Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Trail Bomber
Joined
·
260 Posts
It supposed to pedal alot better than the numbers suggest. I saw one in a bike shop today... good looking bike.
 

·
Trail Bomber
Joined
·
260 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,386 Posts
I don't think that is really fair. One bike fails, happens to be during a PB test, and the bike gets dragged through the coals. None of the PB folks can ride like the factory Rocky guys, and they ride this sh*t out of that bike.
It's fair in the sense that Rocky provided a test bike to PB that failed under normal use with very low mileage. So that's really on Rocky. What was PB supposed to do pretend the frame didn't fail? Reading the review itself it seems pretty balanced all things considered.

I agree that it's unfortunate in the sense that Rocky makes tons of bikes and they aren't snapping like twigs all over the place. As a consumer I wouldn't avoid Rocky based on this one incident assuming it remains an isolated case. Rocky has the benefit of a long history of delivering excellent bikes. In the long run this will just be a speed bump for the company not anything major.
 

·
Trail Bomber
Joined
·
260 Posts
They changed the tires to the control tires and left the axle lose. If they wanted to do an honest and fair review, they should have reviewed it with a new triangle or gotten a new bike, and then made aure the bike was actually put together correctly. The idea of pinkbike not assembling the bike correctly, hitting big jumps at a bike park that will torque the rear end and therefore snap it, and then refuse to test another bike over fear of breaking another one is kind of chicken sh*t. The 2 Mikes have alot of influence on mountain bike buyers, and by them condemning rocky like that, due to their own lack of QC, is total crap. They also do their viewers a diservice by refusing to review a bike that we wanted to see reviewed, and in my eyes that effects their credibility.

A friend of mine just bought a Slayer 50 Carbon and I plan on getting the alloy 50 pretty soon. Pinkbike doesn't rule the world, and I have more faith inVitalMTB and Bike Mag at this point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I wonder if you'll see some of the RM EWS team use a Slayer in 2020. I hope so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
They changed the tires to the control tires and left the axle lose. If they wanted to do an honest and fair review, they should have reviewed it with a new triangle or gotten a new bike, and then made aure the bike was actually put together correctly. The idea of pinkbike not assembling the bike correctly, hitting big jumps at a bike park that will torque the rear end and therefore snap it, and then refuse to test another bike over fear of breaking another one is kind of chicken sh*t. The 2 Mikes have alot of influence on mountain bike buyers, and by them condemning rocky like that, due to their own lack of QC, is total crap. They also do their viewers a diservice by refusing to review a bike that we wanted to see reviewed, and in my eyes that effects their credibility.

A friend of mine just bought a Slayer 50 Carbon and I plan on getting the alloy 50 pretty soon. Pinkbike doesn't rule the world, and I have more faith inVitalMTB and Bike Mag at this point.
i'm kinda with you on this, and i do think it was probably a freak one off thing. i doubt it will impact Slayer sales much if at all given the other tests and who else rides these things to the max, like Vanderham and Storch, etc.

i say kinda because you may not be giving PB enough credit. they said they had pro mechanics do the changes and check the bikes over in detail, so i'm doubtful it was due to carelessness. but hey, i could be wrong.

i'm a bit surprised that RMB hasn't said a word yet, and maybe they won't. personally i think they should have some analysis and official statement just to show they care enough to have considered the failure worthy of their investigation and consideration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
i gotta say, this bike is also now on my radar. i thought it would be a typical monster park bike, but the Vital (my personal fav, and the reviewer J Harwood, i rank near the top of technical reviewers) review is incredible.

if a bike with this kind of DH chops can be set up to ride and climb like a trail bike (as with the Instinct BC), be fun, playful and comfortable in a variety of terrain, well ****, i'm on board. i know Wade will be coming around this spring with the fleet and i'll be insisting they bring the XL Slayer because it's on the top of the list right now. the steepest setting would almost make this bike a not unreasonable trail bike by the sounds of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,386 Posts
i'm a bit surprised that RMB hasn't said a word yet, and maybe they won't. personally i think they should have some analysis and official statement just to show they care enough to have considered the failure worthy of their investigation and consideration.
It's hard to do a root cause analysis if your sample size is 1. Assuming there have been no other failures of this type they may not be able to say a whole lot beyond what has been said already.

They may also be thinking radio silence is better than anything they could say at this point given the only failure we've heard about is that one PB test bike. I wouldn't disagree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
there must be very few of these in the wild yet. i called around and checked with the LBS (a significant Rocky dealer) and most shops don't have them yet, or have only just received them in the last couple weeks. to my surprise and excitement, both Dunbar and Corsa (Vangroovy and Squeamish) have them on the floor, and each have a size XL C70 built up. nothing on the Island. i'll be on the mainland in a couple weeks, i'll be sure to get the all important, all telling parking lot test and drop from curb demo in....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,454 Posts
I'm a slayer slut owning 2 x 2017 slayer which I love. The main problem with 2017-2019 Slayer is that they are too light. They are built for a good time not a long time.

That has advantages for me as I can have a light heavy hitting bike. But you can break them of you stuff up big features.

I broke nos 1 slayer on the top tube where the wall thickness was only around 1mm.

New Slayer has fixed that week point by changing the pivot location and adding a cross member.

However they have cheaped out and gone half carbon for new slayer. Wtf? Why, why use a weaker material for the parts that arm most likely to fail? I know why$$$$. Lers make it weaker/heavier and charge the same $$ but make more margin per bike.

New slayer is dead to me because it's now only half carbon.

Rant over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I'm a slayer slut owning 2 x 2017 slayer which I love. The main problem with 2017-2019 Slayer is that they are too light. They are built for a good time not a long time.

That has advantages for me as I can have a light heavy hitting bike. But you can break them of you stuff up big features.

I broke nos 1 slayer on the top tube where the wall thickness was only around 1mm.

New Slayer has fixed that week point by changing the pivot location and adding a cross member.

However they have cheaped out and gone half carbon for new slayer. Wtf? Why, why use a weaker material for the parts that arm most likely to fail? I know why$$$$. Lers make it weaker/heavier and charge the same $$ but make more margin per bike.

New slayer is dead to me because it's now only half carbon.

Rant over.
Sorry for geeking out and turning this into a tech forum, I too broke my 2018 slayer top tube and wanted to make some points.

Carbon does have a higher Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) that significantly greater than Aluminum. But aluminum is a lot more durable in the sense that it is able to absorb more energy while it deforms either elastically (flex) or even plastically (permanent dent or bend).

Carbon's strength is very dependant on the orientation and layering of the fibers. In working with former aerospace engineers, entire composite engineering dept are in these industries to study and design composite components. And most of the time, they tend apply carbon such that the fibers are in almost pure tensile loading (their strongest property). Any compression or shear and carbon is quite unpredictable.

In short, I feel there is no way that bike mfgs have the financial or technical resources to invest in carbon design, develop and ensure quality control at offshore suppliers. As for the loading your bike sees, it is definitely not pure tension when we land on rock gardens or short a gap.

I think these frames are breaking and all the warranties are driving mfg back towards offering aluminum... not just sales margins. But I do feel that these high prices are simply capitalism's fair market value... and right now, theres a lot of crazy people out there willing to pay more than $10k for a bike. Until that changes with a shift in the economy, prices are going to be steep.

Sorry for geeking out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
Why would you ask that in both slayer threads rather than an altitude thread?


Also, I know that dealers had to sign full on NDAs to see the new stuff. They're keeping that **** on lockdown so don't expect the rumor mill to be going any time soon.
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top