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I just got my Kona Unit...man it is a fun bike, my first SS. But the fork is killing me...sheesh. I haven't ridden a rigid fork since '94....and frankly I didn't miss it.

So what's up with the whole fully rigid thing? I meen what are the benefits?

Cost is the only one I can think of off the bat. Maybe turning quickness, but barely.

Is going fully rigid just another way to turture your body and reduce the fun factor? I don't get it...

Looking for another fork soon, probly the Fox Terrelogic if I can find one for a reasonalble price.

any thoughts?
 

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King Pin
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Rigid.

For ME, it's the simplicity/weight/steering precision et al.

I started out on rigid mountain bikes back in '85 or so, and I honestly didn't find anything spectacular concerning suspension stems/seatposts and then squishy front ends and ultimately full suspension......just didn't do it for me.

In my thinking, the main benefit concerns "picking the line" through the rock gardens and such we have up in Arizona. I can't "bomb" over any of this stuff like I would a squishy bike, yet have to use my skill to gentle navigate. I've not yet been left behind by my geared/suspended brethren.....not yet.

Money is a definite concern, although I have enough to afford the latest and greatest Fox.

Fun factor?? You're stretching it there buddy!

Try rigid/fixie offroad....you'll love it!

Maybe I'm just gettin' old.

Lambone said:
I just got my Kona Unit...man it is a fun bike, my first SS. But the fork is killing me...sheesh. I haven't ridden a rigid fork since '94....and frankly I didn't miss it.

So what's up with the whole fully rigid thing? I meen what are the benefits?

Cost is the only one I can think of off the bat. Maybe turning quickness, but barely.

Is going fully rigid just another way to turture your body and reduce the fun factor? I don't get it...

oLoking for another fork soon, probly the Fox Terrelogic if I can find one for a reasonalble price.

any thoughts?
 

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King Pin
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Yup.

Most of you fine folks will find yourself in this quandry, yet I've run "suspensionless" for nigh on twenty years now....I'm diffrent'....don't try it.

Aktooally, carpal tunnel surgery would cost me TEN BUCKS! Great insurance, we have! I think they even waive the ten dollars IF a hospital admission takes place....woohooo!

Zen_Dude said:
Cost is not a benifit, Because carpel tunnel surgery will cost more than your new suspension fork.
No ridged for me.
 

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Rigid is not for everyone

Lambone said:
I just got my Kona Unit...man it is a fun bike, my first SS. But the fork is killing me...sheesh. I haven't ridden a rigid fork since '94....and frankly I didn't miss it.

So what's up with the whole fully rigid thing? I meen what are the benefits?

Cost is the only one I can think of off the bat. Maybe turning quickness, but barely.

Is going fully rigid just another way to turture your body and reduce the fun factor? I don't get it...

Looking for another fork soon, probly the Fox Terrelogic if I can find one for a reasonalble price.

any thoughts?
I like it because it's lighter and more responsive. Not to mention the non maintenance thing. It's especially benefical, to me, on the climbs...just a snappier feel.
It's not for everyone. The majority of the trails I ride are fast singletrack withought a lot of rocks. If I lived somewhere different or my body just could take the abuse, I might be on a suspension fork full-time. Use whatever is most comfortable and efficient for you and your style of riding.

You may want to try a fatter tire, squishy grips and a carbon bar before you give up the the P2 fork. Those things helped smooth out my ride.

Good luck.
 

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Diversity is good

One of the things I love about biking is we're not all the same. Some of us are old and some of us are young. Some of us are liberals and some of us are conservatives. Some of us are male and not enough of us are female. Some of us ride geared and some ride SS. Some of us ride FS bikes, some ride hardtails, a rare few ride softtails, and some ride fully rigid. Whatever works for you is good.

Of course the advantages of suspension are self evident: more comfort, better control on rough stuff, higher speed on descents, etc. But here are some advantages of rigid forks:
  • Less weight. Easily a pound or two of savings, which would otherwise cost $200-1000 in component upgrades.
  • Maintenance. Nothing to leak, need adjustment, wear out, air up, lube or stop working in extreme conditions.
  • Efficiency, especially vs. sussy forks without a lockout feature. Try riding a hardtail mountain bike around town on pavement and notice how much it bounces when you're accelerating hard. That's wasted energy. This can especially be an issue for SSers, who stand up a lot while climbing. Again, less of an issue for forks that have lockout, but not all do.
  • Money. A decent rigid fork costs well under $100. A decent pogo fork will run you ... what, $400 and up? I don't even know.
  • Control, I guess. To be honest, I didn't notice the difference the year I had a front-suspended bike, but a lot of people say they have better control with a rigid fork.

I'm not saying either approach is inherently better. My take is that every component and accessory on my bike has to justify its existence. Any part you add will add weight, complexity, maintenance and cost, and conversely any part you remove will subtract all of those things. The majority of riders don't see the "justification" for singlespeed riding either, and like suspension, gears have their advantages.

For me, I've found that the advantages of shiftable multi-geared drivetrains are outweighed by their weight, complexity, maintenance and cost, at least on a mountain bike. For most of the time I've been MTB'ing, I've found the same is true of suspension. That's for my riding style, which is more oriented towards long rides in the woods than towards big climbs and big high-speed descents. The mix of riding you do and the the sensitivity of your wrists and/or neck may dictate a different answer.

In fact, I may have to switch to front suspension. In May I received substantial neck injuries in a rear-ender car accident, after not having quite fully recovered from a similar accident a year ago. Once I'm riding again, It is not at all clear whether I will be able to do long rides again without at least some neck pain, and it may be that suspension will be necessary for me to be able to do them. C'est la vie.
 

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Rigid forks are pretty predictable. Sometimes unforgiving. They make you pick better lines and i think they make me flow smoother (for me at least) as I can feel the trail out better. Depending on what kind of trails you ride on, suspension might be a necessity though.

One thing you may want to try is to get big tires(not those skinny 1.9's), medium-low psi. Thats all the cushion i "need" for my trails when i pick the right lines
 
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