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Okay, it's not technically a 29'er question, but if any of you were 200+ lbs, what type of road bike wheels would you look for. Given all the research many of you have done on 700c wheels, I figured there'd be an opinion out there. I want to spend about $200 for a complete wheelset.
 

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Kind of depends what sort of riding you were planning on doing. General riding (ie. not racing) I would look at some Shimano/Campy (whatever is compatible with the group you're running) hubs, laced with 36 14/15G spokes and brass nipples to a good solid rim, not the lightest thing you can find, there are a lot of such things out there. Such a build may not be too exciting, but it will stand you in good stead over the long haul.

If you're looking at race/higher performance wheels you could cut down on the spoke count, go for some lighter rims, and use alloy nips everywhere except rear drive. You could also consider some "boutique" spokes, though that would probably push it over your budget.

The last, but by far the most important, ingredient in the mix is the builder. Almost any set of combined parts can be built into a strong and durable wheel by a competent builder. However you can take the very best parts and turn them into a wheel which is complete cráp if you don't know what you are doing. Finding a builder who you trust can be hard, so if you have some mechanical skills I would highly recommend getting a copy of Jobst Brandt's The Bicycle Wheel and doing it yourself.

Sam
 

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A few suggestions...

Look at the Vuelta XRP series wheels. Rather good value.

Mavic Cosmos are a good bet.

Ultegra hub on Mavic Open Pro's.
 

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im in that weight range.

bought some cane creek areohead lx wheels from greefishsports.com for about 230.00. nice ride, holding up well, and look cool. a little lighter than ultegra/open pro/ db/ alloy nip wheels, which i think they had for about 180.00 as well. great service too. saw em on mtbr's home page one day.
 

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Witty McWitterson
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Shoot, at 230, I'm running a pretty simple set up that has lasted me years! Your component hub(I run campy) laced 32 times to an appropriate rim with double butted spokes and brass nipples. Great wheels that just keep spinning. Like kolo said, on top of everything else you choose, the builder of your wheel is the most important thing you can 'buy'. A crappy wheel can be made up of the best components if some hack mechanic builds it for you. Look for some one with experience. Personal preferance is to stay away from pre-built or maching built wheels. I'm sure they're all fine and dandy, but I just don't trust them at all.
 

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MichiganClydesdale said:
Okay, it's not technically a 29'er question, but if any of you were 200+ lbs, what type of road bike wheels would you look for.
There is a lot of voodoo and folklore WRT wheels. I weigh in at 215(down from 250) and I build my all own wheels out of necessity and build wheels for my riding buds in exchange for beer or riding gear.

Most any PROPERLY BUILT standard wheel will be able to sustain your wieght. The key really is a quality build by someone who knows what they are doing. Factory or (machine) built wheels would be an economical place to start and then just have someone who knows what they are doing properly tension and stree-relieve them for you.

My Road/'Cross bike set up for road right now is runs:

Front:
Hugi 32° ISO Disc hub
Velocity Deep-V rim
DT-Swiss Alpine_III spokes, laced 3x

Rear:
Hugi 36° ISO Disc hub
Velocity Deep-V rim
DT-Swiss Alpine_III spokes, laced 3x

All I need to do is switch to some knobbie rubber and I'm good to go on the 'Cross circuit.
 

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If you're looking for a set of dedicated road wheels is what you're after it would be hard to beat something like this...

Performance wheels

Go to the "Best Deals" board, find a 20% off coupon code and you'll have a great set of wheels for 160.00. When I build my own wheels I use 14 or 14/15 spokes and brass nipples which is what the above wheels will have.

I have to disagree with the poster above who states that the most important aspect will be the builder. Wheelbuilding is not the magical art that many believe it to be. It is purely mechanical. The "secret" to a good set of wheels is selecting the correct components for the application in which they will be used.
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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Ahem! Uh....wait a minute!

Go Kart Motzart said:
......

