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Okay, This aint to bright and I am pissed to seek advice.
Recently I moved from Northern Europe to Canada. Back home I would lubrificate my drivetrain with "some grease", that I stole from my father. Worked perfectly. I would use my bike in muddy singletracks, huge pools of water and the occasional stream of water. After the ride I would hose down the bike and throw some "some grease" on the drivetrain.

I never saw any rust.

When I made the move I brought my bike(s), but stupidly neglected to lift "some grease" of my old man. I have bought different products in different stores and have finally setled for parrafin (Dupont KryTech). My only problem is that no matter how often and how much I reaply the stuff I seemingly unavoidable end up with a bit of rust specks on my chain. I know that rust just needs to be worn of, but none the less it still frustrates me enormously!

I simply will not see rust on my drivetrain. Period. On the other hand my girlfriend is pretty tired of spending her weekends waiting for me to reassembly my toys because I don't know how to protect them in the first place.

Currently I make it to the muddy mountain every day for about 50-60 minuttes and I go through a 100 ml bottle of parafin every two week. That seem like a lot of parafin to me (at 10 dollars canadian).

Any suggestions in relation to which product to use (and how often :) ).

Thanks

Anders Bondo
(Bondo245)
 

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wrong kind of lube

For wet and/or muddy conditions, use a quality "wet" lube. I can recommend Finish Line XC Lube, in squeeze bottles with a green cap.
Krytech is a "dry" lube, with is suitable for dry dusty sandy conditions because it attracts less grit than wet lubes. But it is lousy in wet conditions.
Grease has its place for chain lube. For muddy races some racers lube with wet lube, then smear on grease to seal the lube in between the rollers and links, and keep the mud and grit out. Then they (or their mechanics) thoroughly clean the chain afterwards. Two major problems with just using grease: It's tough to get the grease in between the links and rollers, which is where lubricationis needed. Lube on the outside surfaces of a chain, be it grease, oil, or special chainlube, does nothing good at all.
And, two, it attacts dirt. Sticky grease would be a grit magnet unrivaled by any wet chain lube known to man, and a gritty chain will eat your cogs and rings, and promote chain suck.
I've heard of folks heating grease in a pan and dunking their chains so the grease penetrates the rollers.
Others do this with blocks of paraffin.
You can burn down the house doing either.
Get some Finish Line XC lube and be happy. It's all I use, wet, dry, any conditions. Just wipe off your chain after every ride and you'll be golden.

I simply will not see rust on my drivetrain. Period. On the other hand my girlfriend is pretty tired of spending her weekends waiting for me to reassembly my toys because I don't know how to protect them in the first place.

Currently I make it to the muddy mountain every day for about 50-60 minuttes and I go through a 100 ml bottle of parafin every two week. That seem like a lot of parafin to me (at 10 dollars canadian).

Any suggestions in relation to which product to use (and how often :) ).

Thanks

Anders Bondo
(Bondo245)[/QUOTE]
 

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Buy a SRAM powerlink. This lets you take off your chain without a chain tool. They are very cheap. After coming back from a muddy wet ride, remove your chain, spray with degreaser, let it sit for a while...20 min or so, and then wash with soapy water. Rinse with clean water, then spray with WD40. This displaces the water and lets it dry faster. Wipe off the WD40 with a dry cloth, and then thoroughly lube the chain. I use synthetic: Pedro's is good stuff. I've heard White Lightning silicone lube is good too. Then put the chain back on your bike.

Eventually all chains will rust to some degree so dont worry about it.

Chains are relatively cheap.
 
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