Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I got my first pair of rx sunglases and opted for Oakley Splitshot. My options were limited due to my prescription. Up to now I've just been riding without any prescription.

All seemed good driving and cycling on the road. Then I hit my first trail and almost stacked the minute I hit some chunk. I had this extreme sense of vertigo almost and I had no idea where I was.

Happened again and again only on rough terrain.

Started having a play around and noticed that my vision would skew if the glasses moved even the smallest amount on my face. For most activities this isn't that much of an issue, but with the vibrations from the MTB they're literally unwearable.

I'm not sure what this is called or whether it is common, but has any one else experienced this? Does anyone have any recommendations for glasses or will they all have this effect to a degree? I'm thinking of moving to contacts.
 

·
Registered
Ibis Ripley V4
Joined
·
369 Posts
Depending on your prescription you can end up with a lot of distortion once you need to start looking around the lens (away from its optical center).

If you have an astigmatism it will be a lot worse.

The Split Shot is not what I would call a true “wrapped” frame, but it does have some wrap and a fairly large lens. Again, depending on your prescription this can cause a lot of distortion issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I've had similarly poor results when using local opticians. I get all my prescription sunglasses made at Sports Optical now. I've had a few pairs of Rudy Project Rydon's made by them, prescription of -4.5 to -5.0, that turned out great in terms of optical quality. The main issue is the lens thickness at the edges for the wider lenses. Makes it very hard to hide the 'coke bottle' effect. Also have had problems with their polarized lenses. The screens on many mobile devices are polarized and blocked by the polarization of the glasses at certain orientations, and there are residual stress artifacts that are noticeable under certain situations (kind of like the artifacts you see when looking at the tempered rear window of a car using polarized glasses).
 

·
Registered
Ibis Ripley V4
Joined
·
369 Posts
Part of the problem with with polarized lenses is the proliferation of polycarbonate being used as a lens substrate.

It’s a garbage lens material. It’s incredibly soft so any pressure from a frame/mounting point causes the material to flex and distort and in turn flex and distort the polarization film.

On top of that, it’s far from the most optically accurate lens materials available.

With the Rudy project Rydon Rx system, they are wisely reducing the actual lens size and removing the wrap.

The Oakley is doing none of these things. Depending upon the prescription this can be a recipe for distortion and problems. Especially when mountain biking. Rapid eye movement and the frame moving are not good, especially if you have a large lens and a prescription concern.

Once a prescription gets severe enough I suggest an insert based system. I’m really impressed with the newer Adidas stuff and the insert that clips in behind the non-rx lens has proven to be very good in the past.

Poor opticians will blab about how lenses can be made with digital processing to avoid distortion. While the digital processing can help reduce the impact of peripheral distortion, it will not eliminate it. Especially as the prescription gets more and more severe and your talking about rapid movement based sports.

If you have a decent amount of astigmatism, all of these issues are severely magnified.
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
31,245 Posts
I STRONGLY prefer contact lenses for riding and most other activities in part because of the distortion I notice from my prescription glasses. I use those on days when my eyes are tired, or when I'm camping and it takes a little more effort to make sure my hands are extra clean to mess with the contact lenses, etc. I REALLY notice the distortion when I go from the contacts to the glasses when I haven't worn the glasses for awhile. At times it can be a little vertigo-inducing.

I just wear regular nonprescription riding glasses that block a lot of the wind and dust from my eyes so I can avoid contact lens problems while riding.
 

·
Kick Start My Heart
Joined
·
583 Posts
I am in the same boat with lixxfe. My rx is -3.5, and I did a ton of research, landed on the Rydons with no issues.

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
 

·
BOOM goes the dynamite!
Occasionally Cranky
Joined
·
5,012 Posts
This is interesting. I've definitely experienced the effects of the polarization mentioned and to a limited degree, the distortion with my Oakley Flak (2.0? not sure exact model) prescription glasses. I rode once without any kind of ill effects, but decided not to wear them again since sweat and dirt/mud/etc on expensive lenses would make them self-destruct much sooner. I'll have to look up my prescription, but do have an astigmatism as well FWIW.

Can anyone give a rough estimate on the cost of the Rydons?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I don't think the Split Shot is a good choice for mountain-bike riding. You want something cycling specific which will grip well at your ears and nose, that should hold them in place properly. Something like a Flak Jacket. I've had the effect you mention when riding in winter, and my glasses (Flak Jacket) are resting on the fabric of my head cap, and the nose piece is not gripping my nose so well. They (the glasses) bounce around and it's hard to see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the responses.

I don't think the Split Shot is a good choice for mountain-bike riding. You want something cycling specific which will grip well at your ears and nose, that should hold them in place properly. Something like a Flak Jacket. I've had the effect you mention when riding in winter, and my glasses (Flak Jacket) are resting on the fabric of my head cap, and the nose piece is not gripping my nose so well. They (the glasses) bounce around and it's hard to see.
Yes once I start sweating the issue is worse as the glasses then start to slide.

