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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am trying to build up a xc hardtail to do some beginner racing. i am searching for componenets now.

i would like to use a riser bar so as to not be completely bent in half while riding, but do not want to compromise handling or change my position on the bike so as to rob myself of power or speed (though i am not exactly a fast rider to begin with). i am 5'10".

i will be using a 6 degree 90mm race face deus xc stem. anyone use a 1.5inch riser bar on their xc bike, or is this going to put me too upright?

thanks for the help.

clunger
 

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Easton Monkey Lite is my favorite. It's carbon , lite and $$
Having said this, I have a brand new never used WTB riser bar that I won in a race. If you want something good and inexpensive, send me a PM
 

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There are so many variables to take into account (frame geometry, torso length, flexibility etc.) so there's really no way to tell if you're going to be too upright. But what is "too upright" anyway?

Do what you're most comfortable with and fine tune your fit from there.

Doing a professional bike fit can be very worthwhile to get you headed in the direction of a "proper fit". FWIW, when i did my fit at Boulder Sports Medicine, they suggested that i get a riser bar. If you did go with a riser, you certainly wouldn't be the only one out there with one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the offer but i am looking for a carbon bar.

i too like the easton but most of what i can easily find for the easton is 1"rise only. i think i want a 1.5" rise, but i am not sure if this will be too much rise for a xc "race" bike.

wondering if anyone else has a 1.5" riser on their xc bike?
 

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I think there is this misconception that an "xc race" bike has to have a flat bar that's set super low with a 0 rise stem and no spacers. So I'd say you have to find a balance. A riser bar is generally wider and is going to give you more leverage for steering and you can simply counter act too much rise on the bar with the spacers or stem.
 

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Do yourself a favor and get a professional bike fit so you don't have to waste $$$$ on components that you are not sure will work for you. Some people need a riser bar because their specific fit requires it. You don't want to be too upright because you will sacrifice leverage in your legs. You don't want to be too bent over because you sacrifice power from your large muscles. It really just depends on your specific body measurements and your frame measurements...it's really hard to guess on all this by yourself. There are systems out there that can figure it out for you and save you time and $.

Good Luck,
Namrita
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks to everyone for the help.

i ordered a race face next xc carbon riser bar this morning. will let you know how it rides once i get everything in and back on the bike (this is a complete rebuild).

one of these days i am going to get around to having a professional bike fit for both my road and xc bikes.
 

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Linoleum Knife
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clunger said:
one of these days i am going to get around to having a professional bike fit for both my road and xc bikes.
I find it fascinating how people will spend hundreds of dollars on new stems, handlebars, seat, seatposts, different length cranksarms, etc. etc.

But they won't cough up $40 for a fit session.

It's like taking a handful of perscription drugs for different ailments, but never going to the doctor to find out why you are sick.
 

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One advantage I've found of the riser bar over the flat bar, and this is coming from someone who had nothing but flat carbon bars, is that sometimes while racing I want to be in a slightly more upright position (tech downhill for example). While other times I want to be more low. The riser bar allows me to achieve both positions, while the flat bar doesn't allow me that flexibility.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
forkboy said:
Nope. Go hog wild.
ha ha

thanks rideon for the comments. those were my thoughts for guessing that a riser would be more comfortable/versatile for the type of riding i plan to do with this bike. glad to hear it is working out for you. hopefully i will be able to say the same thing in a week or so.

forkboy - in all seriousness - did you find that a bike fitting truly made a big difference in your mountain bike riding? did you end up purchasing any new components based on the fit, or did it primarily entail adjustment of the parts you already had?
 

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clunger said:
forkboy - in all seriousness - did you find that a bike fitting truly made a big difference in your mountain bike riding? did you end up purchasing any new components based on the fit, or did it primarily entail adjustment of the parts you already had?
I know you didn't direct the question at me, but I will respond anyway :)

1) If you get a professional bike fit by someone that really understands the science behind it AND knows what they are doing, you will not believe the results...potentially much more positive results than any high dollar super light bike alone could get you.

2) Your question about purchasing new components or adjusting parts (i.e. moving spacers around, turning a stem upside down, moving a saddle fore or aft) are really subjective. Honestly, it's different for everyone. You don't always have to replace parts...but in case you do, bring your spare parts along, it can save you $$ during the fit.

I think you are in NC? I know there are Wobble-naught fitters up there that would be happy to tell you more. I'm in GA, and that's the system we use, with great success.
 

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Linoleum Knife
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namrita said:
1) If you get a professional bike fit by someone that really understands the science behind it AND knows what they are doing, you will not believe the results...potentially much more positive results than any high dollar super light bike alone could get you.
Yep - I got my fit done by an extremely knowledgeable guy. He did the fit on my roadbike, but I paid attention and was able to transfer the settings over to my MTB's.

Strange hip-pains - gone
Strained neck - gone
wrist pain and finger numbness - gone.

Now anytime a friend complains about those kind of problems, I drag them down to Bicycle Bob and let him go to town. The most I've seen anyone need is a new stem or saddle, but 90% of the time it's just adjusting what you have already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
that's good to know. the guys at my lbs do provide a fitting service, but when i have asked previously they said they were most well versed in fitting for road bikes. if the knowledge you gain in having it done on the road monster is essentially transferable, i will be able to kill 2 birds with one stone.
 

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40mm K-Force for me

justalittlepup said:
I have the 40mm high-rise K-Force on my large Spider with no spacers under the stem and it puts the grips slightly below the tip of my saddle which is a good all-around riding position for me. I could have a couple of spacers under the stem and a lower rise bar instead, but when I bought the bar I didn't quite know how things would end up.

I have never had a real bike fitting, but I can see where it would be a great idea... I will eventually get one.
 

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I suggest getting as low a rise as possible. It will give you the sweep of a riser bar, but not the height. You can still get down fairly low and raise it more with spacers or stem if desired. Go for something in the 1/2" rise or 3/4" rise. I think you will find the 1.5" rise will lighten your front end too much.
 

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I'm going the same way as most posters on this thread are. The number one thing you should do on a new bike is a fitting.
Maybe I'm just lucky that the shop I deal/race with is very proactive on this. You buy a bike from them, they fit you on the bike. I'm sure it's the best from them too, after all they want to keep people/riders happy....and therefore returning.
 
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