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Wu-Tang Academy Alumni
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently on a Sultan and absolutely love it. The thing is I've kind of fallen out of love with the 29" wheel and want to try something with a little more travel.
My question to the homer team is, would an RFX be a sound trail bike for a marginal climbing/aggressive decending trail rider, riding primarily in SW CO?
or
should I be looking more at the Spot given my riding charistics and local terrain (tons of climbing)?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Wu-Tang Academy Alumni
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nick. said:
Absolutely.
Seriously.

I'm not a d1ck head that doesn't use the search function, I used it and didn't get the specific info that I was looking for.

I understand that they are both top shelf bikes (so is the Sultan), what I am wondering is, not having ever ridden either model, which one would better suit my riding style and the local terrain (long, steep climbing/long, steep descending).
 

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Are you talking about the Durango area? An appropriately built RFX weighs 35 pounds. Do you really want to lug all that weight up the peaks, when you don't need a DH bike for the ST descents? I'd look at a Spot targeted at 30 pounds for this task. Those peaks are high and the air is thin. Disclaimer: I live at sea level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dusty Bottoms said:
Are you talking about the Durango area? An appropriately built RFX weighs 35 pounds. Do you really want to lug all that weight up the peaks, when you don't need a DH bike for the ST descents? I'd look at a Spot targeted at 30 pounds for this task. Those peaks are high and the air is thin. Disclaimer: I live at sea level.
The reason the I'm asking about the RFX is, I've read a lot of threads lately about the RFX being a great "Trail" bike which has lead me to believe that guys are using them as all around rides, not just DH bikes.
 

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I wasn't Kung Fu fighting
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I live on the Central Coast of Cali

The tallest "mountain" here is about 2K. However, the climbs are plentiful and steep. I had a 07 RFX built down to about 29.5lbs. I used a Marz AM SL fork and Easton Havoc AM wheels, Kenda Nevi's 2.35 and an XT group. It was an awesome trail bike.

As nice as that setup was, I sure as hell wouldn't jump it... nor risk casing a 6 footer. So I guess it depends on how 'aggressive' your down hill is... If you love speed, like me... that set up worked supremely. If you love air, you'll have to go 4-5 lbs heavier and I wouldn't want to pedal that tank up a real mountain.

ps I'm 210lbs and it all held up great.
 

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Ich bin ein Knolliner
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Dusty Bottoms said:
Are you talking about the Durango area? An appropriately built RFX weighs 35 pounds. Do you really want to lug all that weight up the peaks, when you don't need a DH bike for the ST descents? I'd look at a Spot targeted at 30 pounds for this task. Those peaks are high and the air is thin. Disclaimer: I live at sea level.
Are you calling my build inappropriate? ;)

This bike is new to me, but it's just as comfortable climbing as my XCE (not directly comparable to the Spot)...and it's a hell of a lot more fun on the DH. The adjustable fork really helps round this bike into a worthy all-day trailbike.

Just because some fat local still crushes me on the uphills while riding his CCDB-powered Highline should have no meaning in your decision. I'm just sluggish.
 

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I had a dusty bottoms approved 35 pound 06 RFX - I loved the bike but got tired of lugging it around - it had coil suspension, 823 wheels etc...so I swapped it for a 5.5 Spot. However, I did love the geometry of the RFX and would have no qualms in building up an 07/08 RFX with air suspension and 819 rims and X9 or XT parts - that would make it a long legged 31 pound trail bike. Plenty have done this. I frankly don't get why dusty thinks an RFX has to be 35 pounds? appropriate for what? a bike is an individual thing and should be appropriate for the individuals needs - not someone else's opinion. I thought the whole reason DT was changing the RFX so much for 09 was because there was next to no seperation between the Spot and RFX currently - which makes them fairly interchangeable. If you like the idea of a 68 degree head angle and over 6 inches of travel consider building up a light 07/08 RFX.
 

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bones get broke said:
My question to the homer team is, would an RFX be a sound trail bike for a marginal climbing/aggressive decending trail rider, riding primarily in SW CO?
You have described my riding style to a T.

I ride an RFX. Perhaps not as nimble as the Spot on climbs, but will be better on the DH. And you can easily build one up around 32-33 lbs.
 

