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I'm looking into getting a XC FS Frame to replace one of my hardtails. What are the plus and minus of either of these frames? I don't ride super technical trails and don't need alot of travel. Any other XC FS Frames you would recommend?

Thanks!
 

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Quite a few choices

pdxbiker said:
I'm looking into getting a XC FS Frame to replace one of my hardtails. What are the plus and minus of either of these frames? I don't ride super technical trails and don't need alot of travel. Any other XC FS Frames you would recommend?

Thanks!
All IMO - Between those two I'd look at the Rocky. I am just not sold on the flexing rear triangle thing. I'm a slave to a rear pivot. Might also help that I'm currently riding a Rocky dually, and liking it alot too. The Rocky's are all being spec'd with 100mm forks now, so lots of room to make it steer faster if you want - slap on a 80mm fork. That thing will be even a better woods bike. At least worked on mine. :)

Both frames should, in theory, suffer some rear brake stiffening. The Rocky will have a few more pivots, and the Rocky has a bit more travel. I really like that the Rockies are welded in Canada and they have a different feel from the Treks. Don't know what it is about the geometry, but it's something there.

But to the more fun part of the question... The other bikes. (Open ended essay?)

Depending on your budget. High end I would be looking at the big 4. Titus, Ventena, Yeti, and Tuner. (Complete bike $2500+)

Mid budget I'd look at Rocky's, Santa Cruz, Specialized, and Kona. ($1200-2000)

Lower buget I'd look at KHS (great deal at price point on their 4-Bar bikes - $1000 for a very good bike!), Jamis, or Giant. ($750-1300)

There is a lot of cross over from the differnt price ranges. You can get a $3000 Giant or Jamis, but what those bikes have can be found on models costing a lot less. And don't discount some of the 'bargain' bikes. The lower end Specialized's are very close in design to what their duallies were last year. Adding on a new shock on one of those should be possible, even under $1000, and not too shabby a bike.

I'm fond of a linkage bike - I think they work better, but opinions on Horst vs Seatstay, front pivot locations, etc are pretty varied. My skills, or keister, are apparently not sensitive enough to detect the brake stiffening of a seatstay pivot vs the Horst. (I've ridden both). I don't know if it's because I'm in the midwest, or I notice more of the difference in the parts that are on the bike. Test ride to see if this makes a difference to you.

Even on a short ride of a single pivot - I could tell the difference between a linkage bike and a single pivot. Back in June. Had another guy riding a nice Superlight, traded bikes for a couple of miles. NICE bike, but the compromises he made were different than the ones I made. Some things I was willing to forgo he wasn't, and vice versa.

Good luck!

JmZ
 

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JmZ said:
All IMO - Between those two I'd look at the Rocky. I am just not sold on the flexing rear triangle thing.
Fuels do have pivots. I think maybe the original ones didn't...

Like JmZ said, go out and ride them. There are so many different designs that it would be impossible to know what you will like best without some long test rides.

I have a Fuel 90, so I can tell you the pluses of the Fuel, IMO, are it's responsiveness and efficient pedaling. It's great for XC, and exactly what I was looking for. The ride is on the harsh side though.
 

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prlundberg said:
Fuels do have pivots. I think maybe the original ones didn't...

Like JmZ said, go out and ride them. There are so many different designs that it would be impossible to know what you will like best without some long test rides.

I have a Fuel 90, so I can tell you the pluses of the Fuel, IMO, are it's responsiveness and efficient pedaling. It's great for XC, and exactly what I was looking for. The ride is on the harsh side though.
Not quite. The Fuel suspensions are the same now as the originals....just the materials have changed. Fuels are a modified 4-bar where the 4th pivot is replaced by stays that are designed to flex (very small movement and only near full travel). It works well. The Element is a 4-bar using a seat stay pivot. Both bike's suspensions act like a single pivot....the Element a little more than the Fuel.

Both bikes will exhibit substantial lockout of the rear suspension while braking.

THe Element will be slightly more plush than the Fuel, while the Fuel will haev less lateral flex on the rear end.

They're both good bikes.
 
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