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Baked Alaskan
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this is a dumb question but I want to get the tool to take the screw on cap off the Bonty SS hub on the Rig, but I can't find it. Can anyone direct me to the proper tool? I'm gonna look at a Boone cog or two. Thanks in advance.

Also, loggged a couple hundred on it so far and I really dig the Rig. I'm definitely not going to get rid of the Turner any time soon but its a nice change of pace. Its a keeper for sure. I like not paying attention to anything other pedaling and braking. But I find myself standing and hammering a lot on steeper hills, contrary to the stay seated and spin when you have gears.

I've never ridden with any SS'ers before, is this right? Should I stay seated more and grind it out or just stand and hammer away? I've noticed that I pretty much never stop pedaling except going down when I would have to spin ridiculously fast to go any faster. I like that, I can already feel it has helped. Certain hills are becomong less and less of a struggle each time I hit them. Good stuff, thanks for the inspiration guys.
 

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Steamroller
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1,227 Posts
Stand and mash that SS

OK , like I said I has not really checked out the rear hub on a Rig, I assumed it would take a regular cassette lockring tool. I'm editing this to say simply,

Use the tool Shiggy suggests below
 

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mtbr memeber
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578 Posts
As long as we're asking ss technique questions...

I know I should be posting over on the ss board but oh well, I tried a brief search over there and didn't come up with anything. If you want to apply maximum power on a standing climb, do you keep your arms bent, pulling, channeling strength through them? Or do you let them go straight and let your ligaments pull some extra duty?
 

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Steamroller
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I use any muscle that can help

jpre said:
I know I should be posting over on the ss board but oh well, I tried a brief search over there and didn't come up with anything. If you want to apply maximum power on a standing climb, do you keep your arms bent, pulling, channeling strength through them? Or do you let them go straight and let your ligaments pull some extra duty?
I'm a big guy and I need all the help I can get, I definately use my arm muscles, pulling like mad. I also use shoulder, stomach, back and chest muscles. If tongue muscles would help, I'd use them too. One of my favorite things about SS riding is how much of a whole body workout you get. I use every muscle I can and still grind to a halt and hop off to push on some hills, but by then if I'm riding with any gearys, they have slowed to about walking pace anyway.
 

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Baked Alaskan
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1,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bingo!!!!!

shiggy said:
Wrong lock ring tool.

The Rig uses an external lock ring

This should work:http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=TL7345
That's it, thanks Shiggy.

Mattman, I'm feeling you, though I don't know if I can be considered a big guy at 195#. It is a great workout though. I really feel like I left it all out there after a ride.
 

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mtbr memeber
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Mattman said:
I'm a big guy and I need all the help I can get, I definately use my arm muscles, pulling like mad. I also use shoulder, stomach, back and chest muscles. If tongue muscles would help, I'd use them too. One of my favorite things about SS riding is how much of a whole body workout you get. I use every muscle I can and still grind to a halt and hop off to push on some hills, but by then if I'm riding with any gearys, they have slowed to about walking pace anyway.
That's a good answer, but you get my point right? If you let your arms go straight you can send the work to different muscle groups. I suspect for example if you do this the trapezius muscles end up doing a bit more. I think that's the muscle that runs from the top of the shoulder to the neck. Perhaps I should ask if it's been bad for anyone who has tried a straight arm climbing technique.
 

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I am relatively new to single speed, so I am not sure if the technique I use is the most efficient.

I have found on certain climbs my upper body is very active, and that pulling the bar ends back into the bike puts more weight onto the tires to give me more traction, and also gives me more power. I have read it described as rowing the bike up the hill.

Overall I agree with Mattman. I have used whatever is available, and like the feeling of working out my upper body while cycling.
 

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ali'i hua
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1,796 Posts
AK Chris said:
(snip)

Also, loggged a couple hundred on it so far and I really dig the Rig. I'm definitely not going to get rid of the Turner any time soon but its a nice change of pace. Its a keeper for sure. I like not paying attention to anything other pedaling and braking. But I find myself standing and hammering a lot on steeper hills, contrary to the stay seated and spin when you have gears.

