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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:madman:
So, I rewarded myself for hitting below 300 with a Santa Cruz Tallboy. My next mission, at 250...a road bike. I know this is the mtbr forums, but surely some of you guys have a road bike that you enjoy riding too right? I'm looking at the Trek 1.2 or Trek Crossrip. CX bikes appeal to me a whole lot, weight not a factor as I won't be racing on the road, at least with the CX bike I could do gravel grinders and hard packed city trails with it as well as road. I'm more looking to get something to stack up miles each week with, along with a spin bike for rainy days at the house. Trying to keep price for my bike around 1200, so I can still spend another 600 for my son a road bike since he loves riding with me on the trails so much.
 

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I was real close to getting a 1.2 myself when upgrading from my 7.2 FX a few years ago. When I went to the store to get it however, they had a previous years model Gary Fisher Rail with essentially the same components as the 1.2 for about 560$ when it was all said and done. Road is a great transition from mountain if you just want to go out for a long ride. It's also a great way to go and explore your city. For cold/rainy days I hook up to my Cycleops trainer and do a "trainer and a movie" session. Good luck with your purchase and post pics!
 

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I am over 6ft6 , 220lbs and also ride a 1.5 trek which is very similar. The only advice I would give is upgrade the brakes to 105 or similar as the stock brakes are very poor. I found this out at 30mph down a steep hill ! Also the saddle was too narrow for me which again was easily replaced. After that I have found the bike works well for me and the endurance fitness it gives really helps my mountain biking.

Road bikes as you suggest are too fragile to take off road especially for heavier riders. I would kill mine very quickly if I did.

Good luck.
 

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It's not really whether the bike is fragile or not. The bike is fine... It's about the tires. CX Tires being wider (and with knobbies), are naturally going to be better on gravel roads. CX bikes also have clearance and brakes that are suited for those clearances.

I myself, along with countless others have ridden their road bikes on gravel roads.

PS, All the major tours (Tour de France, Vuelta, Giro) have stages the are either entirely gravel or feature several gravel sections. Hell the USA Pro Challenge last week featured a gravel stage as well.

The advice above for the brakes is solid. 105's with some Kool Stop pads = night and day difference from the stock horrible pads.
 

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There's an interesting fashion for cyclocross bikes at the minute. This is good for a lifelong cycling enthusiast, as it means I'll be able to get one for cheap once they go out of fashion.

But for the record, cyclocross bikes are not for distance work. That doesn't stop people riding them over distances and tours, but they are not optimal. Of course, a lot of bikes that have the word cross in their name are really general purpose road bikes that you could do cyclocross on. But beware if you decide to buy a dedicated cyclocross bike.

What you need in a road bike for a 250lb rider is:

1. A good fit.
2. Weight-appropriate wheels and other components. You don't want a stupidly low spoke count, especially in the back wheel.
3. Room for big tyres. If I wanted a road bike with calipers, they would be deep drop, with room for at least 28mm tyres with mudguards. More likely, I would want room for 32mm tyres with mudguards which usually means canti brakes.

Off the shelf bikes that might be good would be something like the Planet X Kaffenback, or the Surly Crosscheck. 36 spoke rear wheel with a strong rim like a Rigida Chrina. 32 in the front is nice.
 

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6'1", 230 here, and I've been riding a Scott CR1 for a while now. The geometry on the non-aggressive position (read: not the Foil...too racy) is actually pretty well setup for a taller guy. FWIW, I ran 23mm tires, and didn't end up going to 25's like I thought I would. Just keep those pressures up.
 

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I've had a lot of great rides on my Specialized Secteur Disc, it's relaxed road geometry (almost cyclocross) and since it has disc brakes I can go up to 38c tires and even use MTB wheels if desired

the Roubiax (carbon secteur) or the new diverge might be of interest as well

I'm 250#
 

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Take a look at disc brake road bikes. They might fit your needs. Or perhaps a touring bike?

