of handlebars come into the equation? My bars are straight.
 

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viva la v-brakes!
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Here's my quick and dirty advice...

...for getting your seat height right: First, adjust your seat height so that when you sit on the bike, your leg is completely straight with your foot flat on the pedal with the pedal all the way down. Now, this is a bit too high, so lower it from that point 1 inch and it should be perfect, just a little bend in the knee when your leg is all the way extended. If you ever experience any discomfort in your knees or hips with your seat this high, lower it just 1/4 of an inch and see if it goes away. If not, lower it a little bit more. If it still doesn't seem right go to your favorite shop and have them take a look at you. You should not be able to touch the ground with your feet when you are on the seat! Well, maybe just with your tip-toes. If you want to put your feet on the ground get off the seat and step to the ground.

Once you get it dialed in, your seat height should be static. In other words you shouldn't adjust your seat height to fix your painful hands. Raise your handlebars or buy some gloves to solve this problem.
 

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agree

FishMan473 said:
...for getting your seat height right: First, adjust your seat height so that when you sit on the bike, your leg is completely straight with your foot flat on the pedal with the pedal all the way down. Now, this is a bit too high, so lower it from that point 1 inch and it should be perfect, just a little bend in the knee when your leg is all the way extended. If you ever experience any discomfort in your knees or hips with your seat this high, lower it just 1/4 of an inch and see if it goes away. If not, lower it a little bit more. If it still doesn't seem right go to your favorite shop and have them take a look at you. You should not be able to touch the ground with your feet when you are on the seat! Well, maybe just with your tip-toes. If you want to put your feet on the ground get off the seat and step to the ground.

Once you get it dialed in, your seat height should be static. In other words you shouldn't adjust your seat height to fix your painful hands. Raise your handlebars or buy some gloves to solve this problem.
What he said.
Seat height depends on your legs and should not be influenced by the bar or stem position. Nor should seat fore-aft adjustment ever be used to adjust for reach to the bar.
Too high is easier to detect than too low. Start with the seat a little high, so that you have to rock your hips and/or point your toes down to reach the pedals. Lower in small increments until these symptoms go away.
Mark your post with a piece of tape so you can tell if the post slips while riding, or if it slips down while adjusting it.
 

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the Good Captain

thanks for quoting my friend Capt. Dondo, the world is a better place for his opinions, which are sorely missed in the pages of his once great magazine. now we have "hug the bunny," more about a middle aged poseur ranting about his lack of getting laid. I don't get it
I don't think Don is riding as much these days, maybe he'll spot his own words here and get re-inspired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thank you

thanks for all the advice. i got my seat at a height where everything seems comfortable. the hand fatigue could have just been from lack of riding experience. either way, i am gonna invest in a pair of gloves. thanks again to those who helped. i am new to this and just needed a point in the right direction.

this is a great forum, glad i found it.
 

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bhhad25 said:
thanks for all the advice. i got my seat at a height where everything seems comfortable. the hand fatigue could have just been from lack of riding experience. either way, i am gonna invest in a pair of gloves. thanks again to those who helped. i am new to this and just needed a point in the right direction.

this is a great forum, glad i found it.
Your hands might hurt from grabbing the bar to dang hard. Most new riders hang on for dear life on the trails- try to relax your grip a bit. Relaxation makes lots of things easier.
 

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Streighten out those wrists.

Adirondack Blues said:
Your hands might hurt from grabbing the bar to dang hard. Most new riders hang on for dear life on the trails- try to relax your grip a bit. Relaxation makes lots of things easier.
This is a good point,also is how you have your hands positioned.I have recently had a ti t-plate installed in the wrist so it supports this theory even more.When riding the top of your hands should be lined up with the top of your arm,kind of like throwing a punch,most get their woe's front bending thier wrists too much,the streighter the better.
 
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