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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've tried "sponging" pb blaster under the bolt heads hoping that some will seep in. Today my L-shaped torx tool from Nashbar came in and was hoping the extra leverage would help. Well, ended up rounding two bolts that will now require some unconventional method to get out. I like the idea of cutting a line across the bolt head so that you could use a flathead screwdriver. But what tools do I use for doing that? Don't have a dremel. I don't want to damage my wheel or rotor trying to cut the bolt. I figure I only need to loosen one of the two, and once I get one of the bolts off I can simply rotate the rotor to loosen the last bolt.

I may just take it to the bike shop. Maybe Shimano is onto something with their centerlock. Hmmmm.
 

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I would try a left handed drill bit if you trust yourself to drill straight or have a guide. If the act of drilling doesn't pull the stud you will need an extractor. Smack it with a hammer and appropriately sized drift punch to shock the threads before torqing the extractor.

If the torx rounded it's stuck way to tight fot a slotted screwdriver.
 

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Genuine Vice-Grips.

Clamp onto that sucker and twist it out. I would not worry about scratching the rotor a little, or even a lot, it's not going to do anything.
 

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Genuine Vice-Grips.

Clamp onto that sucker and twist it out. I would not worry about scratching the rotor a little, or even a lot, it's not going to do anything.
Ya, in hindsight that's better advice. For some reason I was thinking about flat heads rather than button heads. If there's something to grab a hold of do like DWB says.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I tried using a tongue-and-groove plier, which had some god "teeth" for grip, but that didn't work because the torx bolt head is spherical and curved and the plier kept slipping off.

How will a vice grip work? And is "genuine" a brand or type of vice grip?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hacksaw can cut the slots if you are careful. Is the hub blind or do the bolts pass through a flange?
Not sure what you mean by blind hub, but it's a Mavic Cross Ride front wheel. I've taped up parts of the area where the bearings are in preparation for some major hacking and don't want metal specks getting into crevices on the hub.
 

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Dougal was asking if the rotor bolt holes pass all the way through where you would see the other end of the screw.

When you say a tongue and groove plier I’m thinking you mean a slip joint or commonly called a channel lock, vice grip is a brand name of a locking plier that will generate more clamping force and will bite better than a channel lock. Even with the round shape of a button head you should be able to get a good bite with a locking plier, definitely worth a shot.
 

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First of all buy a dremel. You need a dremel. I got an open box off brand for $10. Deals aren't hard to find. Then you can try to square the bolt off and clamp on with vice grips. Should give you a lot more leverage than a slot for a flathead. Good luck!
 

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First of all buy a dremel. You need a dremel. I got an open box off brand for $10. Deals aren't hard to find. Then you can try to square the bolt off and clamp on with vice grips. Should give you a lot more leverage than a slot for a flathead. Good luck!
yup, what he said.. you don't need to buy a "dremil" just get a rotary tool.. there are a few cheapo ones that work,.. fine. they aren't as powerful but are WAY cheaper and usually come with every bit under the sun. Think harbor freight has the same basic one I got with a diff name plastered on in. works fine. Mine was cordless with bits, really nice case unit charger battery.. bla bla bla.. was like 20 bucks shipped. Again no where near a dremil's power (also cordless) or battery lasting, but honestly, I seem to grab it more than my dremil when working on bikes.. just smaller and easier to handle. works fine for what little it's needed on bikes.
Think both Home cheapo and Lowes have their own nameless branded ones also now.

you can use a hack saw or a jewelers file to cut the slots to get a regular flat head screw driver.. or to file the edges to get rid of the dome head so you can get a grip on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I woke up early this morning feeling hopeful that I could remove the torx bolts. I hacksawed one of the bolts to make a slot for a flathead screwdriver. No luck! The bolts are stuck, and to make things worse I tried another torx bit on a screwdriver with a better grip handle and further rounded the bolt heads. The bolts are STUCK! Don't think I can loosen them with a vice grip. I'm too scrawny :pand my right thumb, wrist, and upper arm ache now. The wheel is going to the shop.

I'm a bit concerned about the lateral force I've been applying to the hub when I apply pressure on the bolt head in an effort to loosen it. Is this a legitimate concern?
 

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Not to rain on anyone's advice, but a lifetime of being an aircraft mechanic, I've seen every kind of stripped, rounded or destroyed fastener imaginable. I have seen these in every type of application both accessible and non-accessible. By incorporating the proper removal tool and technique, I have never failed to remove a fastener and I have never damaged the component from which the fastener was being removed from. Get the proper tool to do the job and you most likely with get all bolts removed without any damage to the rotor or hub. Get the proper sized bolt extractor tool and correct drill bit for the extractor and get it done right the first time.

Follow the directions to the letter and consider applying gentle heat to soften the assembly adhesive (Loctite). I say 'gentle' because the last thing that you want to do is overtemp any associated part and damage it further. Exercise patience, do it correctly and you will be rewarded with freeing the bolts and having the balance of your parts undamaged.

Additionally, it's the cheapest route to getting this removed. Minimize your frustration and save time by using a tool that is specifically intended to do the task that you are being faced with.
 

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A soldering iron on the head of the fastener is enough heat to soften any Loctite involved.

If the head is too far gone, I would just drill the head off. Coat the bit in grease to catch the chips if you're worried about debris. Once the head is removed, you can remove the rotor and you should be able to bet a better grip on the screw.
 

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Get the proper tool to do the job and you most likely with get all bolts removed without any damage to the rotor or hub. Get the proper sized bolt extractor tool and correct drill bit for the extractor and get it done right the first time.
Yep, from the OP's description I can't imagine the shop would do anything else.

As for the lateral force on the hub, I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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LOL!! I had a stripped rotor bolt last fall and I literally tried every idea (dremel notch, heat, pliers) in this thread. Finally went to Lowes and picked up a $10 Grabit extractor bit and it pulled that Torx bolt right out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
LOL!! I had a stripped rotor bolt last fall and I literally tried every idea (dremel notch, heat, pliers) in this thread. Finally went to Lowes and picked up a $10 Grabit extractor bit and it pulled that Torx bolt right out.
Doees it look like this? What number bit did you use? Feeling hopeful.
 
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