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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just built up a new 14 speed internal hub. I have around 60 miles on it so far and I have heard that it takes around 1000 miles for it to break in. My problem is shifting under load. And I am talking any load. I literally have to stop pedaling completely to let the bike shift. I really hope the is some sort of clutch or once the gears break in it will shift cleaner. But to have to stop pedaling completely...come on, that can't be right! When on smooth single track or downhill it shifts amazing, but with the slightest incline no no no. Any help or tribulations? Thx
 

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ups and downs
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It takes a bit of time, but you have to unlearn derailleur behaviour, and then it's a bit like shifting a manual transmission without a clutch, you just have to ease off for a split second and snap the shift. Once you get the knack you don't lose any more momentum than you do with derailleurs.

The important thing to adapt to is that the shift actually happens as soon as you start to move the gripshift, unlike derailleurs which require the cassette to rotate a half turn to lift the chain, so you need to back off as soon as you start to move the shifter, but you can start pedaling an instant later cause it is already in gear.
 

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meh....
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rockyuphill said:
It takes a bit of time, but you have to unlearn derailleur behaviour, and then it's a bit like shifting a manual transmission without a clutch, you just have to ease off for a split second and snap the shift. Once you get the knack you don't lose any more momentum than you do with derailleurs.

The important thing to adapt to is that the shift actually happens as soon as you start to move the gripshift, unlike derailleurs which require the cassette to rotate a half turn to lift the chain, so you need to back off as soon as you start to move the shifter, but you can start pedaling an instant later cause it is already in gear.
What rockyuphill said is right. You do have to softpedal just for a split second. Plus if you want to shift up or down several gears at once you can. If you stop pedalling you can go up or down as many gears at once as you can twist the shifter.

Monte
 

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I'll also second what Rocky mentioned, plus the fact that the shifts should occur nearly at the top of your pedal stroke, just a touch later in the stroke than with a derailleur.

I'll have to do the soft pedal thing under load (I call it "burping" my stroke), but under a good spin, even while climbing, I can pretty much shift at will.

The 1000 mile mark is a good approximation of when you can expect the hub to be *mostly* broken in, but there is no absolute. Every mile you put on it makes is smoother and quieter -- it's not as if you're going to hit this magic "mile"stone and *pop* it's suddenly a different hub.

One last thing, you don't have any notable friction in your shifting cables, do you? Excessive friction can make shifting an unpleasureable chore.
 

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I just came back from a ride on my Rohloff bike and was paying attention to the cadence/shift on the way home. On level ground there's not even a break in cadence, and uphill there is a timing link between my wrist beginning the twitch to shift and just letting off the pressure over the top of the pedal stroke. By the time the shifter settles into the next notch you're able to keep pedaling. That doesn't prevent me from occasionally hitting the hiccup in the 7/8 shift now and again, even after all these years with the hub, usually when having to make a fast downshift to negotiate a technical trail feature. But when you get the timing right it is fast and smooth. :D
 

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You learn with time to shift when your pedal stroke is down, where ther is no force applied.
Except between the 7 and 8 speed , I never stop pedaling. Of course when I'm up mashing the pedals , I can't shift.
Have you check the oil in your hub? Do you have enough ?
Maybe that's why....

Monte said:
What are you trying to say?
I think he was trying to say that he pedals softly for 1000 miles......:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just got back from a ride on the hardtail. All your suggestions did help. I was concentration on shifting at the bottom of the pedal stroke which is very hard to do because I am so used to pedaling to help the derailleur shift. It was a little over 40 degree so the trails we slick on the east coast today and made for some good wrecks. Most were my fault and not the trails. Trying to learn it shift this thing in foul weather is tought. Thanks again for the pointers! J
 

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Not long after I got my Rohloff, I upgraded to the Nokon shift cables. Pricey, yes, but when you are considering the cost of the hub itself, the cost of the nicer cables to improve shift response doesn't seem like such a big deal. I am not saying that it will make a huge difference, but I was able to make much tighter bends in the cabling and shorten the overall length quite a bit.

I am running the Rohloff hub on a TItus Moto-Lite (full suspension) frame. The Nokons ensure that there will be no problems with the cables when they are pulled, twisted, or moved when steering or when the rear suspension moves. I am still in this "break-in" period as well.
 

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That's one thing about Nokons that I absolutely love: they can be bent into a super tight radius, with no perceivable friction.

I don't have anything so tight on my generic Jagwire stuff that I *need* to make the switch to Nokon, but my "best of both worlds" would have my Jagwire housing spliced with Nokon beads at the more prominent bend locations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
minus9 said:
Not long after I got my Rohloff, I upgraded to the Nokon shift cables. Pricey, yes, but when you are considering the cost of the hub itself, the cost of the nicer cables to improve shift response doesn't seem like such a big deal. I am not saying that it will make a huge difference, but I was able to make much tighter bends in the cabling and shorten the overall length quite a bit.

I am running the Rohloff hub on a TItus Moto-Lite (full suspension) frame. The Nokons ensure that there will be no problems with the cables when they are pulled, twisted, or moved when steering or when the rear suspension moves. I am still in this "break-in" period as well.
I am familiar with the Nokon cable systems. Do they make a specific one to run full housing all the way back to the rear dropout? I have used the road versions and it seems to me that to run both cables and housing I would have to buy 5-7 sets to piece it together. A little high in price at 50 a set. But I guess that is the price to pay when you have a 1300 rear hub. Thanks and let me know if there is one that is longer. BTW good luck with the break-in! J
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
I still think about going practically no maintenance by getting a Speedhub, but then I read about stuff like this, along with the chance of breaking a stay, as well as the shifter box hang that makes me wait until it's more refined.
In my experience, these are things non-Speedhub owners often complain about because hopping on a Speedhub for the first time (or infrequently, whatever...) is a notable difference from a derailleur drivetrain.

Noisier? If new, but it certainly sounds different!

Difficult shifting? If trying to shift as on a derailleur, under load, yeah... it requires a different technique.

Finiky cable routing? Yes, I went through my trials trying successive 90° 'S' bends on an NRS before I figured out straighter = mo' bet'ta.

My personal opinion is Rohloff has a solid product that's had a few minor corrections along the way, but is pretty damn good where it currently sits.

I have to imagine that any further improvements will be subtle, maybe with the exception of this anticipated weight decrease. However, I can certainly tell you that if lost weight equated to less reliability, I'd stick with this original version for day-to-day stuff.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
I still think about going practically no maintenance by getting a Speedhub, but then I read about stuff like this, along with the chance of breaking a stay, as well as the shifter box hang that makes me wait until it's more refined.
It's like if you buy a Ferrari with a leather hard top and you hear people complaining about this and they all change their hard top for the Carbon one , so you wait for Ferrari to sell it with carbon one........:cool:

It's a very very fine product as it is. Me too , the first thing I changed was the cables , but I really don't regret the move , I'd NEVER go back to derailleur systems....
 

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Rohloff...

The Rohloff Speedhub is an incredible invention. You really cannot appreciate this hub until you own and have used it for thousands of trouble-free miles.

It is probably the single most under-rated and undersold bicycle component on the whole market.

If most riders could get over the weight and initial cost, then they would come to appreciate what an incredible piece of german engineering this amazing hub is.

R.
 

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Rainman said:
The Rohloff Speedhub is an incredible invention. You really cannot appreciate this hub until you own and have used it for thousands of trouble-free miles.

It is probably the single most under-rated and undersold bicycle component on the whole market.

If most riders could get over the weight and initial cost, then they would come to appreciate what an incredible piece of german engineering this amazing hub is.

R.
+1 :thumbsup:
 
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