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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

Are there any tricks to running two wheel sets on one bike? I have one off-road wheel set with Kings and Flows and a second "road" set with roadie tires on (front) Salsa Semi and (rear) stock DT Swiss 470.
The rear rotors seam to be lined up correctly but the front rotors aren't meshing up. My off-road wheel set is working just fine and the rotors aren't dragging on the pads but the front road wheel is off by 0.5mm (give or take) and is catching on the inside pad. Is there a trick to getting two sets of wheels to work on the same brake pad?
Are there some sort of thin shims that I can put between the rotor and the hub?

Does anybody else have two sets of wheels they use on their bike? I guess I should just break down and pick up a road bike of sorts.
 

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The IS for hub/fork/ brake manufacturers is a range. As long as the part falls in that range it is considered compatible. I had to adjust my brakes every time I switched wheels. My Usual wheels were king hubs. I would assume the problem would be less if you had the same hubs on both sets of wheels
 

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I run three different wheelsets on mine,and always have to adjust the calipers so they don't drag. It only takes a couple minutes so I don't worry about it.
 

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trail rat
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Syntace disc shims will resolve this difference.



Jenson USA is the only place I have found them. (link) Although they are a QBP product so almost any shop can order them.
 

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What It Be ?
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I'd buy a road bike. FS isn't nearly as efficient as a road bike. I did that for a while with my Scalpel. I now own an Allez I got on clearance as the LBS. Its much better and more fun on the road.
 

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Having more bikes is way cooler too. I envy people that still have rational (by my standards) reasons to get more bicycles.
 

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ChrisJ said:
I'd buy a road bike. FS isn't nearly as efficient as a road bike. I did that for a while with my Scalpel. I now own an Allez I got on clearance as the LBS. Its much better and more fun on the road.
Yeah, I agree. A road bike will be WAY more efficient.

If that's not an option, those syntace shims will work perfect for you. They come in .2mm increments.
 

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******
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Hugor said:
Agree with above .. get another bike.
Those skinny tyres on that bike look so gay.

Gay?? Its a bike dude or dudette.
 

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trail rat
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A from Il said:
Gay?? Its a bike dude or dudette.
Some people are more into appearance than function or performance. You just gotta look good at the trail head, you know. :rolleyes:
 

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Que je suis bete!
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Clearance

Check your current fork/rotor clearance before buying The rotor shim. I use normal washers on on of my bikes to push the calipers inward rather than bringing the rotor out. But yeah, slocaus, forgot the post-mount factor. this is only a propos to isb, or whateverit is called. Adjusting the brake caliper when you change wheels is a very normal thing.
 

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Those shims will work well, also be aware that sometimes hubs or axles have imperfections that mean putting the wheel in with the axle in a different position will change the hub alignment - once you get it set up so that it works in both wheels, mark the spot on the axle that lines up with a spot on the fork so the alignment stays the same - this can be a big headache!
 

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trail rat
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HHL said:
Check your current fork/rotor clearance before buying The rotor shim. I use normal washers on on of my bikes to push the calipers inward rather than bringing the rotor out. Adjusting the brake caliper when you change wheels is a very normal thing.
Except you cannot do that with a post mount fork; most forks now are post mount. The Syntace shims work great for me, since I have two wheels sets for my FS, and one of those is shared with the SS via a 20mm to QR adaptor and a cog and spacer kit for the rear cassette. And at $12.00, less than another bike (I do have a road bike as well.)
 

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Underskilled
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I run two sets of wheels for my bike, it is just the smart way to do things.

I did originally have a road bike to commute and an mtb for fun.
But riding the road bike was SO boring.
I would get to work having been on a bike for 20 minutes, I would feel un-exercised and bored.

I gave away my road bike and made some road wheels for my mtb using spares/worn parts and put Schwalbe Big Apple 2.4" tyres on.

I now have awesome fun commuting, dropping short flights of stairs, ramming curbs at 30mph for air and chasing down roadies.
On a more serious note, I commute through a city, if a car pulls out in front of me I have a responsive frame geometry, hydraulic brakes and a bike that can roll up a curb without unweighting. mountain bikes are safer.

I also have a bit of an issue with swapping wheels.
If both hubs were the same then no adjustment would be needed, unfortunatly this is not the case.

