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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just noticed my Yari not compressing properly. It compresses for the first half inch or so somewhat normally but then gets abnormally stiff. I've removed the air and it still has a fair bit of friction bottoming out.

I noticed when I tipped it upside down it and back over it compressed very smoothly with little force for only the first few pumps, then went back to being very stiff.

Prior to this issue it was making a squeak sound upon quick compression - ie hitting a curb at high speed.

Could it be fixed by simply doing a lower leg service?

Was last serviced about a year ago by the previous owner.
 

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Possibly air migration into lower legs. When you let the air out does it still stay extended or support you weight?
 

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Short-Change-Hero
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Other thing it could be is that the seals internally are rather dry and thus you are getting the noted "stiction" that many RS and FOX forks have. Mine has a similar issue where I can slowly add weight to the front end and the fork will compress in a "notchy" fashion where it drops 5-10mm, stops, another 5-10mm with more pressure, stops, and so on. If I decide to keep my Yari I will be tearing it down to add a fresh coating and oil change as well as converting over to the SKF Green wipers or going with PUSH wipers.
 

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Sounds like a damper problem to me...like maybe the compression knob is wack?
Agreed. This used to happen a lot with moco forks when the damper broke. The knob shows its open, but the plate is closed. Turning it upside down bypasses the damper until the oil drains back, then its back to basically locked out.

If you want to check/verify this, remove the moco damper. It should move smoothly. If so, you need a new damper... and its a great time for the charger upgrade.
 

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Agreed. This used to happen a lot with moco forks when the damper broke. The knob shows its open, but the plate is closed. Turning it upside down bypasses the damper until the oil drains back, then its back to basically locked out.

If you want to check/verify this, remove the moco damper. It should move smoothly. If so, you need a new damper... and its a great time for the charger upgrade.
This sounds most likely to me
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Agreed. This used to happen a lot with moco forks when the damper broke. The knob shows its open, but the plate is closed. Turning it upside down bypasses the damper until the oil drains back, then its back to basically locked out.

If you want to check/verify this, remove the moco damper. It should move smoothly. If so, you need a new damper... and its a great time for the charger upgrade.
Will try this. Cheers.
 

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If so, you need a new damper... and its a great time for the charger upgrade.
Madness to opt for the marginal gains a charger damper offers when you could send that chassis off to avalanche and have a better fork than anything you could buy.
 

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That's almost a $225 price bump over the newest charger damper. That's a bit much for some people.
Not to mention the downtime one would have from sending the fork/damper off to a tuner. Yes something that would better be done in the off season, but many here are looking for the best, cheap solution they can come across. For most that will be an upgrade in damper alone that will make a major change from what they are seeing.
 

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That's almost a $225 price bump over the newest charger damper. That's a bit much for some people.
Yeah but replacing a crappy damper with a slightly less crappy damper is a waste of money, no? Might as well save up for something that's really created for your weight/riding style.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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That's almost a $225 price bump over the newest charger damper. That's a bit much for some people.
Except it's money well spent and spending money on the charger is basically throwing it away considering the performance. Plus, it's so easy to service the avy cart, you just unbolt top cap, turn upside down, catch oil in pan, measure same amount of oil, put back in fork. This alone saves you tons of hassle bleeding the cart for the lackluster performance. It's also something where you can "take" the damper with you when you change fork chassis. I wore out my Lyrik chassis, steerer and crown connection, so I got a Yari boost chassis, which had all the same dimensions as far as the damping cart, and bolted it right up.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Not to mention the downtime one would have from sending the fork/damper off to a tuner. Yes something that would better be done in the off season, but many here are looking for the best, cheap solution they can come across. For most that will be an upgrade in damper alone that will make a major change from what they are seeing.
Installing the avy is one of the easiest "conversions", you don't have to take apart dampers, bleed, use shock clamps, etc. You just unbolt the bottom footnut, unbolt the top cap, yank everything out, replace with avy damper. If you are sending it off to have this done, you shouldn't be adjusting any part of your bike, as it's likely far above your mechanical competency.
 

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Installing the avy is one of the easiest "conversions", you don't have to take apart dampers, bleed, use shock clamps, etc. You just unbolt the bottom footnut, unbolt the top cap, yank everything out, replace with avy damper. If you are sending it off to have this done, you shouldn't be adjusting any part of your bike, as it's likely far above your mechanical competency.
Actually that is not necessarily true. Some people would rather spend the money to have this done as they may not have the TIME to go through the process themselves. Yes there is downtime associated with both, but much easier for someone to send off the fork to be handled while on vacation, business trip, etc. than take the time to do it while they are home potentially eating into other precious hours. Remember, it doesn't always come down to mechanical aptitude but the other currency out there, which is TIME.

On top of that, some people just don't like to tinker, or don't have the available space to do that kind of stuff and thus, again, it is easier to send it off. I don't doubt that it is probably the EASIEST conversion but looking at it from a cost perspective for someone that may not have a lot of money to spend, the $400+ for the cartridge may or may not be worthwhile. The ability of it to be swapped to another 35mm chassis of the same dimensions IS a benefit down the road, but that is looking at it as a long term investment with the assumption that RS or FOX (whomever you buy your fork from) will keep that same chassis design in perpitude with the ever changing technology.

Careful with broad and vague assumptions, not everyone has the space, money, time, etc. to handle the same things you do. Nor do they have the same mindset as you, while the $400+ for the Avy cartridge is a justifiable expense for you, the next guy may have just spent his wad on an entire new bike (most he could afford) only to find that the fork, shock, wheels, drivetrain or whatever is not what he/she expected and needs a cheap upgrade to work as a stop gap. I know people who can throw around a grand or two to try new things out and have "extra" parts laying around, good for them and I aspire to be there one day but currently am not so I gotta deal with what I can get.

Main thing is that no one thing is right or wrong here... How does the saying going?
Opinions are like @$$holes, everyone has one. But that does not make yours any prettier (or more right) than the others.
 

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kneecap
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I'm kinda with Jayem on this. If you have the ability to unbolt the brake , stem, & wheel, & remove head tube bearings + package a fork up and then reinstall & adjust all that when the fork returns, seems like you would have the ability to remove & reinstall one side cartridge in a fork?
 

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time
expense
Time- fair, but the proposed alternative is replacing the damper anyway. Both operations take a similar amount of time and competence, so i don't think your point holds up.

Expense- duder has a damper already. Once you've decided to replace the damper... why not get one that's a proper upgrade?

If he wants the cheapest and easiest solution then he pays someone to rebuild the yari. Fact.

Regardless, he's got a fork that hasn't had the bath oil changed in a year. Change your bath oil, dude! It's pointless to speculate until its done.
 

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Time- fair, but the proposed alternative is replacing the damper anyway. Both operations take a similar amount of time and competence, so i don't think your point holds up.

Expense- duder has a damper already. Once you've decided to replace the damper... why not get one that's a proper upgrade?

If he wants the cheapest and easiest solution then he pays someone to rebuild the yari. Fact.

Regardless, he's got a fork that hasn't had the bath oil changed in a year. Change your bath oil, dude! It's pointless to speculate until its done.
Completely agree. Another thing to remember, removing/changing things like brakes, stem, handlebars, all use allen keys, which most people have. A large socket to remove the damper (think the 35mm stanchions take like a 27mm non-chamfered flat face socket) is a bit more of a "specialized" tool. I know I am just throwing things out there but again, you are correct in that if he wants "Cheap and Easy" then take it to someone to rebuild and be done with it.

No real right or wrong answer here, just what is more important to someone.
 
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