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I seem to be learning the etiquette as I go. Can you fill me in on any other “rules of the road/trail” that I might should know?

Here are some things I’ve learned; correct me if I am wrong.

1. On trails that travel both clockwise and counter clockwise… The downhill rider yields to the uphill rider. (That is hard because I’m ready to truck it down the hill)

2. To runners or riders… Say “1 more” or “2 more” if you’ve got people riding behind you. (Sound right??)


I am sure there are more. On busy trails (with runners and hikers) should bikers yield to people “on foot”? Do I need to pull over to see if anyone needs help if they are working on their bike?

Curious,
S6
 

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A little south of sanity
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Good questions, I was wondering some of the same things. as for the pullingt over if someone is working on their bike I'd kinda say thats like a stranded motorist.It's alwase nice to see if you can be of any assistance.
 

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Approaching someone from the rear say something like "passing on your left" or "on your left" when it's safe to do so. Ride to the right side where possible (left side if in Britain, Australia, Japan, etc). If there are horses on the trails you dismount and stand off to the side with your bike behind you (I've been told some horses can be spooked by bikes due to their being low to the ground like a predator might be *shrug*) and wait till they pass. Hikers/horses have the right of way always. Don't ride muddy trails (unless you've been told it's okay by the owner/association) because it causes erosion. Don't ride trails closed to bikes. Don't skid. Carry a patch kit/spare tube (nothing sucks more than someone always asking for a tube because they don't want to carry their own). Learn how to repair/change your tire/tube. Go to the I.M.B.A website. Lots of good stuff there.
 

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youre on the right track with those 2

as for stopping to help another biker - i usually slow down and ask if they need anything. most of the time, they say they dont, but you never know.

overall just be courteous to other people out there - hikers, joggers, bikes, etc... We are all out there trying to have a good time so just be nice to people.
 

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Have Cake and beat it 2
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Here in aus one of the recent MTB mags had a good story on a similar issue. apparently in the states (and here as well) a lot of good trails were being closed to bikers because some riders where racing down the trial and abusing hikers and walkers. Said hikers etc then complained to the local council and viola trial closed.
In Northen California a group of riders that rode trails regularly put bells on their bikes so walkers could here them and slowed down when passing walkers and where always polite to them ie saying hello etc.
such a simple thing to do and the result was that that trial stays open whilst others are being closed. When orienteering I've asked for help as I was lost, and was willing helped, I've heard of riders being given tubes by other riders because he had blown both his main and his backup on rough rocks and I always say Hi when passing a rider when orienteering and usually give way to the more competitive rider.
So yes as mentioned you are on the right track,
 

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Eatdrinkride's advice is sound, for sure! :cool:

The group I used to ride with would always hold their fingers up indicating how many more people were behind them, and then a fist if you were the last one. I've found it much better to say "1 more" or "last one." Other than that, just be personable, offer assistance with anything if you're able, and be willing to help if they say they need some. Keep the trails clean, don't be a jerk on 2 wheels, only ride where/when you're told it's okay to do so, and yield to slower riders/horses/hikers until it's safe to pass, and announce when you pass (I've had several jerks on the trail fail to do this simple thing, and almost ended up taking them out from being spooked).

The guys I used to ride with would make it a point to pick up any bottles they saw and transport them to the nearest trashcan. Keep the language clean (I've been guilty of failing to do this from time to time), because you never know who's out there listening.

Other than that, everything's pretty much been covered. The Golden Rule definitely applies when you're on the trail.

Ross
 

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I wear two thongs
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After the fact ettiquette is good too, if you ride a trail system alot offer to volunteer some time with the trail owners doing trail maintanance (this is also a great way to get input on things you'd like to see on the trails too)

If I see a Hiker with a dog I usually hop off the bike too because many dogs will get excited/nervous at the sight of a bike.

Like said before a simple "hello" to others on the trail goes along ways in keeping the general public tolerable to bikers.
 

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Common courtesy
Live and let live
Do unto others...

If somebody yields to me, a "Thanks!" is usually in order. .. It has happened that pedestrians have given me the way at the top of a hill, on a narrow trail, but I have had to tell them to "come on up, I gotta catch my breath".

