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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a recommendation for carrying a 29" tube, multi-tool, CO2 inflator and a couple of cartridges on my XC bike when I don't use a hydration pack. I currently use a Lezyne seat bag but it bounces around on rough terrain. I don't want a seat bag that uses Velcro around the seatpost because it will rub on my shorts. I've thought about a bottle cage mounted storage device. Anyone have a good solution?
 

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Not all saddle bags flop around, I'm using a small one now made by Lizard Skin and it's like part of the bike, does not move even a little bit. It does attach at the he seatpost with Velcro but I don't see how it would be possible to rub your leg on it.

You could also go really minimal and use an awesome strap.
 

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psycho cyclo addict
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I use a saddle bag that affixes to the rails with a clip strap instead of velcro.

I don't like using just a strap to hold everything as rocks flying up can nick the tube and the multitool can get mud caked and rusty from being exposed.
 

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I have a Blackburn Grid mtb seatbag which straps only around the seat rails (not the seatpost) and is doesn't move at all. It's a small rectangle that fits a tube, levers, tool, co2. Lezyne and other companies make similar bags.
 

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Banjo Brothers frame bag would be my suggestion. They have 3 sizes. I do have a Topeak saddle bag as well, it has straps to attach it. My tube goes in there, everything else goes on the frame bag.
 

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I'm looking for a recommendation for carrying a 29" tube, multi-tool, CO2 inflator and a couple of cartridges on my XC bike when I don't use a hydration pack. I currently use a Lezyne seat bag but it bounces around on rough terrain. I don't want a seat bag that uses Velcro around the seatpost because it will rub on my shorts. I've thought about a bottle cage mounted storage device. Anyone have a good solution?
I've riding with an Ortlieb saddle bag. Love it. No movement of any kind, and has a quick release. It's a dry bag design (roll up closure), and yes, everything stays dry in it. I use the Micro Two, which easily holds patches, four 20 gram CO2 cartridges with inflator, two tire levers, rag (keeps things from rattling), and a Crank Brothers multi-tool. There's a little room to spare, and a tube might fit, especially if carrying only two CO2 cartridges. Personally, I would consider the Saddle Bag Two model if I were to carry a tube.

No Velcro and no straps on this bag. Hardware mounts only to the rails. And nothing touches the seat post so your dropper is free to move about the cabin.

At first I was skeptical of its quick-release mount durability, but it stays on the bike 100% of the time, and has never had an issue. The quick-release is great for leaving the bike unattended on the back of a vehicle. No matter how rough the ride, there is no movement at all. It's the most solid pack I've experienced. I've been using it for about two years now.

https://ortliebusa.com/product-category/bike-bags/bicycle-seat-bags/
 

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If you don't mind switching saddles or already have a specialized saddle they make a saddle bag alternative called the mountain bandit. It may not hold everything you want but it very securely holds a tube, C02, and tire levers. You can then go with the One Up EDC for your stem and/or their pump on your water bottle mounts. I use this combo and it works great.
 

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I use a Speedsleeve ranger on my bike; it's profiled enough that even if my dropper could go down all the way to the seatpost clamp, it would still clear the tire (hardtail). I have a multi-tool, two tire levers, two 16g CO2 cartridges (could probably fit 20s...), a GI Microflate Nano, and a spare tube, with a bit of room to spare in the bottom of the pack (misc small tool, money, boots, whatever). It is fiddly to close with all the stuff rimming the main bag, but it works, and more importantly, is quiet/doesn't move.

The bags are definitely out there, and most of them will fit without issues, since you are currently using one, anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I use a Speedsleeve ranger on my bike; it's profiled enough that even if my dropper could go down all the way to the seatpost clamp, it would still clear the tire (hardtail). I have a multi-tool, two tire levers, two 16g CO2 cartridges (could probably fit 20s...), a GI Microflate Nano, and a spare tube, with a bit of room to spare in the bottom of the pack (misc small tool, money, boots, whatever). It is fiddly to close with all the stuff rimming the main bag, but it works, and more importantly, is quiet/doesn't move.

