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always licking the glass
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Interesting. I’ll be doing a comparison on the 2018 Shred Dogg vs the revved Shred Dogg :)

I did notice some similarities like the stiffness. It’ll be interesting to see once I start trail riding this fall on it.
 

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I know it's an apples to oranges comparison (alum. SD vs carbon TP) but interesting to hear the huge perceived difference in pedaling platform since GG says they didn't rework the kinematics on the revved bikes.
 

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I know it's an apples to oranges comparison (alum. SD vs carbon TP) but interesting to hear the huge perceived difference in pedaling platform since GG says they didn't rework the kinematics on the revved bikes.
Just about every review comments on how efficient/firm the TP's suspension is [metal and carbon] so it's not that surprising to hear that again.
 

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If I bought a Smash with a 160mm fork, and simply changed out the seat stays and shock (let's say to match the OP's build), would I have a bike pretty close to the above rig? Other than the 150mm vs 160mm fork, what is the difference, and would this even work?

I only ask because the climbing prowess mentioned above sounds so much better than some recent reviews (ala facebook) of the Smash's climbing ability. If I could go back and forth between them by simply swapping out stays and a shock (and not add spacers to a fork), it'd be a sweet way to dial in the bike for specific rides without too much hassle.
 

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If I bought a Smash with a 160mm fork, and simply changed out the seat stays and shock (let's say to match the OP's build), would I have a bike pretty close to the above rig? Other than the 150mm vs 160mm fork, what is the difference, and would this even work?

I only ask because the climbing prowess mentioned above sounds so much better than some recent reviews (ala facebook) of the Smash's climbing ability. If I could go back and forth between them by simply swapping out stays and a shock (and not add spacers to a fork), it'd be a sweet way to dial in the bike for specific rides without too much hassle.
The Smash climbs great and you have so much adjustment between Crush/Plush and all the shock settings [all free and can be changed in 2 mins] it just seems like a lot of hassle and $$ for a limited amount of gain.
 

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Glad to hear a vote of confidence for the Smash's climbing abilities. I think it's the perfect bike for 90% of what i do. I was in the Steamboat Stinger this weekend, however, and the description of the OP's bike sounded perfect for that race (and other similar rides that reward speed over smash). I have little doubt the Smash would work, just exploring the possibilities of dialing it in. Then again, sounds like there is plenty of ways to do that without the modular swap.

I appreciate perspective on this, I am getting stir crazy here waiting for my size 4 and am ready to stop speculating and start Smashing (or Pistola-ing).
 

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I was in the Steamboat Stinger this weekend, however, and the description of the OP's bike sounded perfect for that race (and other similar rides that reward speed over smash). I have little doubt the Smash would work, just exploring the possibilities of dialing it in. Then again, sounds like there is plenty of ways to do that without the modular swap.
I'd say swap in faster tires and adjust the suspension. That would get you a lot of the way there. Especially if you are only talking about 10% of your potential riding.
 

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prefers the wide stance
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MORE OF THIS PLEASE

In Line for either a Pistola or Smash and this is the type of review that will help me determine which bike will be best for me. Where I live and ride, Boise/PNW, the TP(a) covers most of my needs. But if the Smash climbs about as good, i figure there's nothing wrong with a little bit more squish....that's what i gotta figure out...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If I bought a Smash with a 160mm fork, and simply changed out the seat stays and shock (let's say to match the OP's build), would I have a bike pretty close to the above rig? Other than the 150mm vs 160mm fork, what is the difference, and would this even work?

I only ask because the climbing prowess mentioned above sounds so much better than some recent reviews (ala facebook) of the Smash's climbing ability. If I could go back and forth between them by simply swapping out stays and a shock (and not add spacers to a fork), it'd be a sweet way to dial in the bike for specific rides without too much hassle.
There's rumor out there of a few guys building up 160mm / 130mm Revved Pistolas who love them.

For whatever it's worth, I went on a night ride with a local crew last night and nailed a Strava medal (#8) on a 1.8 mile downhill segment I rode for the first time - at night. So far I'm not missing the extra travel and feel that the livelier, pumpier rear end carriers more speed everywhere except the gnarliest of gnarly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
MORE OF THIS PLEASE

In Line for either a Pistola or Smash and this is the type of review that will help me determine which bike will be best for me. Where I live and ride, Boise/PNW, the TP(a) covers most of my needs. But if the Smash climbs about as good, i figure there's nothing wrong with a little bit more squish....that's what i gotta figure out...
Honestly, can't go wrong with either bike. I rode the Smash around Shredquarters (a few laps around the block but not on any trails) and the concrete pedaling test made it feel similar to the trail pistol (agian, not on a trail).
 

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I don’t notice a ton of difference in climbing between the TP and the Smash. Granted, my Smash is all coil so it’s heavier. If I was only going to have one setup, I would probably do a Smash with air suspension. I rode the TP on the new DH trails in Ute Valley tonight and was missing the extra squish more than I enjoyed the slightly more responsive climbing.

The interesting thing about a Smash Vs a TP is that if you built each of them with an air shock and fork, the two are going to be within grams of one another. Based on that, it’s almost hard to justify the TP. I wanted to geek out with air vs coil, 51mm offset vs 41mm, etc. so I’m happy with both bikes though.
 

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The interesting thing about a Smash Vs a TP is that if you built each of them with an air shock and fork, the two are going to be within grams of one another. Based on that, it's almost hard to justify the TP. I wanted to geek out with air vs coil, 51mm offset vs 41mm, etc. so I'm happy with both bikes though.
Not exactly. There is a pretty significant geometry difference between the two configurations. The Smash has much longer chainstays, slacker HTA, and the longer travel demands a burlier suspension which will be heavier.

