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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was time for a Reba oil change so I thought I'd document it just in case ya'll wanted to DIY. With the right tools, it should only take about 30 minutes or so...
Step 1- Take the fork off the bike
Step 2- Get your tools ready. The only special tools that you really need are some snap ring pliers and the shock oil (SRAM 5wt for the damper and whatever shock oil you have for the lowers- I used Fox 7wt). Some synthetic motor oil like Mobil 1 would work for the lowers as well.


Step 3- Clean the fork thoroughly


Step 4- Remove rebound knob, air valve covers and release - and + air (negative first, positive second).








Step 5- Unscrew damper side footnut using a 5mm allen (3 or 4 turns). Using a 10mm open ended wrench, unscrew the air spring side footnut until the bottom of the footnut just goes past the rod.




Tap both sides with a rubber mallet until you feel the rods release.




Unscrew the footnuts by hand, making sure you still have the black crush washers (and that they are in good condition).






Step 5- Pull the lowers off the uppers and let it drain (mine had hardly any oil in the right side lowers).


I typically let the lowers sit in the bucket for a few minutes to completely drain the old oil.


Optional Step- Add an O-ring to either stanchion as a travel/sag indicator.


Step 6- Clean the lowers and stanchions using rubbing alcohol.


I use a little wooden dowel and an old rag to wipe off any excess cleaner/oil from inside the legs.


Optional Step- Remove the foam rings from in between the oil seal and lip seal. I find that these foam rings get wedged between the oil seal and stanchions sometimes creating more stiction. You can easily pry them off with your fingers.

Inspect your oil seals, bushing and lip seals. Replace as necessary (I highly recommend Enduro fork seals).

Step 7- Remove the top cap on the air spring side using a 24mm socket (I use an impact socket that you can get from any auto parts store since it has no bevels).




Let the oil from the air spring side drain into the oil bucket.


Replace the oil with new oil. I used 5ml of 5wt shock oil.


A slight coat of grease on the threads of the top cap before the top cap back on. The top caps and footnuts are all torqued to 60 inch pounds (except for the spring side footnut which is threaded on until tight).


Step 8- Remove the snap ring off the top of the compression knob.


Remove knob and O-ring.




Use a 24mm socket to remove the damper side top cap.


Carefully twist the MoCo cart out


Drain the oil on the damper side (it's perfectly OK to re-use this oil if it's clean so you may want to drain it into a clean container).


Replace with 110ml of SRAM 5wt shock oil (115 for a 130mm Rev and 120 for a 140mm Pike). This isn't the most accurate container measurement but I'm thinking it's close enough...




Optional Step- You can mix a heavier (or lighter oil) based on your weight and riding style.

Thread top cap back on and install the O-Ring, Compression knob and snap ring.






Step 9- Put the lowers back on the uppers making sure that the lip seal does not fold into the lowers. It's best to put a little bit of fork oil on the inside of the lip seals and to do one leg at a time... Do not push the lowers all the way in yet.


Add 15ml of fork oil per leg (I used Fox 7wt since that is what I had laying around).


Tighten both footnuts making sure that the crush washers are between the nuts and the lowers.


 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Replace rebound knob, air up the positive then the negative and set sag, replace air spring covers.






On your first test ride, carry a shock pump with you as a fork typically feels different after an oil change even if you used the same air pressure. Also, check the footnuts and top caps for leaks for the next couple of rides...

The Yeti content...
 

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Thanks a lot for this buddy. Because of you I finally got the confidence to take my own fork apart and rebuild it. It really wasn't as hard as I thought it would be. I have a Tora 318 and even managed to take apart the air piston and dampening system. I picked up the o-ring replacement kit and threw everything back together.
Forks smooth as ever now! Pretty sweet.
 

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Nice picture tutorial.

I highly recommend replacing all o-rings, especially in the moco unit and the top cap. You can find these o-rings at any hardware store as they are the same o-rings as say o-rings for a sink. Unlike Fox that has their own proprietary seals.

Also after you remove the yellow foam ring make sure that you fill that area completely with slick honey grease. Your fork will feel like butter.
 

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air vs coil??

This may seem like a silly question, but it seems like this is a good place to get an

education , my Pike is a coil 454. How will the steps differ for it, I'm not sure how

much oil it has in it? The explanation seemed fairly simple even for my limited

mechanical ability.
 

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rufusdesign said:
Nice picture tutorial.

I highly recommend replacing all o-rings, especially in the moco unit and the top cap. You can find these o-rings at any hardware store as they are the same o-rings as say o-rings for a sink. Unlike Fox that has their own proprietary seals.

Also after you remove the yellow foam ring make sure that you fill that area completely with slick honey grease. Your fork will feel like butter.
I was curious when flip wrote it initially, now I'm doubly so. Are you guys saying to remove the foam ring permanently?!? I thought it had a function, to hold a bit of oil for lubrication. Fox forks have these foam rings too, right? Same thing? Chuck em?
 

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slcpunk said:
I was curious when flip wrote it initially, now I'm doubly so. Are you guys saying to remove the foam ring permanently?!? I thought it had a function, to hold a bit of oil for lubrication. Fox forks have these foam rings too, right? Same thing? Chuck em?
For Rock Shox forks, go ahead and get rid of them completely. The oil that is on the foam ring is scant and serves no purpose after the first few rides.

Remove them and pack the area with slick honey grease. Trust me, your fork will be much smoother, much longer. Make sure to pack them again after each oil change, every month for me as a DH racer, I go every 2 months or so for my pike if the riding conditions are decent, if you ride through a bunch of mud or pressure wash the bike a lot then do it more frequently.

I don't ride Fox products and I never have so I am unsure about there fork.
 
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