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Slow But Still Pedaling
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Haven't tried a Hammerschmidt but I have 10,000 miles or so on the original Schlumpf speed drive on my recumbent and works great - you can feel the drag when it's engaged but I only use it for the top end (generally with gravity or tailwind assist) and it's perfect for that. With a Rohloff you can get huge range and no derailleurs at all, which is how I'm running it.
 

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CarlosMeatPewps said:
Anybody heard of or tried these?

http://urbanvelo.org/schlumpf-two-speed-crankset/

I wanted to know if they compare to the hammerschmidt?

Thanks
Schlumpf has been around for at least 10 years. Has several versions with overdrive (Speed) and underdrive (Mountain).

Has had mixed reviews. Does not need any mounting tabs.
 

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Slow But Still Pedaling
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One cool thing - Florian is not a conglomerate but an actual human who is available to talk to with issues, for parts, etc. - I was looking for shorter crank arms (140mm) and no one in the U.S. had them and he just sent them to me direct, no problem.
 

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i have no experience with this system but i have the hammerschmidt and from the pics the hammer looks stronger and more compact... not sure though without side by side pics. the hammer has some drag too... my question is how does it switch?
 

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Basura Blanca
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I've only limited experience. I did a little riding many years ago on Wes' Schlumpf-equipped bike during his last days in CB, and I've been on rides w/ folks running a HS. In comparison to the Schlumpf, the Hammerschmidt is noisy and ugly. Can't comment on efficiency and ease of use.
- Joe

CarlosMeatPewps said:
Anybody heard of or tried these?

http://urbanvelo.org/schlumpf-two-speed-crankset/

I wanted to know if they compare to the hammerschmidt?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Schmucker said:
Look at the FSA Metropolis Patterson cranks too. Probably a bit more affordable. It'll be a little while before it's widely available.
Those are the ugliest cranks, no wait, the ugliest part I have ever seen for a bike. I need new eyes.

Im really looking to use a set of cranks with an internal planetary transmission for mountain biking.

On that note, I cant seem to access Schlumpf's website, anybody know where it can be found? Google isn't really helping at this point.
 

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I have owned a Schlumpf Speed Drive on my Wes built Willits for 11 years now, and they are just great. A really cool alternative to other drive systems out there, very stealth, great range, and mostly trouble free. I drop some oil in the mechanism twice a year and they are virtually silent. I had a problem with my original unit after 10 years, sent it back to Schlumpf, and they warrantied the unit (cost me about $250 for shipping and replacement - I felt fair and reasonable). The new unit is better than my original. You get two gears, and they are bomber. I actually prefer the SS bike I also own - but whenever I get on my Willits I have a lot of good reasons to: "Nothing left to do but smile smile smile!" I'd recommend the Schlumpf and am quite surprised that I have never seen another in all these years.
 

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Dinner for wolves
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andyjensen said:
I have owned a Schlumpf Speed Drive on my Wes built Willits for 11 years now, and they are just great.
It seems like the gearing step is huge, even with the Speed Drive. Forget the Mtn or High Speed drive. Have you found this to be the case?
 

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Slow But Still Pedaling
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buddhak said:
It seems like the gearing step is huge, even with the Speed Drive. Forget the Mtn or High Speed drive. Have you found this to be the case?
It's big, but not so big that it's a problem and/or you don't use it - it's like jumping 4ish gears at once, which is useful going up and down hills if you're not always diligent on keeping the spin up and downshifting one at a time as you go up or want a quick burst as you start into a steep downhill.
 

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I've installed about a hundred of them. You have to chamfer the bottom bracket shell to install them. Doesn't make it impossible to go back to standard cranks, but the it's not so nice putting a standard bottom bracket against the knife ede that is now your bb shell. They are very reliable though, but most of the riders I installed them for were recumbent weirdos that stuck to roads.Shifting them isn't all that easy. Imagine hitting your crank arm fixing bolt perfectly with your heel at whatever your cadence usally is. They work well for what they are, but there's probably a reason you don't see more of them.
 

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Uncle
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My buddy rides his "ssS" bike (single speed Schlumpf) to, through and from the trail -- tall gear for getting there and back from home, and low gear for time on the dirt. It's not something you'd shift very often according to him. For his purposes it works well. And yes, never needs any work.
 

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Dinner for wolves
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Entrenador said:
My buddy rides his "ssS" bike (single speed Schlumpf) to, through and from the trail -- tall gear for getting there and back from home, and low gear for time on the dirt. It's not something you'd shift very often according to him. For his purposes it works well. And yes, never needs any work.
This is what I had in mind. For a Fixed/Free set-up. But THe Schlumpf yields something like a 44/73 gain ratio difference with typical 29er SS gearing. Not bad, but a pretty wide gap nonethless. Dingle may win the day.
 

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I'd say the gear difference is more like 3- gears. One fact brought up is that you shift with your heel, and you need to stop peddling to shift or you can tweak / break something or another in there. That's how I broke #1, trying to be fancy. Sent it back to Schlumpf and I guess he redesigned the units after he saw what I broke. Reinstalled and worked great for nine years. Then the chainring got loose, not real real bad but loose. So I sent it back and sent me a new unit (albeit $250 form me...). The shift process is easy as pie with a firm distinct "click" over. I am a SS rider mostly, and I've thought of changing up the Schlumpf, but then I ride it and think that would be dumb - it's cool.
 

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But THe Schlumpf yields something like a 44/73 gain ratio difference with typical 29er SS gearing. Not bad, but a pretty wide gap nonethless. Dingle may win the day.
I too am trying to decide between a Schlumpf and a dingle.

