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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It can't be that difficult. I have the 3m strapping tape and electrical tape in my tool box, a nice air compressor, Windex and water in my garage, and can find mold builder and ust valves no problemo.

I've read about the mess, but think I am mechanically (not that there's really anything mechanical) sound enough and have read the instructions over and over. I rarely get flats, and run 30 to 35 psi now (mutano raptor 2.4 with 317 rims), but I'd like to have insurance against that one time I do get 6 goatheads AND would like to save a little bit of weight.

So if you were me (crafty and CHEAP), and only needed to buy mold builder and the valves, would you do the diy, or just get Stan's?
 

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Do it! It's easy (I have Crossmax rims though) and kinda fun. I had Mutanos and had flats all the time until I went the homebrew way. One time I pull out 11 thorns from the Mutano, spun the tire around a couple of times and the holes sealed up. I didn't noticed the thorns were there until I got home. I don't care about weight much anymore, but the flat protection is very important to me now. Enjoy!
 

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danK said:
It can't be that difficult. I have the 3m strapping tape and electrical tape in my tool box, a nice air compressor, Windex and water in my garage, and can find mold builder and ust valves no problemo.

I've read about the mess, but think I am mechanically (not that there's really anything mechanical) sound enough and have read the instructions over and over. I rarely get flats, and run 30 to 35 psi now (mutano raptor 2.4 with 317 rims), but I'd like to have insurance against that one time I do get 6 goatheads AND would like to save a little bit of weight.

So if you were me (crafty and CHEAP), and only needed to buy mold builder and the valves, would you do the diy, or just get Stan's?
Do it man. I kid you not, if you got all the stuff, it will take you less time to set it up than it does to change a tube. Just make sure you have a tire that takes to tubeless.
 

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Hmm. I've got the same rims and tires...

I've also got X317 rims and 2.4 Mutanoraptor Race tires. I've been running slimed tubes which work great for the thorns and cactus needles, but I've had some pinch flat problems. I was thinking of going tubless. What is the homebrew method as opposed to Stan's? Is is better or just cheaper? I heard the newest Stan's rim strips were very good.

More questions:

-Are the Mutanoraptors good candidates for the the tubeless conversion?
-Can you pinch flat a tubeless set up?

Thanks for any help.
-Chris
http://www.enduroforkseals.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Chris2fur said:
I've also got X317 rims and 2.4 Mutanoraptor Race tires. I've been running slimed tubes which work great for the thorns and cactus needles, but I've had some pinch flat problems. I was thinking of going tubless. What is the homebrew method as opposed to Stan's? Is is better or just cheaper? I heard the newest Stan's rim strips were very good.

More questions:

-Are the Mutanoraptors good candidates for the the tubeless conversion?
-Can you pinch flat a tubeless set up?

Thanks for any help.
-Chris
http://www.enduroforkseals.com/
Chris,
The Mutanoraptors are great candidates for tubeless.
The homebrew... there are several out there, but you can use this one as a guide:

Tablespoon of liquid latex.
¼ cup of water.
Tablespoon of windshield washer fluid.
Tablespoon of Slime.

Can you pinch flat this tubeless setup? Well, there is nothing to pinch, but you can blow out the sidewall from the rim (say, hitting a curb at speed with low psi, and basically have the tire spill out its guts on the side). With a tube, you would pinch flat, of course.

As for home brews being better or cheaper... I put home brew in a wheel of my friend who normally runs Stans in both wheel (he's a great guinea pig). He rode two hours in 95 degree heat and had zero problems with my wheel. I ran two wheels with my homemade tubeless and brew, with zero problems.

I had the 3m and electrical tape (read original post)... The valve stems were given to me free, and the mold builder cost me about $7 and that does about 100 wheels I was told. It took me 10 minutes to do my wheelset -- strapping tape, electrical tape, press them on tight, stick in valve, put one side of tire on, dump in brew, close tire up, use air compressor (very important), and spin spin spin the tire!!!!! I'm a very satisfied customer of myself!

Here is a link to a basic do it yourself tubeless: http://www.waltworks.com/dev/faq/gotubeless.pdf
I found it pretty helpful but some of it was a bit "outdated".

Stan's is a great setup and Stan has a loyal following who makes him a lot of money. As for me, I'm going to do 4 friend's tires and charge them $5 each for parts and labor.
 

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A combination of DIY and Stan's

I've been running self-taped rims and Stan's goop on 2 bikes for 3 months now with no problems. Both bikes (wife's and mine) are setup with a Mavic 517 / Python Airlight combo and have seen 1200 racing miles (Test Of Metal, Creampuff 100, TransRockies Challenge) with no failures whatsoever once I dialed in the taping. Two wraps of packing tape followed by three wraps of electrical tape seems to do the trick.

Good luck,
Dave
 

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I've run about every combo of DIY tubeless

and I now pretty much stay with Stan's rimstrips. The only problem with the taping method is that the electrical tape seems to be the weak link and after a while the adhesive seems to break down causing leakage issues. Also, if you tend to switch tires around, tire levers can displace the tape causing leakage issues. I have had good luck with using the Michelin hard plastic rim strips over the tape for a long lasting solution with a fairly small weight penalty.

The Stan's strips tend to seal the best, all but eliminating problems with burping air as the rubber strip and latex almost "bonds to the tire, creating almost a tubular like tire. Sometimes it is a bear to remove the tire from the strip.

I do agree that the eclipse system is better than Stans with regard to a removable valve, but I have a set of Stan's strips that the valve was ripped out of that I use with cut out valve stems from a tube to create a similiar function.
 
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