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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just noticed a slight rust color on the "arms" of my front disc. the braking surface is ok as that will get worn off in the next couple of stops. how does one prevent the rest of the rotor from gathering rust during snow/salt/rain commuting?
 

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Audiofyl said:
I just noticed a slight rust color on the "arms" of my front disc. the braking surface is ok as that will get worn off in the next couple of stops. how does one prevent the rest of the rotor from gathering rust during snow/salt/rain commuting?
Mine don't have "rust" on them, however they do take on a slight brownish tinge...that is due to heat from braking discolouring the alloy.

I ride snow/salt/rain commuting as well
 

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Bedwards Of The West
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You can get that surface rust off with an abrasive cleaner/pad thingy, and then if it's non-braking surface parts that are rusting, any kind of a light oil will keep surface rust at bay... You just don't want to get any of it on the brakng surface obviously.
 

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I have gotten some rust on my rotor, I think it is from the section that stayed in the pad area & didn't drip dry nicely like the rest of the rotor. But I see in my email today pricepoint has my Avid BB7s (cabled, not hydr) on sale for $39.98, so maybe I won't worry too much! Jeez, didn't I just pay about 1/2 that for just the pads???
 

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sevenboarder said:
When you start making lifeless objects your freinds, rusty rotars will be the least of your problems... trust me.:nono:
It's rotor my friend..... And don't patronize the coug! Lol!
 

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No-Brakes Cougar
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sevenboarder said:
When you start making lifeless objects your freinds, rusty rotars will be the least of your problems... trust me.:nono:
Thanks a lot. Next thing you know, you'll be telling me that my romantic relationship with my socket set is immoral and wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
CommuterBoy said:
You can get that surface rust off with an abrasive cleaner/pad thingy, and then if it's non-braking surface parts that are rusting, any kind of a light oil will keep surface rust at bay... You just don't want to get any of it on the brakng surface obviously.
that's what I was thinking, thanks.
 

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Just clean it with....

an abrasive pad. DO NOT use any type of oil on the rotor ANYWHERE!!! Oils tend to migrate, i.e. spread out the longer they sit. A nice light coat of thin oil on the rotor spokes will eventually migrate to the braking surface. A good way to protect the non braking surfaces of a rotor is to paint them. Sounds silly I know, but it does work. My favorite method is to lightly sand the sufraces to be painted, mount the rotor to an old hub shell (this effectively masks the mounting areas of the rotor where you don't want any paint), then mask the braking surface. From there apply a light coat or two of high temperature spray paint like engine block paint and let dry. Once dry take a razor blade or exacto knife and trace around the bolts and the mounting flange of the hub, this prevents the paint from cracking when you remove the rotor, pull the bolts and rotor and remount to your wheel. It looks funky but protects the metal from the elements and is quite durable. Oh and as a side note: use old or spare rotor bolts and don't torque em to spec for the painting. A little paint will likely have to be dug out of em to get the torx head seated for removal. Also try to use a hub for painting with the same disc rotor mounting flange as the hub you have on the bike. Different hubs can have different shaped flanges. Paint between the mounting flange and the rotor ain't a good thing. If you don't have an old hub to use as a mask, then you can mask the mounting surface and bolt head area with tape. You won't get as good of coverage around that area of the rotor, but you won't have paint on those sufaces either.

I know it sounds like a PITA, but if you are serious about protecting the non braking surfaces of the rotor from winter salt and crud, it's the best method I've found. You'll likely only do it once during the life of the rotor, so it's only a PITA once in a while. :D

Good Dirt
 

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Squash said:
an abrasive pad. DO NOT use any type of oil on the rotor ANYWHERE!!! Oils tend to migrate, i.e. spread out the longer they sit. A nice light coat of thin oil on the rotor spokes will eventually migrate to the braking surface. A good way to protect the non braking surfaces of a rotor is to paint them. Sounds silly I know, but it does work. My favorite method is to lightly sand the sufraces to be painted, mount the rotor to an old hub shell (this effectively masks the mounting areas of the rotor where you don't want any paint), then mask the braking surface. From there apply a light coat or two of high temperature spray paint like engine block paint and let dry. Once dry take a razor blade or exacto knife and trace around the bolts and the mounting flange of the hub, this prevents the paint from cracking when you remove the rotor, pull the bolts and rotor and remount to your wheel. It looks funky but protects the metal from the elements and is quite durable. Oh and as a side note: use old or spare rotor bolts and don't torque em to spec for the painting. A little paint will likely have to be dug out of em to get the torx head seated for removal. Also try to use a hub for painting with the same disc rotor mounting flange as the hub you have on the bike. Different hubs can have different shaped flanges. Paint between the mounting flange and the rotor ain't a good thing. If you don't have an old hub to use as a mask, then you can mask the mounting surface and bolt head area with tape. You won't get as good of coverage around that area of the rotor, but you won't have paint on those sufaces either.

I know it sounds like a PITA, but if you are serious about protecting the non braking surfaces of the rotor from winter salt and crud, it's the best method I've found. You'll likely only do it once during the life of the rotor, so it's only a PITA once in a while. :D

Good Dirt
That's a great suggestion, thanks a lot Squash!
 
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