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Hello,

I have a new ZEB.
It was astounding to find out that not like in previous years in RS fork line, the front wheel hub is NOT seating snug in its place inside the fork, but have to find the correct location to insert the axle thru ...
The diameter of the machining area increased to 31mm Vs. 21mm in the older forks and Fox.

Now, it is less continuous to install the front wheel. And I wonder if it is just a preparation for a future new
stronger axle to replace the 15mm one (!?)

Any ideas ?

Cheers.
 

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That is the “new” torque cap standard that allows for a wider interface with specially designed hub end caps. Maybe about 5 years old? RS has been rolling it out for all of their forks but I’m not sure anyone else has picked it up
 

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RS torque caps have been around for a while. While their torque cap fork dropouts may not sit perfectly flush with regualr front hub end caps, rest assured that it's completely fine. The idea is that the larger dropout interface increases stiffness.
 

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I agree with everyone above but will add that you can use your old hub setup with the new fork standard without any problems. There's no downside re performance, but it's a little harder to seat the hub in the right spot. If you get torque caps then the hub will seat easily in the fork, and you should get some additional stiffness through the fork/hub assembly, but I haven't heard of anyone noticing a significant difference in stiffness.
 

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There's no downside re performance...
Actually there is. The end caps will not take the load when they are smaller than the dropouts, so all of the shear forces ends up on the axle. I noticed a lot more brake rubbing until I installed the Newmen adapter thingies. So everything moves a bit more without the support from the dropouts.
Doesn't have to be a problem though, but it's kind of funny that an "invention" meant to increase stiffness will lower stiffness unless you change your end caps.
 

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Actually there is. The end caps will not take the load when they are smaller than the dropouts, so all of the shear forces ends up on the axle. I noticed a lot more brake rubbing until I installed the Newmen adapter thingies. So everything moves a bit more without the support from the dropouts.
Doesn't have to be a problem though, but it's kind of funny that an "invention" meant to increase stiffness will lower stiffness unless you change your end caps.
The clamped contact patch should be the same for a non - torque hub in a non - torque fork versus the same hub in a torque fork. I've never noticed any difference and you are the first person I've heard from who noticed a difference. There may be different factors that come into play with different non torque hubs and forks.
 

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The clamped contact patch should be the same for a non - torque hub in a non - torque fork versus the same hub in a torque fork. I've never noticed any difference and you are the first person I've heard from who noticed a difference. There may be different factors that come into play with different non torque hubs and forks.
The clamp force from tightening the axle is not enough to generate enough friction, unless you tighten it crazy hard (which it isn't designed for). If the axle was intended to take the shear force, RS wouldn't bother with the whole "torque caps" thing since it would then make no difference. ;)
I don't notice any other difference than brake rubbing, which possibly would not be there with a brake with just a tiny bit more clearance, or an axle with a less sloppy fit. But it shows than things are moving around when they should not.

The whole idea with dropouts isn't to make installing the wheel easier, but to distribute shear and bending forces to the end caps (that are parts of the sturdier hub axle) instead of the thru axle (that is mainly intended to introduce clamping force). Yes, if you tighten the axle hard as f*ck, friction will transfer more of those forces, but you might also introduce other problems like messing with the bearing preload.
 

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The funny thing is those torque caps are an attempt to bring back the rigidity of 20x110. So silly 20mm isn't being used for long travel single crowns. It's almost as if the industry goes out of its way to avoid compatibility. When fox was offering convertible 15or20mm forks their own data claimed a 17% increase in rigidity I think. If we can increase chassis rigidity nearly 20% by just using the 20mm standard what's the point of 15mm? Beating a dead horse I know.
 
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