Dogs: pay attention: bikes upset some of them, some just don't know what to do and where to go.

Horses: many horses spook easily. A panicked horse is bad news...
 

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Talk to horses, they don't necessarily recognize you with a bike attached, but they will know you are a human by your voice. It will keep them from getting spooked and may score you points with the rider, if they don't already have a chip on their shoulder about mt bikers.
 

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EDR
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O.K...forget my advice about hot chics.

Sarcasm is sometimes lost in translation......

I, almost always.....give way to whomever I approach. (unless I am mashing up some steep hill and someone else is about to come down). In this way I have had nothing but pleasant encounters with hikes/mtbr's/and horsie folk.
 

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On singletrack, let the passing rider tell you which side thay want to pass on. On pavement, hold your line, don't weave all over the trail, makes it hard for someone to pass you if you ride like a squirrel.

Descenders yield to climbers.

If you stop to rest, move off of the trail.

Pick up your trash. Or better yet, drop no trash. Pickup others trash.

Don't leave anyone behind in a group ride.

Share water and food with bonking riders.

Have fun!!!!!!
 

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Its been awhile since I've ridden anywhere that I had to worry about yeilding, but that uphill riders get the trail thing can go both ways... When I'm going up a hill, I've always found it easier to let the downhill riders go thru 'cause its easier for me to stop than them. YMMV

Never had a Mexican standoff over it either...

ALWAYS say hello to horses and dogs. Let's em know yer a person and not a chew toy. More often than not, I get ignored by dogs which is nice. Horses are another story.

If you pack it in, pack it back out. Food wrappers, bottles of this that and the other, etc. Take only memories and leave only tire tracks.

For the love of all that's holy DO NOT SKID! Skidding ruins the trails and give the horse #u^kers more ammunition.

Don't ride closed trails. That's an easy one for all of us to preach about, but hard to do sometimes... See above about giving horse #u^kers more ammunition.

HTH,

M
 

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I always slow waaaay down when I pass hikers so as not to leave them in a dust cloud.

I always stop when I see horses. The horse folks usually really appreciate this. Having to deal with spooked horse is not fun. Most of the horses are used to MTBers around here, so the horse folks usually just tell me it is OK to ride on by.

I always yield to the MTBers going downhill and when I am goind downhill, I always try to ring my bell as I am going around turns. We have had a couple nasty head-on collisions here on some of the fire roads around here.
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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here some great basics

horses and hikers always have right away..,.slow down or stop...at least make noise or stop and talk with them...this keeps trails open

uphill rider has right away

courtesy to others at all times....

if you stop then get off of trail....help others when in need ....karma will help you later

ride on trail....if you can't make a stunt or obstacle then walk around it...don't ride and make trail wider
 

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Picture Unrelated
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here some great basics

horses and hikers always have right away..,.slow down or stop...at least make noise or stop and talk with them...this keeps trails open

uphill rider has right away

courtesy to others at all times....

if you stop then get off of trail....help others when in need ....karma will help you later

ride on trail....if you can't make a stunt or obstacle then walk around it...don't ride and make trail wider
Were you trying to win "Zombie Thread of the Year" honors? Because resurrecting a 6 year old thread is pretty impressive.
 

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Were you trying to win "Zombie Thread of the Year" honors? Because resurrecting a 6 year old thread is pretty impressive.
Dudes got 40,000 posts, he does wth he wants! I'm glad he brought it up, I've learned a few things.

Ive gotten into the habit ( copying other riders) to yell "Rider up" if you're on a twisty or tech 2 way trail and a rider is coming at you. Sometimes you're paying too much attention to your line you might not see another rider coming at you til it's too late.

My buddy asked what it meant and I told him it basically means "Im coming toward you don't run into me."
 

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Eatdrinkride's advice is sound, for sure! :cool:

The group I used to ride with would always hold their fingers up indicating how many more people were behind them, and then a fist if you were the last one.
That's very common APV/motorcycle trail etiquette, but for some reason I see very few mtb people do it, and I've seen some confused looks when I do it so I just say how many now.
 
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