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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an 04/05ish specialized epic. It has the typical derailleur cable runs that have the housing chunked into sections with stretches of exposed cable on the down-tubes on the chain-stay etc...:madman: I ride in swampy Florida conditions and want my cables covered from shifter to derailleur. Personally I feel that every bike design that doesn't run full-length housing is defective, but that's just me. Anyway, if anybody has any experience on the best way to go about this, instruction and pictorials are greatly appreciated.

Regards,
bm
 

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There are companies that make hose or housing guides that attach to the cable stops, thats one way. You could go ghetto and just zip tie them on. Or you can run the segmented housings but with the sram cables that come with ferrule ends and tubing to cover and , to some degree, seal the exposed cables. :thumbsup:
 

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speedub.nate's links

mbabaracus said:
I have an 04/05ish specialized epic. It has the typical derailleur cable runs that have the housing chunked into sections with stretches of exposed cable on the down-tubes on the chain-stay etc...:madman: I ride in swampy Florida conditions and want my cables covered from shifter to derailleur. Personally I feel that every bike design that doesn't run full-length housing is defective, but that's just me. Anyway, if anybody has any experience on the best way to go about this, instruction and pictorials are greatly appreciated.

Regards,
bm
if you want to run full length housing, this is the link to Nate's series of threads on that, and lots of other great stuff.
I have either drilled out out stops or use alternate means of running full housing on most of my bikes (ie zip ties). I haven't tried any of the stick on or disc cable guides (these stick into the regular stops... I tink jagwire or problem solvers makes em).

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=130064
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
logbiter said:
if you want to run full length housing, this is the link to Nate's series of threads on that, and lots of other great stuff.
I have either drilled out out stops or use alternate means of running full housing on most of my bikes (ie zip ties). I haven't tried any of the stick on or disc cable guides (these stick into the regular stops... I tink jagwire or problem solvers makes em).

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=130064
Thanks for the link. I kind of like the idea of drilling out the cable guides but I'm not sure how to get a drill straight into them considering how close they sit to the frame. Do you have any pointers on getting it done cleanly?

Regards,
bm
 

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I drilled the guides on my Enduro with a normal 5mm bit, copious amounts of masking/padding and a great deal of care. If you haven't already, do a Forum search for 'routing' and 'full length'. There's a abundance of info, including this thread...
Peace,
Steve
 

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Steve,

Are there unique issues trying to run full-length cables with Speshy's down-tube cable routing design (I'm thinking around the BB in particular)? Not having any experience with it, I would think that routing - especially on a FS bike - would be dicier than top-tube routing designs.

Thoughts?

But, mbabaracus, I agree that full-length is the way to go! I'm very happy I finally did it. FWIW, I dremelled out my cable guides. Worked well.

Cheers, Chris
 

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Chris,

The only specific issues that I can think about for single-length outers is the effect of the rear suspension. The top tube route on my 01 Enduro is about as straight and clean as I can get it, the 'kink' at the suspension link is the result of trial and error and gives me no obvious problems from suspension travel. Taking it down the down tube would mean a slightly longer cable, but it's a moot point as the ghetto chainguide mount I made removes my option of going via the BB anyway. I've worked on an 03 Big Hit (guides only, no stops) which has the derailleur cable routed under the BB (I have great reservations about this method) from the down tube and onto the chain stay. I have an 07 Big Hit awaiting assembly (it's going to be a late night tonight!!) which uses the down tube and seat stays for both an SLO and the brake hose, taking a very similar line past the suspension linkage to my current frame.
I guess it's down to the shape of the frame and the amount of travel it has. Using the cable-tie and tube method means you can run a cable/hose anywhere you like on a frame. I'd say just aim for a balance between the straightest possible and shortest possible line from one end to the other.
Peace,
Steve
 

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sealed cables vs full length housing

I used to run Gore sealed cables, but then they disappeared so I started using full length housing. I found that on some full suspension bikes full length housing can produce imprecise shifting due to the lack of tension in the overall cable system. Due to this problem, I have moved back to using sealed cable systems. I'm currently running Dry Cables. Dry Cables picked up the ball when Gore left the market. I think their web address is www.drycables.com
 

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I use Avid Flak Jackets. They completly cover the stainless steel cable, and are a lot lighter than a full length housing setup. I actually took off the bright red housing protective cover, because well, it's bright red. But they do work really well. Cheap too.
 

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I don't think i agree with the full length housing frame modification. The housing stops at the braze-on stops are to decrease resisitance between the cable and housing, and make is easy to clean/lube. Did you ever notice that all the Huffys and Murrays have full length housing? They develop more resistance over time, since the cable inside the housing wears a bit, and the small steel shavings wear out the cable prematurely, and cause a lot of resisitance. which is why a cable usually snaps inside the housing.

The way I see it, if you're just a little careful about the cable running below you, and lube them up a little bit, and after every wet ride you'll be fine. Especially since most decent housing/cables are stainless steel anyways.

You can keep the chain on the biggest cog and shift (without pedalling) to the smallest to loose the tension on the cable, and take the housing off the cable stops and lube them with a good quality light lube, you'll be fine. vice versa for rapid rise.

Also keep in mind that if you file off the cable stops, that might void your frame's warranty. Not sure what frame that is, or how forgiving the warranty policy is, i just don't want to see you get hosed if the frame fails.
 

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I have to agree with lama...

PVD, I really do think you have some excellent resources and great insight/advice in general, but why on earth would you do that (slice off the perfectly good cable guides)?

I don't see any advantage at all, and only a lot of downsides... Is it just to be able to cleanly secure the housing to the frame so it can't slip fore-and-aft? I understand that with some FS designs, that can be a concern with full-length housings, but a strategically placed zip-tie can solve that.

I just run my full-length housings thru dremelled-out cable guides, and haven't anchored/secured it (zip-ties or tape) anywhere, and it works very well. Granted, I intentionally drilled out the guides so that the housing would have a snug fit, and not be crazy loose. Just route & cut the cables appropriately, and you'll be set - if you need it, a single zip-tie or wrap of tape strategically placed does the trick just fine to cut down the slippage.

Cheers, Chris
 

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BottomFeeder said:
The housing stops at the braze-on stops are to decrease resisitance between the cable and housing, and make is easy to clean/lube. Did you ever notice that all the Huffys and Murrays have full length housing? They develop more resistance over time, since the cable inside the housing wears a bit, and the small steel shavings wear out the cable prematurely, and cause a lot of resisitance. which is why a cable usually snaps inside the housing.
Breaks in housing typically increase resistance. Resistance occurs at bends (unavoidable) and at housing/ferrule entry, unless absolutely in line with the direction of the cable pull. If a cable is sawing through ferrules and cable ends, that's increased resistance that is not present with a full length run.

Huffys and Murrays have full length housing because it is cheap to install pre-cabled shifter and brake setups.

Alternatively, dirt and moisture entering the housing causes premature cable wear and reistance. Good quality cable that's changed every one or two years doesn't flake or snap.
 

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I will stay with regular design

I was thinking of running full length housing too. But decided not to do it, I just bought Aztec Shifter cables with DuraCote Teflon for $20 from Performance,
http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=1900 installed the pieces of housing and it came with specially designed ferrules that extend another 1/2" past the cable stop. and now my shifting is great, and the ferrule design looks like will prevet any water enetring the cable housing at cable stops. You need to cut the extra length of the ferrule at derailer and at the shifter though.
 

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