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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The internets have left me with a bunch of conflicting information. I have a Thunderbolt 750 with an alloy frame (not the MSL with the carbon frame). Looking to install the Reverb Stealth (alloy) and while the instructions say NO GREASE and to use Friction Paste, both those recommendations seem to only matter with Carbon Fiber frames.

People have suggested a light coating of grease to prevent future seizing, but that may make the post slip requiring a tighter torque which may hinder the dropper post action.

People have suggested an anti-seize paste, such as the Park Tool brand but that seems to be more for Carbon as well.

Some videos show people mounting the post dry, but they just might be leaving out the prep part.

I'd appreciate it if someone could share the magic bullet here. I'm guessing that, since the anti-seize paste will leave a coating between the post and frame as well as add grit, I could go that route.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
People have suggested a light coating of grease to prevent future seizing, but that may make the post slip requiring a tighter torque which may hinder the dropper post action.
Pretty sure I don't want the possible slippage grease can cause and aluminum alloy on aluminum alloy shouldn't be seizing easily (especially if maintain the seatpost -- remove it more than once every 6 months).

People have suggested an anti-seize paste, such as the Park Tool brand but that seems to be more for Carbon as well.
I think this is what I'm going to do. Found a few posts that suggested TacX would do the trick for Carbon or Alloy frames -- keeping the post in place so you need less torque in the collar.

Some videos show people mounting the post dry, but they just might be leaving out the prep part.
I think going dry depends -- you can end up with a scratched post at best and a seized post at worst if you're getting things wet and not removing/drying them.

From Reddit:

"Never ever insert a seatpost without either greasing or pasting the I.D. [inner dimension] of the seat tube. The reason they suggest using friction paste (yes, EVEN ON METAL FRAMES) with dropper posts is that you aren't likely to move the lower of the seatpost very often, so the paste helps it grip."

"For what it's worth, I needed it on my aluminium frame. I used tacx because, when I tightened it enough that it wouldn't slip, the seatpost wouldn't return all the way back up. Added tacx, backed off on the collar bolt, and all was right in the world, that was 2 seasons ago, haven't had an issue since. Also rockshox recommends it if you have the same issue."


Hopefully this consolidates the info for future readers. :)
 

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Use grease. Even bikes by Giant, Trek and Specialized all come with grease in the seat tube already. Think about it this way- without a dropper, your seat generally takes more of a beating. With a dropper though, it's out of the way more often than not. Why would a dropper slide more than a regular post? It won't. All my post have been greased for over 20 years with no issues. That's aluminum to aluminum and aluminum to Chro-mo. Ttyl, Fahn
 

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Because generally you can clamp the bejeebus out of the clamp to stop a normal straight post from slipping, with a dropper you do not want to tighten the clamp past 5Nm, in most cases less is even better, hence carbon paste with it's grit helps keep things lubed and not require any great clamping force, use it on all dropper post installs, no matter alloy or plastic frame.

Use grease. Even bikes by Giant, Trek and Specialized all come with grease in the seat tube already. Think about it this way- without a dropper, your seat generally takes more of a beating. With a dropper though, it's out of the way more often than not. Why would a dropper slide more than a regular post? It won't. All my post have been greased for over 20 years with no issues. That's aluminum to aluminum and aluminum to Chro-mo. Ttyl, Fahn
 
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