For me I think it's going to be dingle, because the best Schlumpf Speed Drive gearing I can get is a compromise, working out as 32:18 low and 42:14 high... a bit too low and a bit too high. Also, just as a kicker, the high is the gear that loses efficiency.

Dingle I can go 41:16 and 38:19 and be set... close to my desired high 42:16 and bang on my low gear of choice.

I can see the Schlumpf working perfectly if you have beautiful smooth rolling road between you and the trails, and then hellish steep and technical trails!

FWIW, I have a spreadsheet that works out the Schlumpf stuff and lets you figure gear ratio equivalents if that's any use.
 

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I run a schlumpf and a dingle. 33-25 (33 is the smallest ring you can run on a 110 BCD) and a 35-22. The speed drive is indeed a big jump but not at all that un-welcome, especially if you come from single speeding in the first place. I have no idea who is running around with the massive spacing of the high-speed or mountain drives, boggles my mind, although recumbent riders tend to be a little weird.

If you are looking to set one of these up I would have a couple suggestions...1. Aim low on your gears. 27 tooth (or more!) cogs might just be the money. Super spinny but nice on tech single track and the over drive is always there to bail you out when it's at all smooth. If you aim for good single-speeding gears your overdrive becomes wholly unusable. One other added bonus to the easy gearing is the cogs and chainrings will be more alike in diameter which makes slack in the dingle less of an issue. 2. Consider running a 2 tooth drop on the dingle instead of 3. I found that my 35-22 overdrive was too tall for almost anything other than a monster tail winds. If you really feel like you want to rip at 27+ mph then buy a rohloff. The 2 speed gets shifted quite a bit where the dingle is only shifted once in a while (actually wore holes in the heels of my shoes where they hit the button). Dingle almost acts to 'tune' the 2 speed shifting of the Schlumpf.

Things I like about the set-up...1. Still the lightweight (relatively speaking) of a single speed. a Rohloff puts lbs (yes pounds) of weight on the rear axle = no fun. 2. Reliable. These things have been tested to go the distance with little maintenance. No tensioners...just almost every bit as reliable as the single. 3. Sexy. Still the elegance of your single. If you forgo the schlumpf crank arms and chain rings only the most trained eye can see what's going on. Not even the cable of a Hammerschmidt. The button shifting makes it super clean. Someone had mentioned that it's hard to shift...not true. Hard at first to figure out where in your stroke to pause and kick but after a couple days (if you own one I hope you ride it more than a couple days) it's second nature.

Thing's I don't like. 1. There is some play built into the drive in the direction of the circumference of the chainrings that allows for shifting, but also allows for the chain ring to play or rattle independently of the cranks when downhilling. Probably no biggy for recumbent riders, but on tech sh#t, it's annoying. Surprisingly this doesn't seem to affect pickup at the back wheel. (no need to buy a noisy King hub with 2wice the number a pawls) Side-note: Whatever schlumpf is advertising...don't run this thing on your fixie. You'll be out a grip of cash and your tight 'fixed to the wheel' feeling will be gone. 2. Spendy as hell. Unless you're really into single-speeding already (for reasons that are beyond most) you probably wouldn't understand why buy one of these over an Alffine. If single speed riding doesn't make sense to you, $800 for 2 speeds (4 with the dingle) will seem equally ridiculous. The dingle on the other hand is a no brainer on the cost side of things. 3.My crank arms come loose but that's probably a personal problem. Also a chronic issue with square tapers.

The following was something i blogged after running Tour Divide this year with the set up...actually a snowbike with 2 non-offset 135 spaced wheels so i was actually able to carry 4 cogs (2 dingles). With a couple master links I was able to switch front to back without breaking the chain.

33-22 was the other ratio I carried in my dingle….the easiest of the 4 cogs on the bike and I didn’t change for most of the remainder of the ride. Once for a short bit in Canada but that was it. That ratio combined with the 2 speed BB planetary gear was the money. It also happened to be the easiest gear I carried…go figure.

For those of you who don’t know, a Dingle, or dingle speed, is a double-single speed bike. It basically a single speed bike that carries two gear options. The magic of the dingle is that the gears have and equal number of total teeth. That is, (in my case) 3 tooth difference in chain rings and three tooth difference in cogs so that by simply removing the rear wheel and switching the chain from one cog/chainring to the other I have another gear option, same number of teeth means no retensioning. The boys at BlackSheep are the ones that got me hooked. Does this disqualify me from the single speed catagory? YES. Most certainly.

On top of the dingle I carried two rear wheels because the bike is a snowbike with spacing in the front fork for another rear-spaced wheel. On that wheel I carried another set of 2 cogs with a 3 tooth gap between them. They were more practical single speed gears but were unused the entire ride because combined with the 1.65 rise of the 2-speed Schlumpf bottom bracket, overdrive was wholly unusable. Better cogs could certainly have been chosen.

I would say the dingles add little advantage over those running single speed bikes as I only shifted it a few times on the entire ride but the 2-speed schlumpf allowed me to run a much easier gear that would be practical had I not had overdrive to compensate on the high end. I shifted the BB hundreds of times a day. My shoes have the holes to prove it. (shifter button is on the bottom bracket spindle itself) My opinion, don’t DQ yourself on the SS catagory just to run a Dingle. The Schlumpf however, is worth it. Wheehw.

Little wordy but if your have enough of a bike-boner to be looking up running Schlumpfs with Dingles than you probably found in informative.
 
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