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I purchased a Niner One9 after borrowing a friends for a month or so. His had suspension and it certainly was fun to ride and did not beat me up on those extended bumpy downhills. Mine came with a Niner Carbon Rigid Fork and although it is so much lighter you do feel it after awhile.

What percentage of SS riders go rigid? What rigid fork do you go with Carbon or Steel?

Thanks
Robert
 

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Depends on your terrain and how fast you like to go. There's trails like in Northern AZ and around Tahoe which are rocky, technical, and borderline unrideable. There's trails like here around Missoula that are smooth, fast, fun, but dare-I-say, boring?

Then there's the chess-game-trialsin way, and the mach-speed-freeride way.

I prefer a rigid steel fork, but I don't mind picking my way through rock gardens, sometimes coming to a full trackstand to set up the rest of the line (especially when riding fixed). On the other hand, if you're into flow, speed, and blurring through the bumps like they aren't even there, then go with suspension.

My complaint was always that suspension seems to help with little bumps, but when the rocks get bigger than the travel of your suspension, it can't soak them up anyway, and just robs you of control.
 

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Rigid! Been running rigid for 10 years, don't think I can ride a shock again. Steel and Carbon both work well.

I also find the Ergon grips help to support you wrist and limit fatigue.
 

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sunset1123 said:
Depends on your terrain and how fast you like to go. There's trails like in Northern AZ and around Tahoe which are rocky, technical, and borderline unrideable. There's trails like here around Missoula that are smooth, fast, fun, but dare-I-say, boring?

Then there's the chess-game-trialsin way, and the mach-speed-freeride way.

I prefer a rigid steel fork, but I don't mind picking my way through rock gardens, sometimes coming to a full trackstand to set up the rest of the line (especially when riding fixed). On the other hand, if you're into flow, speed, and blurring through the bumps like they aren't even there, then go with suspension.

My complaint was always that suspension seems to help with little bumps, but when the rocks get bigger than the travel of your suspension, it can't soak them up anyway, and just robs you of control.
Couldn't have said it better myself.

On long trips where I know my upper body is going to get tired I usually take out the geared hardtail anyway. Its the sub 2 hour rides where my SS rigid really shines for me. Nothing like clearing a technical section no matter how slow you go. Really freaks guys out on 6" dually bikes when you ride by like a turtle on the rigid as they walk a section. :thumbsup:
 

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kacerrob said:
I purchased a Niner One9 after borrowing a friends for a month or so. His had suspension and it certainly was fun to ride and did not beat me up on those extended bumpy downhills. Mine came with a Niner Carbon Rigid Fork and although it is so much lighter you do feel it after awhile.

What percentage of SS riders go rigid? What rigid fork do you go with Carbon or Steel?

Thanks
Robert
This is like asking, "steak or fish?"

Depends on the side dish, your nutritional needs, your tastes, your mood.

--sParty
 

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rigid. when the zombies start ravaging your city and all fuel-driven vehicles are rendered useless, what will be more reliable: a rigid steel fork or a fork with moving parts, aluminum, plastic and rubber, seals, suspension fluid, etc? I'll keep my brains inside my head and stick to my 1X1 fork.
 

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mack_turtle said:
rigid. when the zombies start ravaging your city and all fuel-driven vehicles are rendered useless, what will be more reliable: a rigid steel fork or a fork with moving parts, aluminum, plastic and rubber, seals, suspension fluid, etc? I'll keep my brains inside my head and stick to my 1X1 fork.
LOL. This.
 

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mack_turtle said:
rigid. when the zombies start ravaging your city and all fuel-driven vehicles are rendered useless, what will be more reliable: a rigid steel fork or a fork with moving parts, aluminum, plastic and rubber, seals, suspension fluid, etc? I'll keep my brains inside my head and stick to my 1X1 fork.
How fast can zombies run down rocky downhills? A suspension fork might save you from being eaten if they catch the rigid fork guys first. Also, after you get to the bottom of a rocky downhill, if you have a suspension fork you will have more strength left for smashing zombies with your bike (although a rigid fork bike is lighter so it is easier to throw at zombies).

Just stock up on fork seals and fork oil and you will be ready for the zombie apocalypse even if you do have a supension fork.
 

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assuming these are the slow variety, a rigid fork with a large-volume tire should suffice. if the strain goes a little more lucid and mobile, a good suspension fork might be a better choice.
 

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sunset1123 said:
Depends on your terrain and how fast you like to go.
Word man. I love a rigid steel fork, but then where I ride 90% of the time, what I would gain most by switching to a nice squishy fork would be added maintenance and weight. However, most of my rides also tend to be under 3 hours. If I had the time to ride more and spend time on different trails, while I will always prefer a rigid bike, I would not mind something with suspension.
 

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In PNW mud and in the zombie apocolapse rigid. But that is a bigger question, which might be relegated to wheel size. After all, 29ers can probably roll over the body parts better.

These are the obvious answers: rigid is great if people like going slow. If you like fast, suspension.
 

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umarth said:
These are the obvious answers: rigid is great if people like going slow downhill sometimes. If you like fast, suspension.
fixed for you.;)
 

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I've found my rigid carbon fork really draining on the faster bumpier downhills. Bigger tyres help out a bit, but not much. The other day however i found that while try to follow a fast mate on an xc duallie, it does seem to get a bit smoother the faster you go. You start to almost skim the tops of the ruts. But you have to really watch it though as the rigid forks are not forgiving when you plow into some bigger ruts/rocks at speed. So it definitely is possible to go quick just not as comfortable or easy.

I think eventually i'll get a set of suspension forks, but they will be 80 or maybe 100mm tops. Just something to take the harshness out of those descents without adding too much weight and keeping the nice fast steering. If I had longer climbs and smoother singletrack round here then i wouldn't even consider suspension forks though.

Although i guess it really comes down to what sort of zombies you have on your local trails....:p
 

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Both

Then swap out depending on given location, trail conditions, mood, etc...
 

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Got one of each - Monocog w/ Salsa Cromoto Grande, and Mariachi w/ Reba. I like climbing on the rigid better, I'm faster on the Reba, and they're both fun.

If zombies start coming, screw the bike--I'm jumping in my Land Cruiser with my guns and ammo.
 

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mack_turtle said:
rigid. when the zombies start ravaging your city and all fuel-driven vehicles are rendered useless, what will be more reliable: a rigid steel fork or a fork with moving parts, aluminum, plastic and rubber, seals, suspension fluid, etc? I'll keep my brains inside my head and stick to my 1X1 fork.
I LOL'd
 
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