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Go Fast, Take Chances.
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I am a huge fan of the RFX as an all-arounder. I use mine for everything from epic rides(61miles 7000ft elvation gain) to fun after work 1-2 hr rides, I think it climbs and descends great. It does everything I want a bike to do and I haven't came close to finding the bike's limit, I know it can handle more than I throw at it. Mine comes in at 32.76lbs with a strong, reliable build. http://forums.mtbr.com/showpost.php?p=4689241&postcount=101
 

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Got a Six-Pack, air suspension, XT \ SRAM-X9 level parts.
got 2 wheelsets, one for FR and one for trail riding, 4.5 lb difference between the two.

I thought that 33 lb for trails would be great, well it is, but it is not an XC bike.
The geometry and the pedaling is very different than an XC bike.

I have seen people on Spots do amazing stuff, when I grow up and stop doing silly stuff, I'd get a spot.
 

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First, to the OP, I'd say go for it! Keep the build light and it'll climb fine.

If you're going to be doing a lot of climbing and rolly singletrack, definitely lean towards a TALAS fork. Besides being light&stiff, the 130mm mode helps make for a killer 5-spot impersonation.

As to the whole weight topic.
I really can't take DB seriously after seeing wimpy crank bro's XC pedals on his highline? :p
Is he one of these guys that runs spinners and lo-profile tires on his SUV?:confused:

Regardless of year, the beauty of the RFX has always been the versatility. Throw air suspension, SPD's and light wheels on, and it makes a great all-day trail bike. Throw on some heavy wheels, flat pedals, big tires and coil suspension, it's ready for lifts, jumps and drops. There is no "right way" to build this bike for every possible trail. This is a swiss-army knife of a bike.
 

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Baked Alaskan
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Lots of good posts here and I think either would work for you depending on your build. For me there was a pronounced difference with a 36# RFX spec'd with more FR wheels (Hadley/621/14g spokes), 900g tires and so on - it was a lot more work on the climbs. I found myself riding the Spot almost exclusively because I would get so burned on climbs. It still goes up better than many due to Turner's stellar pedaling characteristics, but I could really feel the extra 8# over the Spot.

This spring I sold the RFX and the Spot and built one of the new 5.5 Spot's fairly light with the Dusty unapproved 2009 36 Talas up front. :D Being able to go 160/130/100 up front makes a huge difference and the extra pound up front over the Pike/Z1 from the 5-Spot isn't a hinderance at all. The larger air volume over the 32mm forks makes it uber-plush. The longer fork (compared to Spot standard 140mm forks) raises the BB by about 1/2" or so and massages the angles to a very comfortable range -- for me that's a good thing.

The cool thing with either is you can go air/air and light wheels and tires for the XC days and slap a coil for the DH days and still ride up and down. The RFX is a little heavier (more stout front tri, they share the same rear) and has an extra 3/4" travel. For me, my setup strikes a nice balance in the middle of the Spot/RFX overlap. If I want to go more XC I can slap a Pike and some 2.3's or I can put the 2.7's on, drop the seat, extend the fork and motor.

I've had a number of bikes over the last 14 years - somewhere on the other side of 20 - and the only one I've had for more than 2 years is the Spot (5 years and counting). Its the Swiss Army Knife of MTB's, can do a little of everything. :thumbsup: From the other posts, the RFX is just more of a good thing.
 

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I ride RFX because I ride trail and lift serviced. One bike --> two sets of tires (one set wheels: 721/Hadley/DB or 5.1/Hope/DB spokes). Spot would be good unless you factor in DH I'd think.
 

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I just purchased an 08' RFX to replace my Blur LT frame. I sold my FR/ DH bike & my Blur LT to have single bike that would primarily be trail ridden. I saw the same RFX / Spot debates on the SC forums for the Nomad and the BLT ( I had both a Nomad and BLT). What it ultimatly boiled down to for me was 5" vs. 6.5" travel. Geometry was close but they both rode differnt - one pedalled better one descended better period. Which is your cup of tea ? I chose my components first then chose a frame.
 

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Nick. said:
Absolutely
bones get broke said:
Seriously.

I'm not a d1ck head that doesn't use the search function, I used it and didn't get the specific info that I was looking for.
Whoa Bones ... I wasn't being a d1ck either. You asked "would an RFX be a sound trail bike for a marginal climbing/aggressive decending trail rider?" ... and I started replying right about then. :D :thumbsup: I've had an RFX since '02 and consider it a very versatile bike ... as long as I'm not racing anyone to the top.
 

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So if I had a 5 Spot...

And put a F36 on the front. Would I have the killer climber/decender... Is this what we are looking for???
 
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