I've never ridden with any SS'ers before, is this right? Should I stay seated more and grind it out or just stand and hammer away? I've noticed that I pretty much never stop pedaling except going down when I would have to spin ridiculously fast to go any faster. I like that, I can already feel it has helped. Certain hills are becomong less and less of a struggle each time I hit them. Good stuff, thanks for the inspiration guys.
I've noticed that only the really strong SSers that I ride with can do longer clibs seated, and I've also noticed that this comes when you're in better shape.

a seated SS climb and a standing SS climb do feel different in the legs, though.

it does sound like you are getting in shape, though if hills are becoming less of a struggle.

another note: a standing SS climb DOES give you a better climbing position for the steep stuff s you've moved your whole center of gravity forward, but this can be an issue- too far forward can equal a lack of traction in certain soil types, especially with some of the decomposed granite soils we have around here.

as for the not stopping pedaling part, being spinny is good!
 

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ali'i hua
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jpre said:
I know I should be posting over on the ss board but oh well, I tried a brief search over there and didn't come up with anything. If you want to apply maximum power on a standing climb, do you keep your arms bent, pulling, channeling strength through them? Or do you let them go straight and let your ligaments pull some extra duty?
totally depends on the climb. some climbs involve little/no arms, while other steep climbs i've finished feeling like i've just done an upper body workout in the gym.

as for arms bent? yes. the majority of the climbs. its just more comfortable.
 

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ali'i hua
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1,796 Posts
the_eleven said:
It has been said:

"Say hello to your single speed, say goodbye to your knees"
ya know, im not sure this is correct.
my knees have never been better, and i have a history of tendenitis from swimming. I'm pretty sure there are others out there who will agree that its definitely not bad for the knees.
 

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Steamroller
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Yes, but it's a crock!

the_eleven said:
It has been said:

"Say hello to your single speed, say goodbye to your knees"
I have had some pretty serious knee problems in the past and SS has helped my knees to be stronger. I checked this with a doctor who said SS was fine. Basically if something hurts, you should stop doing it, or figure out how to do it correctly so it does not hurt.

SS riding should not hurt your knees unless you are doing it wrong. For many of us trying to do long climbs seated in too high a gear is wrong, there are mutants among us who can do it with no problem though.
 

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Premium Member
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the_eleven said:
It has been said:

"Say hello to your single speed, say goodbye to your knees"
TOTAL crock to make a blanket statement like that.

I have been riding SS almost exclusively since '99 (and with 185-190 mm cranks). My knees hurt when I ride my gearies with shorter cranks.

I also had ACL reconstruction in '82. Riding SS has helped strengthen my knee far more than my gearies.
 

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Mattman said:
I have had some pretty serious knee problems in the past and SS has helped my knees to be stronger. .... SS riding should not hurt your knees unless you are doing it wrong.
Ok, SSers, what is the right way? At some point on a long, steep climbs, I am standing and mashing, barely moving, and then I have to stop. Too far forward, I lose traction. Try to pedal seated, knees don't like it.

If I want to go for a hike, I would rather not carry a bike.

Are their new tricks that this old dog can learn?

respectfully submitted,
 

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Premium Member
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the_eleven said:
Ok, SSers, what is the right way? At some point on a long, steep climbs, I am standing and mashing, barely moving, and then I have to stop. Too far forward, I lose traction. Try to pedal seated, knees don't like it.

If I want to go for a hike, I would rather not carry a bike.

Are their new tricks that this old dog can learn?

respectfully submitted,
I use the 24-inch gear...two feet.

If you are having trouble with most of the climbs, lower your gearing.

If you are expecting to never get off your bike do not ride a singlespeed.

There are climbing techniques that help but they can not really be taught in print.
 
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