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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had a go at removing Rock Shox Bushings themselves??

I understand it’s not recommended without the expensive and fiddly Rock Shox tool, but I’m sure someone has had a crack at it themselves.

Making your own installation tool on the lathe should be reasonably easy, but making a puller might be a bit more problematic. :p

I have a horrible feeling that they're likely to be pressed in using a hydraulic press, which would just about make things impossible with hand tools...

Anyone tried it??

Cheers.
 

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Haven't done it yet, but yes as you guessed the RS removal tool (specific to which fork u have) is require unless you're a person that works with machining and mechanics and could fashion up the tool (which I beleve would actually cost more than just buying it). U don't need to have any fancy press to get them installed, just the right tool. Download the bushing service manual and you'll get full instructions.
 

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You can go to Rock Shox web site as suggested earlier the instructions are right there. The removal tool looks like it could be made up, the insertion tools are special. I like doing my own work but for something like this i would say disassemble fork go the LBS have them r&r bushings then go home & reassemble.
 

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the special tools are expensive.

i was wondering about taking a slide hammer and rigging up a catch for the bushings. a spring loaded, cable withdrawn butterfly on the end of a shaft bolted to the hammer. would eliminate tool specialization too since you wouldnt need specific diameter extractors.

for insertion, an adaquate diameter alu rod or steel pipe or whatever. that part shouldnt be difficult.
 

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drunkle said:
the special tools are expensive.i was wondering about taking a slide hammer and rigging up a catch for the bushings. a spring loaded, cable withdrawn butterfly on the end of a shaft bolted to the hammer. would eliminate tool specialization too since you wouldnt need specific diameter extractors. for insertion, an adaquate diameter alu rod or steel pipe or whatever. that part shouldnt be difficult.
Sounds like you have been working this through last couple days. The insertion is the tricky part, getting the proper sizes as you know. Think aluminum or plastic.
 

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dogonfr said:
Sounds like you have been working this through last couple days. The insertion is the tricky part, getting the proper sizes as you know. Think aluminum or plastic.
not really, just a flash of inspiration. when the time comes that such service needs to be done, i might pursue it. but between the cost of new bushings (if they can be had), the time/effort required to install, it'd probably be better just to buy another (used) fork.
 

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dogonfr said:
Bushings shouldnt be that expensive & let the LBS install them. Sometimes it's easier to pass something on the the ones that are setup to handle the job, cheaper in the long run.
yeah, but i dont think it would cost much for the hardware to make tools. the bushings, i think were 30 (for a year later model, anyway, cant find em for 98 sid... not that i need em atm), figure labor to be at least another 30, more if you have to ship out because there arent any lbs' to do the work...

but considering that i bought the fork for 50 (works great with a little refurb work on my own), i could probably buy another one down the line for the same, if i had to. and, with bushing wear, you figure there's going to be stanchion wear...
 

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I've replaced bushings on several Judys and SIDs and have a special tool made by a company called HotKarl that is both a bushing puller and a setter. I think I bought it at Speedgoat years ago when Judys and SIDs were the coolest thing. The removal tool isn't that hard to make. Its basically a threaded washer with the sides clipped off so it will drop down the lowers. When the "washer" is dropped down in there, turn it with a long piece of all thread and then thread it onto the end. After that put a large washer over the top of the legs and start threading a nut on. When the nut tightens, it pulls up the all-thread and the bushings pull out with it. The install tool would be trickier to make because the upper bushing is a larger diameter than the lower. I suppose if you had two different pieces of pipe that are the correct diameters it would work fine. Be sure to measure the depths of the bushings first so they go back in the same place. Judy/SID bushings used to be cheap, but I think you have to buy a whole rebuild kit now. I'm not sure if you're rebuilding a newer fork, but I hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks all for your comments. This was more of a "what if" thread more then anything, but when the time comes I think I might have a crack at it anyway.

None of my local shops have the proper tool, and I'd rather play with my own fork them let them at it with their block of wood and sledge hammer... :p

I didn’t realise Rock Shox have a guide, I’ll download it and have a look.

drunkle - It sounds like you have some automotive experience hey!! Your puller tool description is quite often used to pull bearings on cars.


I was talking to Dad about it last night, and he suggested making a tool identical to the description Wayndar has given. Great minds think alike hey!!

Simply machine up a nice thick washer the same OD as the bushings, weld a fine pitch nut onto the back of it, and grind two flats so it can be passed through the bushing. Then all you need is a long bolt or threaded rod, and another washer or wooden brace on the top to pull against.

I can quite easily spin up a pair of setting tools in the lathe, just simple punches with two different OD's. One smaller OD profile to slide inside the bushing (nice solid fit) and further up the tool a slightly larger OD profile that is also a nice fit against the inside of the fork leg.

Then it's just a matter of carefully tapping the new bushings in...

Can't go wrong! :D

Dave.
 

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Look here.

Low_Rider said:
Thanks all for your comments. This was more of a "what if" thread more then anything, but when the time comes I think I might have a crack at it anyway.

None of my local shops have the proper tool, and I'd rather play with my own fork them let them at it with their block of wood and sledge hammer... :p

I didn't realise Rock Shox have a guide, I'll download it and have a look.

drunkle - It sounds like you have some automotive experience hey!! Your puller tool description is quite often used to pull bearings on cars.

I was talking to Dad about it last night, and he suggested making a tool identical to the description Wayndar has given. Great minds think alike hey!!

Simply machine up a nice thick washer the same OD as the bushings, weld a fine pitch nut onto the back of it, and grind two flats so it can be passed through the bushing. Then all you need is a long bolt or threaded rod, and another washer or wooden brace on the top to pull against.

I can quite easily spin up a pair of setting tools in the lathe, just simple punches with two different OD's. One smaller OD profile to slide inside the bushing (nice solid fit) and further up the tool a slightly larger OD profile that is also a nice fit against the inside of the fork leg.

Then it's just a matter of carefully tapping the new bushings in...

Can't go wrong! :D

Dave.
http://www.bikemannetwork.com/biking/c/COMPFKPRTRS

They have bushing kits for a couple different RS forks and all run about $26 each. If you make that tool, please let us know how it works. I have a 03 RS Duke SL U-turn on my ENO'ed Zaskar. With the travel set at 70mm, the handling is right where I like it. The problem is finding a newer fork with similar travel, so keeping this fork seems like my best option until I get another frame someday. The fork is fine now, but I like doing my own maintenance and if I had to change out the bushings, I would like to know if its possible without buying that expensive tool from RS.

Brian
 
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