I think you'd also find that the Smash is a much taller bike than the TP.
 

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Not exactly. There is a pretty significant geometry difference between the two configurations. The Smash has much longer chainstays, slacker HTA, and the longer travel demands a burlier suspension which will be heavier.

I think you'd also find that the Smash is a much taller bike than the TP.
Maybe your butt dyno is more calibrated than mine, but I don't notice any difference in height or chainstays to be perfectly honest. I feel like I need to throw the Smash around a little more to get it to turn so that is probably a combination of the head angle and fork offset (perhaps chainstays too). I wonder if I would even notice that difference if I didn't have the two combinations to ride back to back. Regardless, I don't have any problems cornering on the Smash so I wouldn't consider that a deal breaker.

Regarding the suspension, if someone wanted a lighter Smash, I'm sure GG could get a Deluxe and Pike for them. I'm guessing that many people who are on the fence between the two bikes would go with a reservoir rear shock and a more burly fork on the Trail Pistol anyways though which negates the weight difference.
 

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hehe, he said butt ;)

Well, I noticed the difference between my aluminum Smash and my buddies carbon Smash, the carbon felt a lot taller and I felt less in the bike, also less agile. Climbing straightline felt more or less the same; same suspension.

My other buddy has a carbon TP on the way, so it'll be interesting to compare bike to bike. If his TP feels agile and quick, more like my Signal Peak, then I'll probably build one up.

Maybe your butt dyno is more calibrated than mine, but I don't notice any difference in height or chainstays to be perfectly honest. I feel like I need to throw the Smash around a little more to get it to turn so that is probably a combination of the head angle and fork offset (perhaps chainstays too). I wonder if I would even notice that difference if I didn't have the two combinations to ride back to back. Regardless, I don't have any problems cornering on the Smash so I wouldn't consider that a deal breaker.

Regarding the suspension, if someone wanted a lighter Smash, I'm sure GG could get a Deluxe and Pike for them. I'm guessing that many people who are on the fence between the two bikes would go with a reservoir rear shock and a more burly fork on the Trail Pistol anyways though which negates the weight difference.
 

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Formerly PaintPeelinPbody
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I've got this great section of moto trail near my house that I've ridden nearly every bike I've owned in Flagstaff on. That would be a Commencal AM v4.2, a 29er hardtail, my alloy Smash, and now my Revved Trail Pistol.

The top is about 1-2 minutes of ride time, the bottom is about 2-3 minutes.

The top is loose, off camber, and makes some stupid sweeping turns that love to eject you from the trail at speed.

This section favors stability, but it requires precision to keep the bike pointed in the narrow line of grip, then you've gotta get on the gas when it flattens out without getting thrown around too much.

I've set my fastest time on a hardtail, mostly because I can carry more speed into the section from a short climb up to the top of the hill, and I can put power down harder at the bottom.

Anyway, last night was first crack at it with my Revved Trail Pistol - I'm testing some fork mods, so that may have something to do with it, and the section of trail now has some newly exposed roots creating more unevenness. I generally felt faster on the TP - but bunged it up by leaning a bit too hard on an uphill off camber spot that had me dragging my bars.

There is a quick break after this downhill section where I do a fence crossing, then its on to the bottom section I call "Chunderdome". It's like a Red Bull Moto Enduro section. Lots of rock tables, a few little jumps, a sweeping "S" down into and back up through a wash, then a little techy climb into a fast spot with the most awkward of rock rollovers. Out of all the trails I ride in Flagstaff, this section is one of the few that begs you to ride fast, but will absolutely punish you. It great for testing suspension. My fastest time on this section was on my Smash.

I was faster on this section last night up until "S" turn - again, because I made a mistake that cost me time, and then I got hung up on the awkward rock roll vs just hopping it.

The Revved Trail Pistol has such an increase in stiffness that I'm needing to really dial the suspension to get it comfortable. My hands are taking a beat, despite using Revolution grips.

Need to reevaluate my fork setup and selection to make the best use of all this added stiffness.
 

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I thought my old aluminum Smash climbed great, with a coil (push elevensix), when in crush mode though I definitely felt the bobbing in plush that had me reaching for that climb switch.
 

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The Revved Trail Pistol has such an increase in stiffness that I'm needing to really dial the suspension to get it comfortable. My hands are taking a beat, despite using Revolution grips.
I'm not understanding the connection between frame stiffness and your hands getting beat up. The grips/bars/stem are attached to the fork/front wheel. Say the frame was crazy stiff or noodley how is that going to cause hand pain? As opposed to it being an issue with say the fork setup or bars which would make a lot more sense, but have nothing to do with the frame material/design.
 

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The fork/handlebar isn't isolated from the reverberations happening elsewhere on the bike. Yes, the majority of impacts are going to be directly transmitted through the fork/bars, but there are a lot of others vibrations happening that can be felt through the bars as well.

I wouldn't even call the vibrations and stiffness a bad thing. The bike is confidence inspiring, so you push harder, and if the suspension isn't setup right, you'll notice it more quickly.

I'm still torn on whether I should get a coil for the Trail Pistol or not.
 

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The fork/handlebar isn't isolated from the reverberations happening elsewhere on the bike.
For sure, but the only other place reverberations are happening elsewhere is the rear wheel which is isolated from the front triangle by the rear shock. And you are comparing between a bike more travel and a softer suspension kinematics vs. the TP which I would expect to feel more harsh on the same trails regardless of frame material/stiffness.
 
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