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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought an NX Ripmo about a year ago, and have been absolutely thrilled with it. It has been mostly stock, but I'm switching to double down casing on the rear after going through four EXO aggressors in less than the lifespan of one DHF up front, and I started running DMR VTwin pedals because I like the platform. The problem is that my bike is now somewhere around 33 pounds (size L). Any thoughts on what the best bang for my buck would be in a weight loss program? Obvious answers seem like wheels and drivetrain, but both seem pretty pricey as far as weight loss goes. I'd be happy to "downgrade" to a cheaper drivetrain, particularly something less finicky than Eagle has been for me.
 

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If Eagle has been finicky, it's either because it's NX or set up wrong. I have it on all my bikes and has been the most flawless drivetrain I've ever owned in 30 years of riding. NX also isn't light, especially the cassette.

You didn't mention what you're willing to spend but practically any drivetrain will be lighter. Do you have a carbon handlebar? Lighter wheels are an obvious choice, lots of deals on Pinkbike classifieds. DD casings won't be light either. Not sure what you're having problems with the standard Aggressor as they last me a long time. Pretty much 90% of our riding group has switched to them and nobody bothers with DD which isn't going to help with tread wear anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've had two specific problems with Eagle: 1) the upper pulley has ejected from two different derailleurs, bending the crap out of the cage and ending my ride both times. I've used red Loctite this time around, so hopefully that helps. 2) it's just so easy to misalign between its sensitivity and the long cage. I've had multiple rides where I've apparently bumped it a bit and been unable to straighten things out with the hanger straightener.

And as for the other stuff, I currently have aluminum bars. Carbon might be a good first place to start. And I'd consider wheels, but really have to keep my spend below $500. That's what makes this a bit tricky. If that means I just have to deal with a heavy bike, so be it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh and as far as the EXO casings, I've put holes through each of them long before the tread even begins to wear down. The most recent was a 1/2" gash through the tread while flying down Downieville here in Northern CA.
 

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You can save weight by going to 11spd. The 12 speed eagle is really a 10-42 (or 11-42 for NX) 11spd cassette with a an extra 50t cog. That adds weight. However unless you get a deal on used 11spd system it is still going to cost nearly as much as an eagle. I run a 11spd on my 2018 Specialized Epic to keep the weight down, but that is an XX1 system I got used/low miles. And that bike is 22.5lbs with nearly every weight saving trick I could do while keep it reliable. It has carbon wheels, carbon cranks, carbon bars, carbon seat post (now carbon dropper seat post), XTR brakes and the XX1 11spd.

In your case you can make it lighter with wheels and drive train and carbon bits, but it will cost you lots of money. Tires are the only cheap place you and save weight, but that is the place you added weight for durability. So you are kind of stuck.

I just ordered a Rimpo yesterday. Standard GX build and I am expecting weight at 30lbs or so. I opted for the 2.6 Nobby Nic over the Maxxis because I wanted the 2.6 and better rolling resistance. If don't expect them to get many miles as no nobby nic I have ever run has given me good life span before tread wear out, but I hope the feel it is good. Personally I have had good luck with Bontrager XR Tires. Plan for this bike will be XR4 in 2.6 however some say the SE casting is more durable.
 

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Basically change all components from Sram to say Shimano XT and that will see you lose quite a bit of weight. The cassette is super heavy, rear derailleur also a bit of a brick, the brakes (if you have the lowest-tier Levels as I got on my NX build) are also very heavy for two-pot calipers.
 

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A Mcleod rear shock will save 1/2 pound. $339. Should ride better as well. I have one on order.
 

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You can save weight by going to 11spd.

I just ordered a Rimpo yesterday. Standard GX build and I am expecting weight at 30lbs or so. I opted for the 2.6 Nobby Nic over the Maxxis because I wanted the 2.6 and better rolling resistance. If don't expect them to get many miles as no nobby nic I have ever run has given me good life span before tread wear out, but I hope the feel it is good. Personally I have had good luck with Bontrager XR Tires. Plan for this bike will be XR4 in 2.6 however some say the SE casting is more durable.
I would avoid going 11 speed, unless your trails don't include steep climbs. Why not rather invest in a GX cassette? It is significantly lighter than the NX, at a reasonable cost. I am not sure why you are having all these issues with your Eagle drivetrain, as I think it has been the most reliable by far.
For info, my medium GX build with ibis 942 carbon rims, carbon bars ( very inexpensive upgrade) and Hans Dampf / Nobby Nick tire combo weights 29lbs and change.
 

