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¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 🚲
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seth from Berm Peak (formerly Seth's bike hacks) is doing a new series on his channel about flipping bikes. He started with a $70 Diamond Back Rigid MTB:

He ended up keeping it cause he fell in love with it, but it was a great video and shows how one can pretty easily pickup a neglected bike for cheap and turn it into a runner.

I have an old Rockhopper from the Early 1990's that I have done a little bit of work on over the years, but everything is original, even the shifter pods / brake combo works.

I love this!
 

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This has become common since covid, at least in my market. Although, a lot of people just buy, take better photos and relist for more.

In any case, I've restored bikes occasionally since 2017, but now the deals get so much interest so I rarely try unless it is something special or if it's a Deore (or better) bike that's cheap. I tend to have OCD about making it perfect so I average about 5 hours per bike (all bearings, cleaning, etc..). I mainly do it as a hobby. It's more fun to work on something your size as you can ride it for awhile before selling.

With this video channel, it may become more popular.
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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Oh yeah, was going to say, it used to a cheap hobby, till Covid, now it's near impossible.

Luckily, that'll change next year and repair parts will be plentiful once again.

I've flipped a few, but generally only buy stuff I like, at which point, after care and feeding, becomes like selling your favorite pet..... =: /
 

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¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 🚲
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A few years ago when working for a different job there was an old bike rack at the back of one of our locations. Being a college town some kids lock up bikes and then just leave them there after graduation. The shop manager needed to free up some space on the rack so his employees could use it and the bikes had obviously not moved in a very, very, very long time. Major rust on the chains, etc. all just beach cruisers. I took 2 of them home with me and cleaned em up and my wife and I started using them for beach cruising. I ended up selling them both locally for like $70. Basic stuff like cleaning and lubing or replacing the chain, new tubes n tires, general cleaning, etc.

I bought a cool schwinn beach cruiser at a yard sale that did not need much at all, rode it for a bit and then sold it for a profit as well.

I find a lot of enjoyment from the work, but with small children I have less and less time to tinker in the garage.
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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16,429 Posts
My kid is 28 at this point. Pro Tip? Kids seem to love cleaning dirty parts.

Give them a damp cloth and turn them loose on a dirty frame in a stand? Hand them some steel wool and show them what rubbing it on rusty chrome does?

You'll have your labor time cut in half, have happy kids, AND get to tinker with bikes while surreptitiously firing up the next generations work ethic....
 

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Ride what you like!
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He ended up keeping it cause he fell in love with it
This is a thing that keeps happening too. People discover that the old stuff isn't as "unrideable" as they had been led to believe. The funny thing is that old frames were based on cruising geometry, so that all-around rideability is inherent in the design, as opposed to today's downhill oriented bikes. Hopefully, this boom in restoration will lead to new parts being produced for old steeds. The vintage auto parts market is HUGE, why shouldn't bikes be similar?
 
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