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Hi all,

I realise this is an age old question, but I'm contemplating riding in an 8 hour event in the new year, and am considering using a low rise riser bar (rather than my usual flat bar) for this event, should there be any demonstrable advantages.

I'm 42, of average fitness and currently ride XC races (at a modest level) of around 1 1/2 to 2 hours length, with no problems with shoulder/arm/wrist fatigue. My current bike is a DS with a reasonably upright position, but with the current flat bar set up the saddle is around 1" to 1 1/4" inches above the bars.

I'm wondering if a low rise bar (possibly a Easton EA70 Monkeylite) with it's upsweep angle and increased sweep angle would reduce fatigue over the eight hours, and how much lighter the steering would be considering the movement of body weight to the rear due to the 3/4" increase in bar height.

Any thoughts?
 

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Used a riser bar all last season for 6-hour races, Solo 24 hours, 100 milers and even xc's.

First year running the bars, and love having the more upright and wider bars to reduce the stress on the lower back. Combined with a nice set of Ergon Grips, you're gold.

 

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it comes down to personal preference and body/bike fit.

some people have longer torsos and vice versa. hard to say what will work for you as opposed to others.

if the ride is soon, don't make too drastic of a change. your body will regret it even if its for the better. getting the grips a little higher tends to save the back and put more weight on your seat.
so it depends on what you want to hurt more.

for me, i like to be more in a racer type of position. stretched out with a long TT and long stem on flat bars. stem is reversed and slammed to the lowest spot. like this i am perfectly balanced and can still get behind the seat to do steep drops. my areo psoition is maximized as well(some thing many riders do not think about).

after about 6 hours my back will start to get tired and get more as time progresses. but the time and speed i make up from this position i can afford to stop, take a rest and get back on before others catch up.


it comes down to a balance and which way(or body part) you want to destroy first.

3/4" doesn't sound like alot. or enough to make to much difference unless the sweep make you more upright as well. but i have heard others say that a small amount relieved back strain.



bar dampening is a good point, but is more reletive to your weight and front suspention dampening. on a ridged its very important.
 
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