I'm wavering around 270#
I ride a Charge Plug and absolutely love it.
IT has handled everything I put it through with no complaints
 

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A road bike is a great addition. Road miles really help with mtb trail conditioning, IMO. I am in much better pedaling shape now. Plus, there are a lot of days when I don't have time to get to the trail, but can head out and grab 20 miles on the road bike in 75 minutes or whatever. I have also taken up commuting to work, which is a good way to maintain a fitness level.

I'm on my second road bike. I have been between 230# and up to about 265# on my bikes and, although I was worried about them, haven't had any issues with components or breaking stuff. My first bike was an aluminum Jamis with mostly 105 level parts. Now I have a carbon Felt Z4, also with mostly 105 stuff. I've put probably 10k miles combined on the bikes, all w/ stock parts, wheels, etc., and have had no issues other than normal wear and tear.

One thing I like about my Felt Z series is the slightly more upright geometry. More comfortable than my Jamis with more traditional geo. The Giant Defy, Spesh Roubaix, etc. all fall in this category.

I think a CX bike is probably a decent alternative, although I've never ridden one or really felt the need. One advantage would be the ability to put wider tires -- my road bike frames both say they take 28 mm tires, but I get rubbing with these. But I only ride on the road, never gravel or anything like that, so I've been more than happy with the road bikes.

Good luck!
 

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I have been riding a Trek Domane 4.0 since December for road duties. I am 288 right now and have had ZERO issues with wheels or components. I also run 28mm tires on the thing to have a little more meat under me to run lower pressures and smooth the ride. I think the cyclocross bike option is the way to go. Get one and put some good 32mm tires on it for road duty and then ride the piss out of it.

I conccur with the idea that if you don't get a cyclocross bike, get a bike with the endurance style geometry.

Between the 1.2 and the Crossrip, I would pick the Crossrip for myself. I only slightly regret getting my Domane because the Boone was released a few months later... I would LOVE to have the capability of a cross bike over just my endurance machine.
 

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I'm 235ish lbs and have ridden two years on my Fuji Roubaix 3.0 (I.e. the cheapest Roubaix Fuji sells, was $600 in 2012). Bike has been fantastic, I have never worried about the strength of the bike or wheels, ridden on everything from 50mph descents to 20%+ steep pothole filled climbs with rocks and hopping curbs and on numerous century rides.

I run a 25mm tire in the front and 28mm in the back because I've ridden on loose roads where skinny tires sink.

I highly recommend supplementing mtn biking with road bikini, lots of fun to go out for long city rides exploring.

Edit: Road bikes are not fragile, I realize these guys aren't 250lbs but the bike can take A LOT more abuse than most think, search YouTube for Road Bike Party to see what even a road bike can do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm 235ish lbs and have ridden two years on my Fuji Roubaix 3.0 (I.e. the cheapest Roubaix Fuji sells, was $600 in 2012). Bike has been fantastic, I have never worried about the strength of the bike or wheels, ridden on everything from 50mph descents to 20%+ steep pothole filled climbs with rocks and hopping curbs and on numerous century rides.

I run a 25mm tire in the front and 28mm in the back because I've ridden on loose roads where skinny tires sink.

I highly recommend supplementing mtn biking with road bikini, lots of fun to go out for long city rides exploring.

Edit: Road bikes are not fragile, I realize these guys aren't 250lbs but the bike can take A LOT more abuse than most think, search YouTube for Road Bike Party to see what even a road bike can do.
That's a badass vid, thanks for sharing. In all honesty, it's going to finally come down to what's available and if anything is on sale I'll snag it up. I did get a chance to do some miles on a cross bike recently and man, I really, really like it. I rode one with the drop bars, and one with the flat bars, and I have to say the drop bars make a big difference for the longer rides and comfort. I really like them. It was a Giant, out of my price range but man it felt smooth. I also rode the Crossrip and liked it as well. Thanks everyone for the input.
 
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