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Beginner
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw a few earlier posts on this subject, but I figured that I would see if there were any Marlin owners that had experience with the forks I've been eying. I've been looking at different options. Two that have peaked my interest were the Niner Reynolds steel fork and the Surly Karate Monkey fork. Because they're cheap. I'm not sure if they would work with the geometry of the Marlin. If they don't does anybody have any other options?
 

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Token Hillbilly
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Beginner
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
umarth said:
Measure your suspension fork sagged and you'll know the a-c length to snag.
I'm kinda slow when it comes to this stuff. I take it when you say sagged you mean when the fork is fully compressed? Or is it the opposite? And a-c is axel to crown I presume? Or is it aardvark to caterpiller? Or axe handle to chewy chocolate?
 

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Anyone do a rigid marlin yet?

I just got one. It is pretty sweet. The fork is a heavy mess, but ride-able-ish. It has a lock out, but you can't use it like a rigid fork on the trails. Whenever you pop the front wheel up you can feel the fork drop about 1/2" or so and it makes a loud sound. The fork is better than my trance 4 Manatou fork. Still, I want to go rigid.
 

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openwound
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580 Posts
ThunderFist009 said:
I'm kinda slow when it comes to this stuff. I take it when you say sagged you mean when the fork is fully compressed? Or is it the opposite? And a-c is axel to crown I presume? Or is it aardvark to caterpiller? Or axe handle to chewy chocolate?
"sagged" means with just your body weight on the bike -- not intentionally pushing on the front end nor even biasing the weight more toward the front, just sitting on the bike.

Before you commence with the actual measuring process, it's a good idea to cycle the fork a few times to get it moving freely and ensure it's not sticking in any way.

To measure, put a zip tie around one of the stanchions, pressed down so that it's sitting on the fork seal. Put the bike next to a wall, step over and onto the bike, sit on the saddle (the idea being to get on the bike relatively "gently" so that you don't mash the front fork while mounting). The fork will compress as you put your weight onto the bike. Once again, gently step off of the bike without mashing the fork down. Measure the distance that the zip tie moved up. That's your sag. IIRC, when set-up correctly, a cross-country fork will have about 20% sag (20% of the total fork travel)

A-C= axle to crown. And not the bottom or underside of the crown, it's the surface where the crown race sits.
 

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Im a bit of a noob, but wouldn't mixing a steel rigid fork on a aluminum frame be a bad combo? Im picturing the frame giving way before the fork in a collision???
 

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openwound
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BigVaz said:
Im a bit of a noob, but wouldn't mixing a steel rigid fork on a aluminum frame be a bad combo? Im picturing the frame giving way before the fork in a collision???
Interesting observation, but it's not an issue that I've ever heard of. Folks mix and match to suit their preferences or needs.
 

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steel forks would bend, the frame would probably be ok.

Are you worried about losing your precious G2 geometry? Other than the fork of the Sawyer are there any other g2 offset rigid forks? (the sawyer fork is pretty cool, but probably pretty heavy like the rest of the frame)
 
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