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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this Judy XC fork on a 1998 Specialized Stump Jumper M2 Comp. As far as I can tell, it is the original fork. Can anybody tell me what year the fork is? I'm guessing that it is a 1998, I know it isn't a 1997 because those didn't have the disc brake mounts, this one does. I am starting to get a bit of oil leaking out of the bottom of the fork, so I am wondering, is it worth it to pursue the parts that I might need for a rebuild? What would be a decent replacement fork that wouldn't break the bank? I mostly just ride old logging trails and on the streets these days. I have about $300 that I can spend either way, maybe a tad more. Thanks.
 

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The hard part of older Rock Shox forks is finding parts. Hippie Tech might have a connection to getting parts. You might try them. From the pics the fork looks to be in good condition. Contact Hippie Tech and see what they will charge.

$300 is a pretty good amount of change the only thing is most decent forks now cost way more. Another thing is the newer forks don't have Canti studs for your brakes.

Try Hippie Tech.
 

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i would just get a new fork. jensonusa has the manitou drake comp or air for 150-180. pickup the hayes stroker disc brake for 70 and there goes your 300. could also get bb7 brakes for 40-45
 

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bbrins said:
I have this Judy XC fork on a 1998 Specialized Stump Jumper M2 Comp. As far as I can tell, it is the original fork. Can anybody tell me what year the fork is? I'm guessing that it is a 1998, I know it isn't a 1997 because those didn't have the disc brake mounts, this one does. I am starting to get a bit of oil leaking out of the bottom of the fork, so I am wondering, is it worth it to pursue the parts that I might need for a rebuild? What would be a decent replacement fork that wouldn't break the bank? I mostly just ride old logging trails and on the streets these days. I have about $300 that I can spend either way, maybe a tad more. Thanks.
Is it leaking from the drive side or non-drive side leg? The 1998 Judy XC used a non-serviceable cartridge in the drive side leg. But the 1998 also used 10cc's of "splash lubrication" in both legs. If you have a minor seepage happening, it may just be the splash lubrication weeping out of the bottom of the fork. No big deal, in fact you can just pull the lowers and check the cartridge, if its not leaking then just lube up the bushings with Judy Butter or Slick Honey and your good to go. If the cartridge is in fact blown...THEN start looking for a new fork.
:thumbsup:
 

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MaukaRunner said:
$300 is a pretty good amount of change the only thing is most decent forks now cost way more..
No they don't. I'm pretty sure a tora 318 solo air >>>> 98 judy and it can be had for under $200, check deals forum. recon is same price. Like hell if I'm gonna pay $300 for a 10 yr old fork even if it is mint.
 

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As much as we liked our Judys back in the day, they just don't compare in performance to modern forks so you want to be careful about spending too much money in trying to keep em running. It may be just a matter of an o-ring or crush washer (I'm not sure what RS used in 98) to stop the leak, but you don't want to go much beyond that. Take it apart and take a look, you probably need to add/change oil anyway. You may be able to find a close-enough o-ring or seal at the hardware store to fix it.

There have been a lot of good deals on forks in the past few months so if you find a good deal on the right fork, you may want to just jump on it. You probably want to limit your search to 80mm forks. The main downside to moving from a Judy to a modern fork is that most of the modern forks are heavier than the Judy's were. I think my '96 Judy was between 3 - 3.5 pounds. You also need to decide if you want to limit your search to forks with brake posts, or if you are willing to put a disc up front (will require a new front hub).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's a bit of good news, the seepage is coming from the non-drive side, so it isn't from the cartridge. The problem is that I have been looking at new forks and now this $300 is burning a hole in my pocket.:D I was kind of leaning towards getting a RS Tora 318 Solo Air, but I hadn't noticed the price on the R7 before, I might just go with that. I think that the current fork is an 80mm, do ya'll think that 100mm would throw it off too much? Or can the travel on the R7 be reduced by changing out a spacer like the RS Tora air?

Thanks for the information guys. If I seem a bit ignorant about suspension, it is because until about a year ago, the last suspension fork I owned was a Manitou 2(?), so there's a tiny gap between the technologies. I have had this Stump Jumper for about 6 months.
 

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Unless your fork is compressed in that blurry photo, it looks more like 63mm to me. Going from 63 to 100 would be a pretty big jump, especially because the axle-to-crown on the old Judys were relatively lower anyway (so it would be more than a 37mm increase). You should measure the axle-to-crown on your existing fork to figure what your starting point is.
The Tora 318 is a good fork, just be prepared it's going to be a lot heavier than your Judy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I guess that R7 wasn't meant for me anyway, the price jumped up by over $150 overnight. I think you're right about it being 63mm, I just compared the axle to crown measurement to some old specs I googled. Axle to crown on my fork is around 422mm. Screw it, I think I will just use it as is for now and later on I can get a more modern frame that I can get a fork for without screwing up geometry too much. I already have a couple of people that offered to buy the old fork for parts.

Out of curiosity, I just temporarily swapped a 100mm Tora from another bike, it raised the standover height to a rather snug fit. I think I might just be better off stripping the frame and swapping parts to a newer frame/fork. I haven't owned, ridden, or wrenched it long enough to have grown attached to it anyway.

Sorry for the rambling.
 

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Stumpjumpers have always been pretty decent frames, so unless you really want a truly modern bike (disc brakes, longer travel) it still may be worth replacing the fork, especially if the frame fits you well. There were some really nice deals in recent months, but it does look like a lot of them are gone now. There are a couple of 80mm R7s with brake posts on ebay now for around 300 (plus about 50 shipping). There have been better deals than that recently, but that's still pretty good, especially considering the limited options for 80mm forks with brake posts. If you can patch your current fork enough to buy you some time, you can probably find a better deal eventually. You can also try looking for used forks, but if you're not prepared to do a rebuild, you may just end up with another leaky fork.
 
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