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I just ordered a Rimpo yesterday. Standard GX build and I am expecting weight at 30lbs or so. I opted for the 2.6 Nobby Nic over the Maxxis because I wanted the 2.6 and better rolling resistance. If don't expect them to get many miles as no nobby nic I have ever run has given me good life span before tread wear out, but I hope the feel it is good. Personally I have had good luck with Bontrager XR Tires. Plan for this bike will be XR4 in 2.6 however some say the SE casting is more durable.
Wow...a Ripmo eh? I remember when you started a "bike search" thread and of course, got everybodys favorite options sent to you whether they met your criteria or not. I've been demo'ing longer travel 29ers myself and narrowed it down to the Yeti SB130 or Ripmo. Yeti was most comfortable climbing bike I've ever ridden but Ripmo was a close, close 2nd going up and way more fun coming down. I pick mine up on Friday and I'm actually trying the XR 2.6 up front for the first time ever, mostly because I'm headed to Oregon next week and I'm hoping it will do well in the loam. The Ripmo should absolutely RIP all over Phoenix. Great choice!!
 

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Oh and as far as the EXO casings, I've put holes through each of them long before the tread even begins to wear down. The most recent was a 1/2" gash through the tread while flying down Downieville here in Northern CA.
More bad luck, I'm 205 before throwing on a pack and I run 2.5 DHF/Aggressor in DV and knock on wood, have never had so much as a simple flat yet. I've never bought a DD and never will with those weights. I've been told I "ride light" because I make no attempt to avoid any chunk nowadays but rarely have flats. I won't say how long it's been because karma will slap me in the face if I do. Good luck with those DD's.
 

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I think you should just ride your bike and forget about it being heavy because it really isn't ever going to be a light bike.
It's funny I see read about people wanting to make their Ripmo to be like a Ripley and a Ripley like a Ripmo, I don't get it.

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If I were you, I'd put that $500 away in a place you can't touch it, save another $7-1000 and get the Ibis 935 wheels. You'll drop over a pound in the most important place. After that I'd get brakes and then drivetrain. You will have diminishing returns once you get into bars, stem, saddle, etc. Lots of money for not much in weight savings. Maybe a dropper like OneUp if what you have is a pig.

Great frame that can last you a long time. I just totally rebuilt my HD3 and lost 2+ pounds between wheels, shock, fork and drivetrain. It didn't come cheap but went from 30+ to 28+.
 

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Replace wear items as they wear out. (Or sooner.)
This E Thirteen cassette will save you about 300 grams over an NX cassette.

https://www.bike24.com/p2309432.html

Pick up a used XO rear derailleur from eBay. There should be plenty coming available as people spring for AXS.

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Dont forget youll need an XD driver with that cassette. NX uses a splined Shimano driver.

A cassette is next on my list but I havent found a decent price/weight ratio replacement yet.
 

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You can save weight by going to 11spd. The 12 speed eagle is really a 10-42 (or 11-42 for NX) 11spd cassette with a an extra 50t cog. That adds weight. However unless you get a deal on used 11spd system it is still going to cost nearly as much as an eagle. I run a 11spd on my 2018 Specialized Epic to keep the weight down, but that is an XX1 system I got used/low miles. And that bike is 22.5lbs with nearly every weight saving trick I could do while keep it reliable. It has carbon wheels, carbon cranks, carbon bars, carbon seat post (now carbon dropper seat post), XTR brakes and the XX1 11spd.

In your case you can make it lighter with wheels and drive train and carbon bits, but it will cost you lots of money. Tires are the only cheap place you and save weight, but that is the place you added weight for durability. So you are kind of stuck.

I just ordered a Rimpo yesterday. Standard GX build and I am expecting weight at 30lbs or so. I opted for the 2.6 Nobby Nic over the Maxxis because I wanted the 2.6 and better rolling resistance. If don't expect them to get many miles as no nobby nic I have ever run has given me good life span before tread wear out, but I hope the feel it is good. Personally I have had good luck with Bontrager XR Tires. Plan for this bike will be XR4 in 2.6 however some say the SE casting is more durable.
Haha! Love it.

