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This is my brand new bike. It has been riden around 10 times so far, and washed three times with high pressure water. I must note that this is a steel frame.

Today I decided to see what's going on at the frame nodes such as the derailleur hanger. So, I removed the derailleur and I noticed rust had started to collect in there:

Silver Steel Bicycle chain Bicycle drivetrain part Chain


Apparently water has entered inside the tubes via the two holes you see in the picture. And once it enters in there, it can travel the whole frame from the inside.

Bicycle frame Red Line Font Triangle


While I don't see any possible way of removing the rust that has been created inside the tubes, I was thinking maybe it would be a good idea to at least block those two holes with nail polish so that the water does not go inside the frame tubes. Do you think that would be a good idea?
 

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First stop watching with a pressure washer. Go by any bike shop you will never find a pressure washer there.

Those are drain holes. There is a product called frame saver. It costs the inside of the tubes and protects them from rust.

If you want to wash your bike, a big bucket of soapy water, a nice medium brissle brush, and a hose set on mist so it just "rains" on your bike.

Bill


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Actually with three pressure wash cleanings a complete overhaul of all bearings might be in order.
Just a good lube like park grease will work wonders.
Followed by triflow on all the cables.
Was your bike that muddy that it needed cleaning or is it just new bike needs cleaned mentality? If it's the latter no problem, but if it was caked in mud that really is both shortening the life span of your parts and tearing up trails badly.

Bill


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I use a Hudson sprayer( a hand pumped garden type sprayer) for the pre-wash and rinsing of my bikes. The sprayer provides just enough pressure to clear off mud, but not too much to penetrate bearings, most have an adjustable spray nozzle, you can also take it with you on bike trips.
 

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The holes in the frame are for gasses to escape while it is being welded.

If you have been power washing the rear cassette. It would be best to take the hub apart. Clean it really well and put back together. Any soap in there will break down the grease. Leading to hub failure.
 

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+1 on the Frame Saver and not using a power washer.

You can get Frame Saver at shops all over the place. Google search it. For your convenience, here is an Amazon link. Check this bit of info by Surly bikes on steel frame prep.

It is worth doing this if you want your ride to last a long time and don't want the specter of internal rust ruining your sleep.
 

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Steel + mountain biking = rust. Just wait till you pull the seat post out. I had an on-one 456 and rode it all winter, no different. The frame saver mentioned above would be worth looking into but I would just ride the sh** out of it and not worry about it. + 1 on not using pressure washer.
 
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If you're concerned about the existing rust, there is a Loc-tite product called Extend rust neutralizer that makes existing rust inert for the most part.
 

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Yeah, gotta treat the interior of a steel frame if you want to prevent rust. Party foul #1 right there. You'll have to strip ALL the parts (headset and BB, too) to deal with the rust and treat your frame now. It'll be a decent amount of work.

Party foul #2 is using high pressure to wash the bike. High pressure won't hurt the frame itself, but will destroy bearings in short order if you use pressure on them.
 

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Never use a pressure washer on a bicycle. As others have said, it forces grease out of areas that need grease. I just rinse the bike off with a hose and hand wash with warm soapy water. Dry with a couple clean rags then clean and lube the chain, cables and pedals.
 

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+1 on the Frame Saver, it really works.

Try this or this.
Frame Saver is excellent stuff. I have a steel frame road bike I had stripped and repainted years ago, it came from a cold wet climate and it was ridden on a trainer during the winter-powder coat had bubbled where sweat had dripped on the frame, it was pretty bad. I treated the frame with Frame Saver before assembly. It is good stuff.
 

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IMHO not a big deal if salt isn't in the equation. Have you already gone through a frame that failed because of rust?

If the bottom bracket doesn't have a cable guide bolt/drain hole, make one. Most of the water in the frame will collect in that one spot.
 

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meh?
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Will the frame really rust out that quickly? I've got a Chromag. It gets dirty and I rinse it quickly after each ride. No power washer, just the hose on "spray", maybe I'll use a brush. It gets a quick dry with a towel and then set in front of my dehumidifier. I see a little rust on the chain after, but it's quickly relubed.
Do I need to freak out over not using frame saver? I'm talking about catastrophic failure or having to replace the frame in a year. Frankly tiny points of rust will happen. I bought steel because aluminum is harsh/ fails spectacularly and carbon (to me) doesn't last long in the face of simple abrasions and scratches. I just need it to be structurally sound.


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In the short amount of time the OP is dealing with, the small amount of surface rust is not a problem right now. Clean it up and treat the frame and it'll be fine.

If you buy a built steel bike, the frame will typically be treated already. If you buy a frame only, typically not. If you don't treat the frame, it will rust from the inside out and it will become a structural problem. The worst part is, you can't tell when, because the rust is occurring INSIDE the tubes.

I got a steel frame for my commute bike last winter, treated it before I built it, and it has nary a spot of rust. I have a couple ugly weather rides on it, but not a lot of time/miles. I have not "cleaned" the bike once since I built it last year.
 
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