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If your replacing forks, replace it with the 2010 Lefty pbr carbon. Its so light they have to attach balloon weights on it at the factory so it doesnt float away. Of the few shops that carry them, they love them because they float at the top of the display case and dont take up valuable shelf space in there.....:D

Ok, back to reality. They are light at 2.8 lbs, but Im not sure how availible they are yet.

Have you looked at putting a set of rims on like the Mavic 819 or 823. They are stupidly strong (at least in my experience) and run about 500gr and 675 gr respectively. You can aslo go tubeless this way. I run and 819 in the rear and a lefty ST in the front. Both have been very durable and reasonably light.
 

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Interesting....................Many mountain bikers that dabble in a little racing now and then get a road bike to get better at mountain biking.

kneejerk said:
I did get a very good work out while riding those heavy rims up hill and on the flats (even). It just may be the training I need to turn around my mediocre road biking performances. I'll just get some downhill rims once I get back up to normal speed on the Freerides!
 

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Dan Gerous said:
Mavic 819 are not very wide though. Notubes make light and wide rims, although they are not as strong as Mavics.
How wide are the 819? Im looking at runnign 23c slicks for road riding. I can maintain a speed of 17mph on my rize 4 with small block eights as this bike is lighter than my road/xc bike.
 

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kneejerk said:
with Mavic, that last portion of the rim # is the internal width of the rim, so 819 the 19 refers to the internal width, at that width a 23c would likely be too narrow, atleast a 25c would be the ticket, although the rim outer width may still stick out some and possibly contact the ground on aggressive turns, just keep the tire pressure ultra high to avoid deflection,

That would be one strange looking Rize 4!
I like to freak people out. I have those 23cx559 tires on my XC bike with drop bars. I usuallly run 120+
 

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Ground Pounder
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I'm not sure of your weight, but I'm guessing you can get away with less pressure in the tires, which should help you going up and down. I'm 220 with gear and I run mid to high 30s on true 2.1in tires.

I'm in the Bay Area as well, so if you post your weight and the trails you ride I may be able to give you some good starting points.

Read up on tire volume and it's effects on rolling resistance (tire forum). Higher volume tires can really help you out off road in a number of ways.
 

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You should be able to go down to 32-34 psi or even lower in the front. That will improve your grip no end.

Unfortunately the only real way to find out what psi you can run given your riding style, terrain, tire/rim combination and suspension settings is to keep on dropping the pressure 2psi each ride until you get pinch flat. Then add 2psi, write the settings down and don't change them!

I run 30psi front, 36psi rear and weigh 200lbs.
 

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Genius
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kneejerk said:
I don't want to get pinch flats so I think 40 is right on for me now.
You started out tubeless... Why go back to tubes? I'm 210 and last night I ran 26 front and 30 rear. For grip the lower the pressure the better. Running your tire in the reverse direction will = less grip for dirt. On pavement direction doesn't really matter and 40 should be adequate. Any higher and the applied surface area of the tire on the pavement is diminished to a point that high speed leaning turns will become slick.
 

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yorkshire mud monkey
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make me look like ive gone over kill :) i have nuke proof hubs on combat halos with conti mountain king 2.4 35psi in them.
 

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kneejerk said:
I just realized the reason Cannondale made the seat angle rather relaxed on the Rize 140 after moving my seat a little further forward for better climbing performance. It made a difference on really steep down hill sections, making the bike want to flip me over the top more.
Try and adj seat post or a higher rise stem and or bar. I kept my saddle at my optimal climbing position, then put on a gravity dropper, then went from a 5 deg to 20 deg stem....

If I were to rate the percent of DH improvement for each upgrade, I would say 70% for the gravity dropper and 30% for the stem.

Just so you know, steep pitch climbing is an art form. I suck at it, but I'm way better than I was. Learning to track stand on an incline, knowing how to pop the front wheel on an incline, getting that body weight shift correct to get he back wheel up over the root without loosing traction.
 
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