Every time I swap the wheels I have to recalibrate the brakes.
Not only will the alignment need adjusting, the thicknes or rotors will be different (probably).
This sounds a faf to set up each time, but really it takes a couple of minutes once you get good.

Those disk shims look good, I might give them a go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Awesome, thanks for all the great replies. I'll have to order up some of those shims and give that a shot.
I'd like to pick up a road bike down the road but being a large Clyde (6'6" 270lbs) I figure I'd have to find a bike that can take the extra beating. I learned this the hard way with my mtb.

Appreciate all the replies.
 

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Klydesdale
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I think that being able to easily use different wheels is very useful. I have four set of wheels that I can switch between my 26" rigid and hardtail MTBs. Road-worthy tires on one, good trail tires on another, the third are my snow wheels with 47 mm rims and 62 mm wide tires. The last set gets used mainly with Nokian Extreme studded tires. Michigan winter weather can vary wildly in a couple of days and I often bring the the snow wheels and the studded wheels to the trailhead and make a decision which to use once I see the actual conditions.

I used both thin stainless steel washers and the Syntace shims to adjust the rotors so I don't have to mess with pad adjustment. More of an issue is varying wear in the cassette and chain. Using a less worn cassette with a more worn chain (or vice versa) can cause skipping problems. But I find it much faster to change a cassette than I do two tires.

Even with all that I still broke down and bought a road bike of sorts. I recently built up a Salsa Fargo. I'm 6' 5" and about 260 and the sturdiness built into it for loaded off-road touring really appealed to me. I plan to run mainly large volume 29er "road" tires like the Schwalbe Big Apple or Marathon Supreme 2.0s on it. The Fargo makes a very versatile complement to my Curtlo 29er FS. I can easily use the wheels off the FS on the Fargo if I want to do some "serious" singletrack riding with it.

Word is that Salsa is also coming out with bike called the Vaya which will be very similar in design to the Fargo but with less tire clearance. That might be worth a look if you're looking for a sturdy road bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks Klydesdale, I'll have to keep my eyes open for the Vaya. If I had it my way I'd have a FS, HT and a road bike.
I need to stop looking at all the nice custom HT bikes here on the forum. It keeps clouding my judgment! Can't decide between building up a HT or put the funds towards a road bike.
 

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klydesdale said:
I think that being able to easily use different wheels is very useful. I have four set of wheels that I can switch between my 26" rigid and hardtail MTBs. Road-worthy tires on one, good trail tires on another, the third are my snow wheels with 47 mm rims and 62 mm wide tires. The last set gets used mainly with Nokian Extreme studded tires. Michigan winter weather can vary wildly in a couple of days and I often bring the the snow wheels and the studded wheels to the trailhead and make a decision which to use once I see the actual conditions.

Hey a big thanks klydesdale, this is EXACTLY what I want to do with my hardtail and 4 wheelsets/with the Nokian Extremes with 44mm rims for a winter set

I've been racking my brain trying to figure out how to do it with the different wheelsets and keep one bike to use all winter/summer

thanks for the thread:)
 

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Klydesdale
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Bunyan said:
Thanks Klydesdale, I'll have to keep my eyes open for the Vaya. If I had it my way I'd have a FS, HT and a road bike.
I need to stop looking at all the nice custom HT bikes here on the forum. It keeps clouding my judgment! Can't decide between building up a HT or put the funds towards a road bike.
I actually was saving my pennies and accumulating parts towards a possible custom 29er HT. But I also was very, very intrigued with the Fargo and an XXL looked like it might just give me the fit I wanted so the idea of getting one was bouncing around in the back of my head too. Especially since lot of parts I'd gathered could be used to build up a Fargo frameset (like extra 29er wheels!) The only thing I was uncertain about was the drop bar because I just did not like the ones on the road bikes I'd had in the past. Then Salsa came out with the Woodchipper bar which looked like it addressed the issues I had with drop bars. So when I started seeing some great deals on 2009 framesets, that made the decision to buy one easy. I'm glad I did because it's a fun, fun bike.

By the way, if Specialized had their 29er FS on the market when I was considering getting one, I would have had no problem buying it instead of my Curtlo FS. It's a nice bike.
 
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