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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are beginning a trail project here in Munising, and I am thinking to buy one or two Rogue Hoes.

Egads! They come in different handle lengths. It's the angst of frame sizing all over again. ;)

Does anyone have experience using the different lengths? I can choose 40", 48", and 54". How to decide? Any wisdom on picking a good length is much appreciated.

Cost of these things is depressing, but I guess no worse than the typical bike part.
 

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We have several 40", hickory, axe-handle style rogue hoes. We just got our first 54", straight, ash handled hoe. I do like the extra length, but it doesn't seem quite as rugged. I suggest you buy one of each and see what you like more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So I am 5' 9" with a 32" inseam. Should I go with a medium then? What about standover? When I'm goldbricking, I'll need to stand over the hoe, right?

:D

I have some lower back trouble. Maybe in light of that the longer handle would be A Good Thing (tm). Then I might not need to bend over so much.

Splitter, it is interesting that no one in your crew uses the smaller sizes. You have all three lengths available, and only the longer ones get used? Is that right?
 

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IMO the Axe Handle is always the best option for trail building... (cutting through roots and such), gardening, that's probably a whole different story...
 

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I'm 5'8" and prefer the heavier 40" Rogue Hoe with the curved hickory handle. The blade is heavier than the models with the longer handles, and cuts dirt and small roots well. However, it probably is too short for someone much taller than me.

Walt
 

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40 axe handle style\length...the great thing about these rogue hoes is how easy they cut bench. They work better than a pulaski for removing dirt to get your bench and will cut roots if needed but I like having the pulaski with me to work in combination (keep your rogue hoe edge sharp and let the pulaski do the roots and rocks). I'd rather have the full chopping motion of a shorter rogue hoe than a longer one. The mcleod is a good finishing tool and great for tamping trail.
 

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Well if we're opening the conversation up to other tools....

I have a few tools stored out on a trail that I'm building. The collection includes a fire rake, a pulaski and a rogue hoe (40" handle). I really like having all three. I clear the duff with the fire rake, cut the soil/roots up with the pulaski, excavate the loosed soil with the rogue hoe, then finish with the fire rake and rogue hoe. Mcleod is a little better for finishing, but I can live with out it.
 

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I think most of our rogue hoes are the 60A Pick-Hoe, but I rarely use the pick side of it.

The rogue hoes are made from much thicker metal than a McLeod. They also come ground to a sharp edge. You can use them to dig, grub out sapplings and cut sod. A McLeod is wider, less sharp and lighter. It won't do any of those things well. A McLeod does a nice job of scraping/pushing dirt around to finish a tread and you can tamp with it.

I find the rake side of the McLeod pretty useless for removing duff. It just seems to get hung up on everything. A nice sharp fire rake does a much better job because it cuts through the small roots easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I find the rake side of the McLeod pretty useless for removing duff. It just seems to get hung up on everything. A nice sharp fire rake does a much better job because it cuts through the small roots easily.
Hmmm....Perhaps I should get a fire rake too then.
 

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trail rat
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Hmmm....Perhaps I should get a fire rake too then.
He is talking about a McLeod, get a Rogue Hoe, I have three.

Like the old Lays potato chip ad, one ain't enough; I have Rogue FB70H, 70HR54, and 80RH just given to try / evaluate, and see if we want more for the tool trailer.

The 70HR54 has replaced my trusty 4 tine McLeod, I still sometimes want a standard 6 tine McLeod, but the 70HR54 now can handle about 80% of what I want to build / maintain / repair. And an occasional pulaski or pick mattock, sometimes a rock bar, sometimes a doublejack, power hedger, loppers, chainsaw, BoB, beloved R5....... Gotta have a stock of tools!

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The 70HR54 has replaced my trusty 4 tine McLeod, I still sometimes want a standard 6 tine McLeod, but the 70HR54 now can handle about 80% of what I want to build / maintain / repair. And an occasional pulaski or pick mattock, sometimes a rock bar, sometimes a doublejack, power hedger, loppers, chainsaw, BoB, beloved R5....... Gotta have a stock of tools!
Well, we are just getting started up here. The 70 is what I'm after. Looks like a McLeod, but appears much heftier. I've never had luck with the rake side of a standard McLeod, and the chopping side isn't all that great either. I'm hoping the Rogue Hoe version does better.

The person in charge wants us to just rake first, so he can ride and be sure he's happy with the flow before we bench. That's why I'm thinking to pick up a couple of those fire rakes.

Eventually I'll develop a stock of tools, but that will need to happen over time.
 

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I have tried 4 different rogue hoe models and I like all of them. I haven't tried the new rake/hoe pictured above, but it looks like a good one to try if you can only get one tool.

Sometimes running a roughed-in section gives you a better feel for flow than riding it because it can be hard to go fast enough to do a good test on a bike.
 

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middle ring single track
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If you only have...

...one tool to carry then the 70H (40" curved "axe" handle) is the way to go. It takes a little to get used to but it's an amazingly capable tool. It'll do the work of a McLeod and a mattock; it digs better than a McLeod and can scrape far better than a mattock.

The main "trick" I learned is that when the digging gets tough (rocks, roots) swing the tool rotated 45 degrees so the corner "points" can cleave deep. I also try to keep the side edges sharp and use them for cutting through roots.

Well worth the money IMHO...
 

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What's all this talk about raking, and roots, and stuff like that?... You people must live where things grow! We don't deal with much of that here in the arid west. Out here it's mostly about moving dirt. My favorite tools are Pick Mattock, Shovel, McLeod.

I tried to get our tool guys to take a look at Rogue Hoes and they basically said Meh. They weren't interested. :rolleyes: Oh well, someday I will give them a try.
 

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70H mostly around here. 40" curved handle. The rest of the Rogue remain in the truck most of the time. Can't go wrong with this classic.
 
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