Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
779 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i dug up some old pythons and a pair of michelin sprints that i finally found in the abyss of crap i like to call my garage.
both seemed to be ok, but after tugging on the sidewalls of the pythons i noticed a little "crackling" noise, like the rubber is dry, but there are no visible cracks and rubber on the treads appears to be brand new.
there is still talc inside the tire and a seam down the middle, thats how little they were ridden (i think only twice).
what can i do to bring the rubber back to life and avoid throwing away $100 worth of tires??
 

·
some kind of hero...
Joined
·
543 Posts
Jersey said:
so i dug up some old pythons and a pair of michelin sprints that i finally found in the abyss of crap i like to call my garage.
both seemed to be ok, but after tugging on the sidewalls of the pythons i noticed a little "crackling" noise, like the rubber is dry, but there are no visible cracks and rubber on the treads appears to be brand new.
there is still talc inside the tire and a seam down the middle, thats how little they were ridden (i think only twice).
what can i do to bring the rubber back to life and avoid throwing away $100 worth of tires??
As far as I know, you cannot bring the tires back to life. There are some things you can do that will temporarily freshen them up, but it is mainly cosmetic. Over time the volatile chemicals in the rubber compound evaporate and you get left with a crusty looking carcass that's hard as a hockey puck... FWIW I know that some folks soaked the rubber with DOT 3 brake fluid, and you could use a chemical sold as "Belt Dressing" - but I wouldn't waste my time...

If you have no visible cracks, mount the tires and see if they crack under pressure - if not, use 'em. Pythons make the cracking sound when they are brand new, so don't worry about it. They won't perform as well as a brand new tire, but many folks wouldn't notice the difference...

Good Luck!
:cool:
 

·
ride hard take risks
Joined
·
25,423 Posts
Totaly agree tires are a petrolium product. When they get dry they get hard. If you mount them fill with air & check for cracks. If riding on hard pack or rock look for knobs tearing. If you dont get cracks or tearing than they will be fair just not as good as fresh. Might make a great mud tire!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
I have an old Specialized tire that the sidewall is drying out on. The tread is fine though. I used some hockey stick wax on the sidewall and it seems to be working pretty good. The wax is a very thick but spreadable wax that is used to coat the tape on the blade to make it stickier and waterproof. I think Sno Seal might be similar but its been so long since I've used it that I don't remember the consistancy of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
Jersey said:
so i dug up some old pythons and a pair of michelin sprints that i finally found in the abyss of crap i like to call my garage.
both seemed to be ok, but after tugging on the sidewalls of the pythons i noticed a little "crackling" noise, like the rubber is dry, but there are no visible cracks and rubber on the treads appears to be brand new.
there is still talc inside the tire and a seam down the middle, thats how little they were ridden (i think only twice).
what can i do to bring the rubber back to life and avoid throwing away $100 worth of tires??
I'd stay close to home, if the tire blows out you'll be walking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
pacman said:
I'd stay close to home, if the tire blows out you'll be walking.
Its usually just the outer rubber coating that cracks. The casing threads generally don't deteriorate and they are what really hold the tire together.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top