The bags are definitely out there, and most of them will fit without issues, since you are currently using one, anyway.
Do you have the Ranger or Ranger+ designed for mountain bikes (larger tubes, etc.)?
 

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For long rides, always a back pack with hydration. But on short rides, I want to carry minimal and don't like a hydration pack. Just a bottle on the bike for water and a fanny pack.

I've tried everything. Like you, I don't like saddle packs as they flop around or hit my back wheel (dropper post + full suspension), and the small ones that don't flop around don't hold 29" tubes + tools. I also hate bags that connect to various places as I always find them getting in the way at various positions.

For me, a fanny pack was the best way to carry the essential tools.
 

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I'm looking for a recommendation for carrying a 29" tube, multi-tool, CO2 inflator and a couple of cartridges on my XC bike when I don't use a hydration pack. I currently use a Lezyne seat bag but it bounces around on rough terrain. I don't want a seat bag that uses Velcro around the seatpost because it will rub on my shorts. I've thought about a bottle cage mounted storage device. Anyone have a good solution?
Frame bag. What do you ride?

 

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I've tried everything. Like you, I don't like saddle packs as they flop around or hit my back wheel (dropper post + full suspension), and the small ones that don't flop around don't hold 29" tubes + tools.
It's unclear to me whether or not the op has a dropper but if not there are definitely some good seat bags that hold everything really tight. Mine is s just big enough for a tube (29") 2 co2 cartridges, inflator, a few a tire levers and a multi-tool. I like the looks of some of the clip-on ones but chose a more traditional bag with velcro attachments because you can crank it real tight to the bike and it can adjust to different load sizes, like when you use the spare tube.

One thing I like better about a bag attached to the bike instead of a CamelBak or something like that is that you never have to look for your stuff before a ride. Never have felt or noticed the small one I have in any situation.
 

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Cycologist
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I had a problem with the velcro attaching to the seatpost rubbing me on my road bike (I don't use a saddle bag on mtb). I cut the strap off a bit so that it would velcro down good at the very end and it has been fine; it had been protruding a little.
 

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This WOTOW rainproof bicycle saddle bags is made of high-quality materials that are both durable and strong. It's made of water-resistant materials, primarily waxed nylon, which is noted for its abrasion resistance. This bike bag also features water-resistant zippers for added durability and toughness, as well as being entirely waterproof and easy to clean.
 

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I'm currently in process of having a custom bag made that fits in the front corner of triangle like Twotones. I tried running a small saddle bag but it finally gave up the ghost from getting repeatedly buzzed by back tire when suspension bottomed.
 

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A good option is small pouches that strap to the frame. Usually under the top tube, but can be elsewhere. You can squeeze in some extra stuff like CO2, tire levers, tools, etc. A few companies make them, I have a Dakine one, works fine. The pouches are far better than straps. Skip the straps altogether.

I have a few saddle bags from various brands, all wrap around the seatpost and none of them rubs against my shorts. I use the frame pouch for the tube to get some extra storage.
 

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I will start by saying yes, I was confused at first when I ordered the ICOCOPRO mountain bike saddlebag, but I was not disappointed when I received it. I really appreciate it. Small and compact, that's why you would buy this particular sized saddlebag. Super sturdy. The zippers have a nice enclosure or flap when they close. Helps with waterproofing. Reflective strip / surrounding material. There are 3 small mesh sides to separate your items
 

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I wouldn't be without my saddle bag for all the same bits you have!

I've tried the ones that have a sold plastic mount to the rails... all snapped off very quickly in crashes.

Moved to strap and its been great. Had a Lezyne micro caddy with a single saddle rail strap but in the end the zip split and I lost my fancy multitool and inflator.

Now I use Topeak with two thinner straps...
Doesn't feel quite as secure but I love that it's roll-top and waterproof. Now I can leave it on when I jetwash the bike. However, I did need to trim the seatpost strap to stop I flapping and grabbing shorts. Now it's fine.
 

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I'm currently in process of having a custom bag made that fits in the front corner of triangle like Twotones. I tried running a small saddle bag but it finally gave up the ghost from getting repeatedly buzzed by back tire when suspension bottomed.
Here it is.

fits like the proverbial glove
 

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