I have to disagree with the poster above who states that the most important aspect will be the builder. Wheelbuilding is not the magical art that many believe it to be. It is purely mechanical. The "secret" to a good set of wheels is selecting the correct components for the application in which they will be used.
There is one aspect to your qoute which is missing, I think. That is, after "selecting the correct components...", you then must have them ASSEMBLED CORRECTLY! Thus, the method used to assemble such components becomes critical to the final outcome. I say, handbuilt wheels rule. Not for any "magical" quality, as you stated, but for the unsurpassed attention to detail that only a pair of skilled human hands can bring to bear. Just my humble observations :)
 

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Build 'em yourself!

I've said it once and I'll say it again: wheelbuilding is fun, it's relatively easy, and for a novice, all it requires is patience. Conventional 3 cross wheels will be plenty strong enough for you for road use, though you might want to go with 36 spokes (especially in the rear) and brass nipples (again, especially in the rear). Wheels will always come out of true, and you'll round off your alloy nipples sooner or later - 10 grams of weight isn't worth the headache unless you're racing for money, IMO.

I build a lot of wheels for heavy folks (and for 29ers that will be ridden offroad) with the IRD Cadence rims. They claim to have some magic alloy that is stronger/lighter/blah blah blah. Hype aside, I've been riding 32 and 28 spoke wheels with these rims OFFROAD (as in, on my 29er - and I'm an EXTREMELY aggressive rider) for more than a year without any problems. Admittedly, I'm 160 pounds, not 200+, but if you're looking for road wheels, those might be good rims. They weigh 395g or so, and they retail for around $40, I think. Not a bad deal - get yourself $40 worth of double-butted spokes and an Ultegra hubset (or something nicer if you can find it) and you're well within your $200 budget.

There's nothing quite as satisfying as riding on something you built yourself. Seriously.

-Walt
 

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Walt said:
I've said it once and I'll say it again: wheelbuilding is fun, it's relatively easy, and for a novice, all it requires is patience. Conventional 3 cross wheels will be plenty strong enough for you for road use, though you might want to go with 36 spokes (especially in the rear) and brass nipples (again, especially in the rear). Wheels will always come out of true, and you'll round off your alloy nipples sooner or later - 10 grams of weight isn't worth the headache unless you're racing for money, IMO.
I agree. I enjoy building my own wheels and have built many for others, but the problem is I can't go out and buy the components, build the wheels and come out anywhere near the prices you'll find on built wheel specials. That said, there is also something very rewarding about doing it you'reself.

You're right on the money about the brass nipples. Big durability advantage with no downside.
 

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Those Cadence rims OK with big tires?

It's nice to hear a positive testamonial about a 40$ rim, that is for sure, especially one that weighs <=400g, that is great! Do they work OK with regular 29" tires/2.1"? Now that I write this it sure sounds like a dumb question because if you've been hammering them for a year then OBVIOUSLY they work but just for the record...do they work well with the fatter tires? I'm thinking "race wheelset 2005". Any thought's on disks and those rims...???
 

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IRD Cadence rims

Ok, here's the lowdown:
-They're relatively cheap. I think retail is around $40-45, I sell 'em for a bit less with my frames.
-They're relatively light. Weight seems to fluctuate a bit, from 385 (the lightest I've seen) to 402 (the heaviest) grams. 19.5mm width, 700c.
-They are manufactured in Asia for IRD, like all IRD's parts.
-They have a pinned (not welded) joint. On some of the rims the joint is not perfectly flush, which can lead to an annoying little noise when using rim brakes. They seem to have taken care of this problem now, though. Rims are a double wall design with eyelets.

My personal experiences:
-Running both 32 and 36 spoke rear wheels, and 28 and 32 spoke front wheels, I have had no problems. I'm 160 pounds, former norba pro and motocross racer, so I'm not easy on equipment. Wheels require truing every month or two, but considering that I ride every day, that's not surprising.
-I have put riders up to 180 pounds on these rims with good results.
-Never tried them with disc brakes, but I imagine they'd hold up fine.
-No tire "squirm" issues above 30 psi with 2.1 IRC Mythos or WTB tires. Heavier riders might have a different experience.
-Work fine with DIY/Stans tubeless. I have run them both tubed and tubeless, but generally just go tubeless because, well, I hate tubes.

-Walt
 
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