I have Keratoconus which causes a severe astigmatism in one eye, much milder in the other. Sounds like this is normal then, I'm very annoyed since I was very specific with the shop about why I was buying these
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,764 Posts
I don't think the Split Shot is a good choice for mountain-bike riding. You want something cycling specific which will grip well at your ears and nose, that should hold them in place properly. Something like a Flak Jacket. I've had the effect you mention when riding in winter, and my glasses (Flak Jacket) are resting on the fabric of my head cap, and the nose piece is not gripping my nose so well. They (the glasses) bounce around and it's hard to see.
Not for nothing, but my normal wire frames (Guess? semi-frameless) are the ones that I use for riding. They don't bounce/slip, thanks to the ear pieces (sport glasses tend to have straight ears). Also, the "rules" don't apply to glasses wearers, that is, glasses on first, everything else on top. They don't move. As an (unfortunately) life-long glasses wearer, I've come to the point in my life where lens size simply isn't important to me, as I've learned to just not track things with my eyes. My old sport glasses were also Rudy Projects (a discontinued model, maybe? I don't see wire-frames that aren't aviators anymore), but they were destroyed when a car hit me. Previously, my "old" frames would be handed over to the optician to clean/repair, and a cheap pair of 15-20% yellow tint lenses thrown in for riding. As long as the lens coverage was adequate, I had no problem with the reduced size vs "sport" glasses. Since the car incident, I haven't done that, and I'm looking into Lasik as a possibility, so hopefully I won't have to.
 

·
Registered
Ibis Ripley V4
Joined
·
369 Posts
Thanks for all the responses.



Yes once I start sweating the issue is worse as the glasses then start to slide.

I have Keratoconus which causes a severe astigmatism in one eye, much milder in the other. Sounds like this is normal then, I'm very annoyed since I was very specific with the shop about why I was buying these
You should be upset.

Any “optician” that put you in that pair of glasses knowing what you wanted to do and what your visual needs are should be ashamed.

The biggest issue is far too much marketing BS and a complete lack of knowledge in the optical industry. You can thank Luxottica/Essilor for a bulk of that

Guess who owns Oakley...

If you want then for mountain biking, I would return them if you can.

Are you seeing a good Ophthalmologist for your Keratoconus?

because specialty contacts might be your best bet for managing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Most opticians should be willing to redo a prescription that doesn't work out.

Opticians don't know what they don't know. Need to find one that mountain bikes and wears prescription glasses:).

As OP said, for most activities the glasses work fine. Maybe some temple straps to hold the glasses more securely during mountain biking?
 

·
Registered
Ibis Ripley V4
Joined
·
369 Posts
Most opticians should be willing to redo a prescription that doesn't work out.

Opticians don't know what they don't know. Need to find one that mountain bikes and wears prescription glasses:).

As OP said, for most activities the glasses work fine. Maybe some temple straps to hold the glasses more securely during mountain biking?
temple straps and making them more stable won’t get rid of the significant distortion of having to rapidly look through different parts of the lens unfortunately.

When being able to look through the optical center for a long period of time with little eye movement, they will seem fine. Any optician that has a base optical knowledge should know that fast moving sports that requires a lot of movement would never work with those glasses.

His astigmatism is a very big part of this issue and should have been a red flag when fitting these.

I’m not trying to be harsh, but after 21 years in the optical industry and watching the slow death of being able to find a competent optician, I get really frustrated.

Glasses are too expensive and when fit wrong can lead to serious issues.


My point is, the “optician” has zero excuse for such a poor fitting if they are even remotely competent at their job. I’ve run out of tolerance for it because it’s what I do all day. Too many people approach this as a “fashion” industry now. Sure, I want to make sure people look good in their eyewear and feel confident in them. However my prime objective is visual acuity and accuracy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
You should be upset.

Any “optician” that put you in that pair of glasses knowing what you wanted to do and what your visual needs are should be ashamed.

The biggest issue is far too much marketing BS and a complete lack of knowledge in the optical industry. You can thank Luxottica/Essilor for a bulk of that

Guess who owns Oakley...

If you want then for mountain biking, I would return them if you can.

Are you seeing a good Ophthalmologist for your Keratoconus?

because specialty contacts might be your best bet for managing it.
Yes I have been seeing someone good to manage the keratoconus. I had collagen cross-linking done last year to stabilise the condition. Rigid contacts would be the ideal solution but I've struggled to find a set that were comfortable.

Problem is that my optical consultant specialises in the management of the condition but does not sell glasses. That when you go in, see an optometrist and once the testing is done they handball you off to some 18year old to get the glasses selected and ordered. That's how it is with almost every shop here.
 

·
Registered
Ibis Ripley V4
Joined
·
369 Posts
Yes I have been seeing someone good to manage the keratoconus. I had collagen cross-linking done last year to stabilise the condition. Rigid contacts would be the ideal solution but I've struggled to find a set that were comfortable.

Problem is that my optical consultant specialises in the management of the condition but does not sell glasses. That when you go in, see an optometrist and once the testing is done they handball you off to some 18year old to get the glasses selected and ordered. That's how it is with almost every shop here.
Yeah, the rigid lenses are tough, and expensive. It’s an entire skill set just to be able to fit them. But yes, they are typically the best way to manage keratoconus.

The whole “Handoff to some teenager” is basically the crux of the issue with glasses at this point.

They think a crash course in optics 101 and knowing if something is “cute” is all you need to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I could always use contacts and regular lenses in this frame but tbh if I wasn't restricted in my frame choice by my prescription this isn't a frame I'd pick for MTB anyway. So overall it's pretty disappointing given how much they cost. Might try emailing Oakley directly and seeing if they give a crap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I'm a fan of Wiley-X, Been using them for years. Mine have removable gaskets and the retention strap is great! Polarized with amber lenses and I MTB, Kiteboard, shoot, drive with them.
 

·
Pro Coffee Drinker
Joined
·
84 Posts
FWIW I have had a good experience with Oakley Flak Jackets with the XLJ lenses, ordering directly through Oakley and SportRX.com. However I have a somewhat light prescription, and it looks like you've got a fairly specific case here.

-DS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I'm a fan of Wiley-X, Been using them for years. Mine have removable gaskets and the retention strap is great! Polarized with amber lenses and I MTB, Kiteboard, shoot, drive with them.
Are you talking about the tactical goggles? SG-1
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top