Wednesday and Thursday I rode both the old version and new versions of the SC Hightower. They were nice bikes, but climbing on them was challenging (V2 was better but not significantly). I had to sit way forward to get them to climb properly. Tight switchbacks were a total pain in the ass too (up or down). But pointed down in the super chunk of our northern New Mexican mountains, they ripped (either bike). I also rode a Yeti SB130 a few weeks ago and had a similar experience to what I felt on the HT. SB130 was better going down that said.

My LBS is also an Ibis dealer and they happened to have a proper sized Ripmo demo for me and so I took it out for a quick spin on our town trails-the Dale Ball Trails. I went over to the south section (sort of like your South Mountain stuff) which I rode both V1 and V2 HT's on so I had a direct comparison. It was so different that making a comparison would be inaccurate at best. The HT's go straight downhill and reward big speed but sacrifice line changes or maneuverability with and over the bike. The Ripmo was 98% as fast down but with way more feeling of where and what the tires were doing, and therefore, considerably more confident inspiring (for me). The geo differences between the SCHT and the Ripmo speak to different design philosophies. Coming from an XC background, I immediately felt right at home on the Ripmo while the SCHT was like driving a dump truck through a slalom course: good if you don't care about making turns, but otherwise not so much.

The Ripmo I demoed had the Fox Factory upgrades, GX drivetrain, Ibis carbon wheels with their hubs, the 185 Bike Yoke dropper, an Ibis carbon bar, and Maxxis 2.5 Minion tires without tubes. It weighed in at 29lbs in an XL. When I brought back the Ibis I immediately ordered it! The Ripmo is quite possibly the best bicycle I have ever ridden.

For the OP, change the drivetrain completely out to GX when you wear your current NX cassette out (about $550 complete). Biggest improvement in handling and weight loss will come from carbon wheels too. Ibis makes nice wheels ($1200), but there are others worth checking out. Light Bike makes good wheels for about $1000 and there is a custom builder (Speed Gear Bike) who will use LB rims and DT Swiss 350 hubs for about $850. All tires wear and tear. Proper line choice, pressure, and tire selection for terrain make for better longevity. But I wouldn't bother with Maxxis DD stuff (unless you ride over lots of chert). They tear too and just as easily if the situation is right (or wrong, as the case my be! Haha!). Plus if you want weight loss, they won't do that. But remember, spending money on the bike is a loss leader, you will never get one dime back on them. I am spending $6600 retail on the new Ripmo and I would be lucky to get $2K if I sold it and its a current model! So spend money on it because you ride the hell out of it and the money spent means more fun, but otherwise a fool and his money are soon parted. Good luck and have fun!
 

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Sram Managed to build a 1x that is heavier than 2x! But besides that everything is going to be quite expensive if ti makes a dent in the 33 pounds and change! The main candidates from least to most expensive are:

  • Tires: this can be the least expensive item to check, try to go down one size in the back
  • Handlebar. Get a Renthal Fat Carbon Lite. 180 grams.
  • Pedals. There are sub 300 platform pedals. X-speedo for example.
  • Saddle. Get a Volt Carbon and at 150 grams it will save a bunch
  • The cassette. You do not need to go 11 speed. Get a Garbaruk 12 speed 1048 or 1050 and save almost half a pound. They come at 340 grams
  • Crankset. Race Face Next SL (+BB)
  • Wheels. Very expensive (unless you go lightcarbon) but you can shave a bunch

PS It can be done. My HD3 with Pike Dual and 2.6/2.35 tires is still under 26 pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for the feedback everyone. I actually just toasted my rear rim this weekend (boosted pretty high off a jump with a rocky landing and collapsed the sidewall), and am thinking about wheeis. Problem is again durability. I used to have a set of M60s, but broke two of them before switching back to aluminum (at least you can bend Al back into the right shape!). I think drivetrain is the right answer for me. I still have to decide what, but I don't think 11-42 will be too much of a problem. I used to run 1x10 on an 11-36 with a 32 up front before people realized that 1x was the way to go.

In response to the "ride your bike" and "ride light" comments: I certainly try to do both of those things. Taking some weight off the bike would be purely a luxury, as I always opt for more climbing and don't generally like taking shuttles, etc. As far as riding light, well, maybe I'm just not smooth enough. I've always been hard on bikes, and while I'd like to change that, I'm certainly not willing to slow down to do so. So, in the meantime, I'm going to work on making my bike as bulletproof as reasonably possible.
 
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