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My Nomad..

Size: Medium
Top Tube: 22
Seat Tube: 70
Head Angle: 68 (depends on tire and fork choice) (mine is 67.5)
Bottom Bracket: 13.7 (depends on tire and fork choice)
Weight: 30.4 lbs.

Days ridden: 7
Crashes: 7

Problems: 0, no problems yet. Since I'm 6'0 I think a large would be in order... The top tube is a bit short for my taste. A through axle option would be nice for those of us that are using the bike for aggressive DH/All Mountain riding.

The Nomad

Santa Cruz has built a bike that meets the needs of someone who would like to use the same ride for everything. Most of us have a plethora bikes for every style of riding; unfortunately we can't always take multiple bikes with us on trips. The Nomad allows us to have a bike that can handle everything, it is a cross between an XC race bike and a full on DH machine. Although the bike is not built specifically for either style of riding it can handle both extremes. The Nomad can be classified as an Aggressive Trail Bike and its geometry lends itself to almost any style of riding.

Sloping Top Tube:

Santa Cruz has scored with those of us that find it important to slam their seats on technical descents. Having a sloping top tube not only brings the center of gravity down a but it also gives you far more clearance to throw the bike from side to side without hitting your legs. While riding fast technical singletrack it is very important for a rider to move the bike from side to side without the top tube getting in the way. People use the term "flickable" when describing this phenomenon, I can say for sure that this frame has that attribute. It is very "flickable" and almost feels like you are riding an overgrown slalom bike with XC prowess. Hitting corners at speed seems easier when you have a sloping top tube; it just feels like you can get your body and center of gravity lower in the corners.

Cornering:

The shorter wheelbase allows for much quicker direction change, thus tight corners can be negotiated at higher speeds. Quick hops out of corners are much easier as well. The 67.5 degree head angle is steep enough to get your weight forward so that its easy negotiate high angle flat corners. Once again the 70 degree seat tube allows the rider to put the saddle all the way down to the frame for a more comfortable position.

Climbing:

On the climbs the Nomad feels like a true XC rig. It is very stable while pedaling in the saddle and its also very easy to transfer your weight over the front of the bike when the climb gets steep. The seat tube allows the rider to utilize a full-length post for long climbs. The 70 degree seat tube makes for a comfortable ride while pedaling in the saddle. Other bikes in this category have very slack seat tubes which make it hard to pedal uphill. My bike feels very stable on the climbs, it sits down into the first 1/3 of travel and does not move much while on smooth ascents. If you happened to run into roots or logs on the way up the trail, the bike will soak them with no problem.

Descending:

The Nomad's suspension set up is similar to other Santa Cruz designs such as the Blur and Blur 4x. Depending on how you set up your shock, will determine how the bike performs. I have a DHX Air on mine that has 200lbs in the main chamber and 80lbs in the boost valve. I weigh 185 lbs. My bike is set up for more of a high speed DH/Trail application. I ride trails that are very fast (in excess of 30 mph during most of the ride) with large hits. By hits I mean holes, rocks, railroad ties, logs, roots and jumps.

Set up will vary based on personal preference, intended use and riding style. For Instance Mark Weir likes to run 40% sag in his shock. Mark Weighs 165. He runs 160lbs in the main chamber and 100 in the boost valve. People may choose to run a softer application like this for aggressive trail riding. It allows the rider to utilize more travel during the ride. Keep in mind if you set it up like this you will bottom out occasionally on larger hits.

Jumping:

This bike is killer for jumping. Once again, it's low BB and sloping top tube make it easy to throw around in the air. Whether you are hitting dirt jumps or trail style hits the Nomad will perform.


Written by Forrest
Additional info provided by Mark Weir.
 

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Cynical Bystander
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6,770 Posts
That looks about 150x better than the chrome one! That is one sexy bike. :drool: You gonna use her for mostly trail riding or all around fr/xc/dh/whatever type stuff? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Trail Riding, DH/FR... anything!! it shuld be cool...

COmtbiker12 said:
That looks about 150x better than the chrome one! That is one sexy bike. :drool: You gonna use her for mostly trail riding or all around fr/xc/dh/whatever type stuff? :D
Thanks for the compliments... I will let you know what's up after I ride it...

Forrest
 

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Me gusta

shes perdy
 

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Bike Hoor
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675 Posts
With a coil, IMO (and mine only) that would be the PERFECT bike. Then again, Intense has a 6.6 on the way. Seems as though SC is first to market with any new VPP genre of bike. Maybe that is part of the licensing deal... who knows.

You must be the first Nomad owner in the whole damn world.
 
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