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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My friend, lance, claims that because he rides his single speed mtn bike on trails, that he is a stronger mtn bike rider. I told him that he probably became a stronger SS rider but not a stronger mtn biker with a geared mtn bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Some additional notes to think about.
- You can train just as hard on a geared mtn bike as you train on a single speed. A geared mtn bike is a superset of a single speed mtn bike.
- You dont use your optimum efficient cadence on a single speed so you don't develop this strength
...
 

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local trails rider
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A singlespeed bike forces you to go harder in many trail sections where "gearies" normally shift down and go easy. So, at least one aspect of riding/training gets emphasized.

Is that important to me? No, not at all. I just ride. I don't care if another rider is stronger or weaker than me. It does not affect my testosterone levels.
 

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Time flies...
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...I noticed that after some time on my SS, I get more tired / wore down when I spin the granny on my FS bike...??? Makes me want to stay in the middle ring more.
Anyone else notice this?
 

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V-Shaped Rut
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Riding an SS isn't specific enough that it has no carry over to riding a geared bike. On the strength/endurance side it obviously forces you to use a smaller gear climbing than you probably otherwise would. This leads to less shifting even if you go back and ride a geared bike,

On the skill side, riding a hardtail at all forces you to pick better lines, and an SS in particular does this because you don't have shifting taking away from this. The SS also places a great emphasis on momentum since you know you don't have the crutch of a gear to drop back to on that upcoming hill. So you tend to attack flats before hills more.

So yes, it does make you a stronger rider. No, you can't just simulate it by riding your geared bike in one ratio. I tried this, its not the same. :D
 

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I wasn't Kung Fu fighting
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I hadn't noticed just how

much stronger I've become. I had to take some time off of my SS mtb because back/hip problems. So I've been riding my geared ht for the first time in years. I've ridden a geared 5 Spot, but that weighs 29lbs so the weight causes similar effort to my SS. However, the geared ht at 24lbs feels like I'm cruising up hills that used to make me suffer. I rode a 3 hour loop that usually leaves me exhausted on the SS last weekend and I barely felt like I'd put in any effort at all... I actually came home and cleaned the house instead of collapsing in a heap on the couch.
 

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SS riding will make your penis grow 1-3 inches, depending on your original size.................................women have vaginal expansion, but the results are harder to quantify.


this is scientific fact.
 

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dae3xt said:
Some additional notes to think about.
- You can train just as hard on a geared mtn bike as you train on a single speed. A geared mtn bike is a superset of a single speed mtn bike.
- You dont use your optimum efficient cadence on a single speed so you don't develop this strength
...
your logical conclusion isn't based on all factors, but on a simplistic notion that conservation of cadence is a strengthening effect instead of it being a conserving effect.
your "optimum cadence" is that lovely point at which your body is only strainging itself soooo much but not too much to achieve the speed desired.
It's a great place to live in, and I love finding that zone... but single speeding forces your body to accept that things may not always be optimum (in truth on a single speed on rolling terrian it's nearly NEVER optimum!)
while riding a singlespeeder you accept (nay, DEMAND!) that things will get tougher, and your body must compensate for lack of gears, either with legs or with lungs. (see where this is going?)

you can argue that having gears to change down to, and making it easier on yourself, is better because it allows you to maintain your optimum cadence.
but you're making the incorrect assumption that being in your optimum cadence at all times is a STRENGTHENING exercise.

the fact is single speeders will simply accept that the optimum cadence isn't there and travel a different speed, while maintaining a cadence appropriate to the terrain they're on and the gear they've got to work with.
in professional circles it's called interval training... and if you question whether that's a strenthening effect then google it.

optimum cadence is calculated so it DOESN'T stress the body, but it DOES allow you to conserve energy and ride longer... which is why people use those gears in the first place.

ride with or without gears, makes no difference if you're always staying in a perfectly optimum cadence, but it you don't blow yourself up every now and then you're NOT going to get stronger!
(just that on a single speeder you really don't have the option of NOT nuking yourself...)

so yeah, I'd say it'll make you stronger, whether you like it or not.
 

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yes, IMHO much stronger and faster. If you work at it~!

For those who are competitive and want to race bikes.
Riding singlespeed can turn you into a winner. Will also develop lots more upper body/core strength.

Reminds me of when I first started riding SS. Way back when you didn't see alot of SS.

I had been riding over a year and decided to give XC racing a whirl.

Started out beginner cross country and got stomped, 38th out of 60 and felt like vomiting. Could not believe how fast beginner class was. I was determined to improve.

Took an old rockhopper and converted to SS. Kept Riding up mission peak (approx 1800-2000ft climb in 3? miles) until I could do it non stop. Then I started working on improving my times.

Next season, showed up at beginner XC race and won by 5 minutes. ( I am a clydesdale size rider) Then moved up to sport.

So I think with a SS you are kinda forced to push harder. Sometime you ride with max effort then walk, max effort than walk (or ride slow)

That is basically interval/tabata style training and scientific studies (see link at bottom of post) show you get the quicker improvements by training that way.

Some persons will not want to endure that type of physical exertion.

But if you can go SS and work at it, I guarantee you will see an improvement.

View abstract test results.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8897392?dopt=Abstract

I also find if you work on keeping a fast cadence, you can also improve your spin. You can really focus on turning circles.

Some with building upper body strength can try and do a ride standing, you just let you weight fall and try to climb real slow.

Just few drills I used to like to practice on my SS.

I got the best results by riding geared and singlespeed. That kept my shifting skills fresh.

Just another perspective and factual experience with SS

-peace
 

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Golden Bears United
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I get much more tired when I ride SS than when I ride gears.

But, I tend to finish at the front of the pack in my group with SS, and at the back with gears.

So, I ride harder, leading to better results. Not sure if that means stronger.
 

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local trails rider
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Fixed on trails? I am not that crazy (yet) :D I find it hard enough to avoid hitting my pedals on rocks when I can ratchet to keep moving.

It does not take a superman to ride SS. If I can do it ...
 

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dae3xt said:
My friend, lance, claims that because he rides his single speed mtn bike on trails, that he is a stronger mtn bike rider. I told him that he probably became a stronger SS rider but not a stronger mtn biker with a geared mtn bike.
But why would anyone want to ride a geared bike after a single speed?:thumbsup:
 
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